The Pop History Dig

“Babe Ruth & Tobacco”
1920s-1940s

This advertisement of Babe Ruth and his wife Claire, singing the praises of White Owl Cigars, appeared in the ‘L.A.Times” newspaper, Dec 1938, and likely other publications as well.
This advertisement of Babe Ruth and his wife Claire, singing the praises of White Owl Cigars, appeared in the ‘L.A.Times” newspaper, Dec 1938, and likely other publications as well.
     Shown at right is a 1938 Los Angeles Times newspaper ad for White Owl cigars.  Featured in this ad is the venerable New York Yankee baseball slugger of the 1920s, Babe Ruth, along with his wife, Claire.  This famous pair is making a joint pitch for White Owl cigars.  No, Claire didn’t smoke them, but she’s lending her approval in this ad in another way.  More on that in a moment.

     Babe Ruth by this time was retired from active play, having made his last pro- fessional appearance with the Boston Braves in May 1935.  His celebrity, how- ever, was still very much intact, and remained so for a number of years beyond his playing days.  His image and endorse- ment were sought by numerous interests, many wanting him to pitch their products directly.

     In this ad, the central message from White Owl cigars is printed in bold just beneath the photo of the happy couple:  “Mr and Mrs. Babe Ruth both agree on this Vintage Cigar.”  The ad also uses the “Happily Married” tagline above the main photo, inferring that White Owl Cigars somehow contribute to marital bliss.

Claire Ruth.
Claire Ruth.
     In the ad, both Ruth and his wife Claire provide their separate endorsements for White Owl cigars, each shown in smaller artist sketches flanking the main photo.  They are set out in respective sidebar boxes, delivering a short message — one targeted to women from Claire, and another from Babe.  First, in the left hand box, “Claire says”:

“…We’ve often been painted out as happily married.  We are, too.  I guess it’s because we get so much fun out of doing things together…discovering so many things… like how much mildness means in a cigar.  Babe says mildness comes first — and I say that from my woman’s point of view it’s both first and last.  I’m all for those cigars of his because they’re kind to kisses.”

Babe Ruth.
Babe Ruth.
Then, comes the “Babe” making his endorsement:

“…We’ve had lots of fun together.  Claire knows how much I like a really mild cigar — but I’ve never told her that in addition to being mild, they’re the one cigar I can count on always tasting good too!  It always has the same grand aroma, fine flavor, and Vintage mildness.  No matter when or where I buy them, they’re always a swell smoke!”

     The text from White Owl at the bottom of the ad then continues:

“It’s something when you get a cigar that suits a man’s taste and a woman’s fancy.  But White Owls do that.  Over five billion White Owls have been smoked… a record unequaled by any other cigar in the world.  That’s a smoker’s tribute to White Owl’s mellow mildness…rich aroma.  And the ladies appreciate its scientifically proven ‘easier on the breath.’

“Year after year, White Owls have been improved… No wonder more White Owls have been smoked more than any other cigar…”

Babe Ruth selling his cigars in front of a Boston drug story & tobacco shop, February 1920.
Babe Ruth selling his cigars in front of a Boston drug story & tobacco shop, February 1920.
     By all accounts, Ruth was a regular cigar smoker, and he indulged not only in White Owls, but other tobacco products as well.  He smoked pipes and cigarettes occasionally, and also used snuff generously.  But cigars seemed to be his favorite tobacco product.  Ruth reportedly preferred the larger cigars.  “Twice he went to Cuba to bring back Havanas,” according to Baseball Hall of Fame researcher Bill Jenkinson.  There are some accounts of Ruth on his fairly active road nights,  going through four of five cigars an evening.  One teammate, pitcher Waite Hoyt remembers Ruth on the road relaxing in his hotel suite, and lighting up “a long 60-cent cigar.”

     There are any number of photos of Ruth showing him smoking at leisure, smoking in his car, even smoking while hitting a ball.   There is also a 1919 vintage photo of him sitting at a work bench rolling cigars.  In fact, during his early playing years in Boston, Ruth had invested some of his money in a small local cigar business that manufactured a “Babe Ruth” nickel cigar complete with his picture on every wrapper.  “I smoked them until I was blue in the face,” Ruth reportedly said of those cigars.  But Ruth also spent some time promoting his cigar venture, as the 1920 photo at left shows him standing on a makshift platform pitching cigars in front of a Boston cigar store.  Another photo below shows Ruth at the counter inside the store making a sale. 


Babe Ruth shown making a cigar sale at Boston tobacco shop, February 1920.
Babe Ruth shown making a cigar sale at Boston tobacco shop, February 1920.
Ruth as Pitchman

     Beyond his cigar business venture, however,  and as a result of his baseball fame, Babe Ruth was a sought-after celebrity.  He was regularly sought out to sell all manner of  commercial products — both during his playing career and for some years after, as in the White Owl cigar ad above.  Ruth also lent his name and/or image to a wide array of advertisers, and he endorsed a number of products in one way or another.  Among some of the Babe Ruth-endorsed products were: Wheaties breakfast cereal, Quaker puffed wheat cereal, baseball gloves, Spalding baseballs, Sinclair gasoline, Esso gasoline, Tydol Ethyl gasoline, Mrs. Sherlock’s Bread, Babe Ruth All-American Underwear, Ruth’s Home Run Candy, girl scout cookies, Red Rock Cola, Babe Ruth Gum, Louisville Slugger baseball bats, and other products.

Babe Ruth featured in advertisement for Old Gold cigarettes, probably from the 1920s.
Babe Ruth featured in advertisement for Old Gold cigarettes, probably from the 1920s.
     In addition to Ruth’s earlier cigar business and his ads for White Owl cigars, he also became associated with other tobacco products during his career, including Bambino Tobacco.  He did a few cigarette ads as well, even though he did not regularly smoke cigarettes.  In the undated Old Gold cigarette ad at left, probably from the 1920s, Ruth is shown swinging his bat and giving his endorsement to Old Golds in a “blindfold test.”  In the blindfold test portion of the ad, he is quoted as saying: “Old Gold’s mildness and smoothness marked it ‘right off the bat’ as the best,” signed: “Babe Ruth.” 

     In his prime-time playing years, Ruth also did advertising spots for chewing tobacco, as seen in the ad below for Pinch-Hit Chewing Tobacco.  In 1927, he appeared in the Hollywood film, “Babe Comes Home,” with actress Anna Nilsson, a film in which chewing tobacco is part of the storyline.  Ruth also lent his name and image to advertising spots for Kaywoodie pipe tobacco.

Babe Ruth image and endorsement for Pinch-Hit chewing tobacco, undated.
Babe Ruth image and endorsement for Pinch-Hit chewing tobacco, undated.
     As a young boy, by age seven or so, Ruth was already involved in drinking alcohol and chewing tobacco.  Throughout his adult years, Ruth smoked and chewed tobacco, and he had his share of alcohol, too. 

     In 1946, just before retiring from baseball, Ruth was diagnosed with nasopharyngeal carcinoma, a rare form of cancer which tends to infiltrate other organs.  The location of Ruth’s cancer was in the nasopharynx, or the upper part of the throat behind the nose.  Doctors did their best to arrest the cancer, using surgery and radiation treatments, but were not successful and so they eventually released him from the hospital in 1947.

Babe Ruth in 1945 ad for Raleigh cigarettes.
Babe Ruth in 1945 ad for Raleigh cigarettes.
     Even though Ruth’s cancer was thought to be a result of his use of chewing tobacco, cigars, and alcohol, studies have shown in recent years that other risk factors can also be associated with this particular type of cancer, and these may also have been at work in Ruth’s case.  Among those risk factors are geographic location, genetic inheritance, and certain environ- mental carcinogens.  Still, when Ruth died of throat cancer in August of 1948, it was believed that tobacco was a contributing if not a major factor in his death.

     Additional stories on Babe Ruth’s baseball career and his celebrity at this website can be found at, “Babe Ruth Days, 1947-1948,” and, “Ruth At Oriole Park, 1930s-2009.”  For additional stories on sports or advertising, please see those respective category pages. 

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Date Posted:  25 September 2010
Last Update:  14 February 2011
Comments to:  jdoyle@pophistorydig.com

Article Citation:
Jack Doyle, “Babe Ruth & Tobacco, 1920s-1940s,”
PopHistoryDig.com, September 25, 2010.

________________________________


 

Sources, Links & Additional Information

About a month after Ruth’s death in Sept 1948, “The Babe Ruth Story,” a film by Allied Artists starring William Bendix, was released to theaters. Bendix is shown above in a 1948 back-page magazine ad attired in his Babe Ruth outfit, singing the praises of Chesterfield cigarettes. It appears he is also holding a Babe Ruth-monogrammed “Louisville Slugger” baseball bat.
About a month after Ruth’s death in Sept 1948, “The Babe Ruth Story,” a film by Allied Artists starring William Bendix, was released to theaters. Bendix is shown above in a 1948 back-page magazine ad attired in his Babe Ruth outfit, singing the praises of Chesterfield cigarettes. It appears he is also holding a Babe Ruth-monogrammed “Louisville Slugger” baseball bat.
“The Babe Ruth Story,” Time, Monday, August 30, 1948.

Larry Schwartz, “Lovable Ruth Was Everyone’s Babe,” Special to ESPN.com.

Leigh Montville, The Big Bam: The Life & Times of Babe Ruth, New York: Doubleday, 2006.

“Famous People Who Have Died from Cigar-Related Disease,” The Wellness Letter, University of California at Berkeley, January 1997, Volume 13, Issue 4.

Babe Ruth: Famous People Who Have Suffered from Oral, Head, and Neck Cancer,” American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery, 2010.

Jack Doyle, “Babe Ruth Days,1947 & 1948,” PopHistoryDig.com, April 17, 2008.

Jack Doyle, “Ruth at Oriole Park, 1930s-2009,” PopHistoryDig.com, March 29, 2009.

The Babe Ruth Birthplace and Museum, Baltimore, Maryland.

Kenneth Shouler, “The King of Swings: Babe Ruth Revolutionized Baseball While Indulging a Passion for Wine, Women and Cigars,” CigarAfici- onado.com.

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“Ruth at Oriole Park”
1930s-2009

Statue of a young Babe Ruth just outside the gates of Oriole Park at Camden Yards, Baltimore. Statue by Susan Luery; photo by Leo Cloutier, pbase.com. See other statue perspective, below.
Statue of a young Babe Ruth just outside the gates of Oriole Park at Camden Yards, Baltimore. Statue by Susan Luery; photo by Leo Cloutier, pbase.com. See other statue perspective, below.
     In Baltimore, Maryland, at the Camden Yards baseball park, home of the Baltimore Oriole’s professional baseball team, there is a statue of Babe Ruth, the famous New York Yankee slugger.  Although he became famous as a Yankee, George Herman Ruth ( b. 1895, d. 1948) had lots of history in Baltimore.  He was born there, first of all, and he learned the game of baseball on its sandlots.  And later, as a professional player, Ruth would hit home runs out of earlier Oriole Parks — for all his old friends and school chums to see.  The statue of Ruth at today’s Camden Yards Oriole Park portrays him as an older boy, at the edge of young manhood, about the time he was leaving  the Baltimore orphanage where he had spent his boyhood.  The statue is named  “Babe’s Dream,” alluding no doubt, to his longing for a big league future, or at least something better than an orphanage.

     Ruth was born on February 6th, 1895, a Baltimore saloonkeeper’s son.  He became something of a problem child, and at the age 7, his parents placed him in Baltimore’s St. Mary’s Industrial School for Boys for his “incorrigible” behavior.  The school was run by Catholic Xaverian brothers, and Ruth spent almost his entire youth there.  St. Mary’s was the place where Ruth — with the help and encouragement of Brother Matthias Boutlier — developed into a promis- ing baseball player.

Statues & Icons
Series

     This story in one in an occasional series that will explore how America, and other countries, honor their icons — from famous politicians and military leaders, to movie stars, TV celebrities, and sports heros.  Societies have been erecting statues or otherwise commemorating their famous and beloved figures for thousands of years.  But in modern times, even fictional characters, their ranks swelled by cinema and television, are now joining those up on the pedestal, some for purely commercial reasons.  As statues and busts, the famous personages are typically cast in outsized proportions, some placed in parks or other public spaces.  Still others are found on postage stamps, murals, buildings, near sports arenas, or used in various place names.  Not all of those so honored, however, meet with public approval, though some have broad and continuing support.  The stories offered in this series will include short sketches on some of these figures — past and present — providing a bit of the history and context on each and how the proposed honor came about.

     In 1914, Ruth was first signed to play professional baseball by the Baltimore Orioles manager Jack Dunn who had heard about his play at the St. Mary’s orphanage.  The Orioles were then a minor league team, and Ruth was signed on as a 19 year-old pitcher.  When the other players on the Orioles first saw Ruth, they nicknamed him “Jack’s newest babe” — a moniker that stuck and stayed with Ruth for the rest of his life.


Baltimore News

     In March 1914, Ruth did well in spring training with the Orioles at their camp in North Carolina.  He pitched successfully against the major league Philadelphia Athletics on March 25th, and was also hitting some notably long shots as a hitter.  Baltimore’s newspapers began to pick up on the young rookie.  There were also a few early baseball trading cards of Babe Ruth as a Baltimore Oriole.  They were issued in 1914 by the Baltimore News, along with a team photo card with Ruth included.  However, the minor league Orioles’ business suffered that year.  The professional Federal League had established a Major League team in Baltimore that year directly across the street from the Orioles.  As a result, the Orioles’ attendance plummeted,  seating as few as fifty fans in the stands for some games.  To avoid bankruptcy, owner Jack Dunn was forced to sell his best players.

Ruth shown, top left, in 1910s-era St. Mary’s team photo, with catcher’s mitt and fielder’s glove, as he both caught and pitched for St. Mary’s.
Ruth shown, top left, in 1910s-era St. Mary’s team photo, with catcher’s mitt and fielder’s glove, as he both caught and pitched for St. Mary’s.


Ruth To Boston 

     About mid-season 1914, in July, Dunn decided to trade Babe Ruth.  Dunn packaged Ruth with two other players and asked Connie Mack of the Philadelphia Athletics for $10,000 for all three players.  Mack refused the offer.  The Cincinnati Reds also passed on the deal.  However, on July 9th or 10th, 1914, Dunn sold the trio to the Boston Red Sox for a reported $25,000.  Ruth then appeared in five games for the Red Sox that season, but was sent down to the minors for the remainder of the season — to the Providence Grays of Providence, Rhode Island.  At the conclusion of the baseball season that year, Ruth married Helen Woodford, a waitress he had met in Boston.  They were married in Ellicott City, Maryland.  In the next three years, Ruth played major league baseball for the Boston Red Sox, primarily as a pitcher, but he was also becoming a much-noted power hitter.

Ruth, bottom right, in his short-lived career with the Baltimore Orioles minor league team for a few months in 1914.
Ruth, bottom right, in his short-lived career with the Baltimore Orioles minor league team for a few months in 1914.
     According to Lee Montville’s book, The Big Bam, Ruth would play in a pair of games in Baltimore in April 1918 in which the Boston Red Sox played Jack Dunn’s minor league Orioles.  Some of Ruth’s old friends from St. Mary’s were likely in the stands, along with a few of the Xaverian Brothers.  Ruth was in his early 20s by this time. Ruth went 4-for-4 against the Orioles — all four of his hits were home runs.   On the following day, he hit two more home runs in his first two at- bats.  In the first game, on April 18, 1918, Ruth went 4-for-4 against the Orioles — all four of his hits were home runs.   He also had two walks that game.  On the following day, April 19th, he hit two more home runs in hist first two at- bats.  No doubt, his old Baltimore pals were pleased.  After that game, the Red Sox went on to play the New York Yankees at the Polo Grounds for opening day of the 1918 baseball season.  Ruth’s first at bat, he hit a lined shot to center field that gave him an inside-the-park home run.  The Red Sox beat the Yankees 10-0.

Babe Ruth in action, 1931, at Oriole Park, Baltimore, Maryland. Photo from Robert F. Kniesche/Kniesche Collection/Maryland Historical Society.
Babe Ruth in action, 1931, at Oriole Park, Baltimore, Maryland. Photo from Robert F. Kniesche/Kniesche Collection/Maryland Historical Society.
     Ruth had become a hitting sensation for the Red Sox, drawing crowds wherever he played.  But Boston sold him to the New York Yankees in 1920, where he would go on to have a colossal career, becoming a para- mount figure in the game, rejuvenating baseball as a business and setting home runs records.   There is more about his life and career at this website.  See, for example, “Babe Ruth Days, 1947-48″,  as well as other sites and numerous books about him. 

Babe Ruth autographing baseball for kids at Baltimore’s Oriole Park, 1936. Photo by LeRoy Merriken.
Babe Ruth autographing baseball for kids at Baltimore’s Oriole Park, 1936. Photo by LeRoy Merriken.
     During his career, Ruth would make appearances from time to time in Baltimore as a player at earlier Oriole Parks and other locations, and some photographs of him playing at these parks surface from time to time.  There are several photographs of Ruth at Oriole Park in the 1930s, for example, some showing him in action, as the one above.

     Another photograph of Ruth at Oriole Park of the 1930s, shows the Babe in his New York Yankee uniform autographing a baseball in the midst of a crowd of kids.  He is standing near the dugout at the old Oriole Park in Baltimore, as four other Yankee players can be seen in the photo as well.  The photo was taken by famous photographer Leroy Merriken.  On the back of the black-and-white sepia image, Merriken wrote in blue pen:  “Babe Ruth 1936, Oriole Park. Photo by LeRoy Merriken.” As of February 2009, one web site  advertised this photo as an “original unpublished Babe Ruth photograph,” calling it “rare and historic,” offering it for sale at $1,200.


Babe’s Statue

Babe Ruth statue at the Eutaw Street (Gate H) entrance of Oriole Park at Camden Yards, roughly behind center field, where the majority of fans enter the park. Statue by Susan Luery, photo, Ed Brown.
Babe Ruth statue at the Eutaw Street (Gate H) entrance of Oriole Park at Camden Yards, roughly behind center field, where the majority of fans enter the park. Statue by Susan Luery, photo, Ed Brown.
     Decades later, Babe Ruth would return to Baltimore in his iconic form.  In fact, in 1991, as the Baltimore Orioles professional baseball team was making plans for a new stadium in Baltimore, there were some who wanted to name the new park after Ruth.  But that plan was nixed, according to press reports of August 1991.  Sometime later, in 1992, the Ruth statue was proposed and eventually approved for Oriole Park at Camden Yards.  Among those supporting the idea were: Larry Lucchino, Baltimore Orioles CEO and president, then overseeing the building of the new ballpark; Peter Angelos, who would become the Orioles new owner in 1993; Michael Gibbons of the Babe Ruth Museum, who directed the project and helped raise funds for it; and the City of Baltimore.

     Susan Luery, a sculptor and Baltimore native, was commissioned to do the Ruth statue.  She produced the 9.5-foot bronze likeness of the young Babe after reading books about him and talking to people with both knowledge of Ruth and baseball.  She also had a look-alike model come into her studio while she worked on the statue.

     “I was intrigued by the concept of Babe Ruth as an American icon — I thought he was amazing,” Luery later said in an interview with The Examiner.  “Going into this, I really didn’t know anything about him, but I learned about his disregard for authority, his joy for life, his talent and sense of humor.  This [Baltimore] is where Babe Ruth got his start.  From a sports aspect, this is important to Baltimore history:  He was more than just a ballplayer.”

     Luery spent seven months forming the 28-inch model statue before creating the large-scale version.  The final statue was nearing completion in late 1994, and ground was broken on its location at Camden Yards on the Babe’s 100th birthday in February 1995.  In May, the statue was officially unveiled at an Oriole’s game at which Luery and Ruth’s daughter,  Julia Ruth Stevens, threw out the game ball.  The 9.5 foot bronze statue portrays a young Ruth leaning on a bat with his left arm, fielder’s glove hanging from his right hand, resting at his hip.  Ruth is gazing out into the future.  “A man looking at his destiny,” is how Susan Luery put it.  “His poise was in the sense of determination that he was a great player,” she said.  “He’s facing out — he had everything in front of him.”  Indeed he did; Ruth’s career rose pretty much straight into the record books from there.

Oriole Park at Camden Yards.  Babe Ruth statue is found roughly behind the centerfield scoreboard on the Eutaw Street promenade side, which runs the length of red brick warehouse behind the outfield stands.
Oriole Park at Camden Yards. Babe Ruth statue is found roughly behind the centerfield scoreboard on the Eutaw Street promenade side, which runs the length of red brick warehouse behind the outfield stands.



Camden Yards

     The Ruth statue is located at the Eutaw Street (Gate H) entrance to Oriole Park at Camden Yards.  The location is roughly behind centerfield, where the majority of fans enter the ballpark.  The location, in fact, is also not far away from where Ruth and his parents lived in the early 1900’s — at 406 Conway Street, in what is now the ballpark’s centerfield.  Babe’s father operated Ruth’s Cafe on the ground floor of their residence at the time, and Babe often used the nearby train station.

     The Eutaw Street promenade is popular with fans who come to the park, as it runs parallel to the long B & O warehouse and separates it from the ballpark’s seating areas.  It’s also in the general area where Baltimore Orioles’ playing legends are honored with large wall numerals, among them, power hitters Frank Robinson (586 career homers) and Eddie Murray (504 career homers). “…I was totally captivated by the magnificent sculp- ture of Babe Ruth…”
                  - Howard Buchanan
Also nearby is the Babe Ruth Museum and Birthplace, the Baltimore row house where Babe Ruth was born, which includes an extensive collection of Babe Ruth memorabilia and exhibits.  The Babe Ruth statue, however, remains a favorite photographic venue and meeting location for many who come to the park.  And for some, the statue is the high point of their visit.

     Howard Buchanan from Cumberland, Maryland, a local official considering Susan Luery in 2005 for a sculpture project in his own town, wrote of his experience coming to Camden Yards to see a baseball game and the Ruth statue:

Museum logo.
Museum logo.

     “In June 2005, my wife, Rosalyn, son John and daughter Beth treated me to a Father’s Day gift of a weekend in Baltimore.  The main item on the schedule was to see a baseball game, Orioles vs. Twins.  The game was only the second Major League game that I had ever seen.  I was impressed with the condition of the facilities, the ball diamond and the general condition of everything in sight.  However, more than by anything else, I was totally captivated by the magnificent sculpture of Babe Ruth.  To any boy growing up in the 1930s and ’40s, Babe Ruth was a national hero, and here in this beautiful park, in this magnificent city where he was born and educated, this icon of American athleticism.  How appropriate…”

See also at this website: “Baseball Stories,” a topics page with links to 12 other baseball stories, including two other stories on Ruth – “Babe Ruth Days, 1947 & 1948”( covers special days honoring Ruth at Yankee Stadium and reviews his career); and “Babe Ruth & Tobacco” (Ruth’s endorsements of various cigar, cigarette, and chewing tobacco products, as well as appearances at a tobacco shop in Boston). For additional stories on sport and sports business at this website see “Annals of Sport.” Thanks for visiting – and please consider supporting this website. Thank you. – Jack Doyle

Please Support
this Website

Donate Now

Thank You

____________________________

Date Posted:  29 March 2009
Last Update:  12 July 2014
Comments to:  jdoyle@pophistorydig.com

Article Citation:
Jack Doyle, “Ruth at Oriole Park, 1930s-2009,”
PopHistoryDig.com, March 29, 2009.

_____________________________



Sources, Links & Additional Information

Rare Babe Ruth baseball trading card issued by the Baltimore News in 1914 when Ruth was briefly a minor league player in Baltimore, shown here in its PSA-graded collector’s case.
Rare Babe Ruth baseball trading card issued by the Baltimore News in 1914 when Ruth was briefly a minor league player in Baltimore, shown here in its PSA-graded collector’s case.
Associated Press, “Baseball; Ruth a Strikeout For Oriole Park,” August 15, 1991.

“Sports Briefly,” The Sun (Baltimore, MD), September 1, 1993, p. 2-D.

David J. Williams, “Sculptor’s Model Fine Tunes His Pitch Being the Babe,” The Sun, June 3, 1994, p. 1-D.

“Q&A,” The Sun, Sports, July 7, 1994, p. 7-C.

“Statue Of Babe Has Just One Catch,”Seattle Times.com, June12, 1995.

Charlie Vascellaro, “‘Pigtown’ Site Is House That Babe Ruth Built,” Washington Weekend, Cover Story, Washington Times, February 5, 2004

Leigh Montville, The Big Bam: The Life and Times of Babe Ruth, New York: Doubleday, 2006.

Elizabeth Skalski, “Babe Statue Labor of Love for Baltimore Sculptor,” The Examiner (Baltimore, MD) and Examiner.com, August 14, 2007.

“Original Unpublished Babe Ruth Photograph by Leroy Merriken,” Vintage Baseball Collectibles, as of February 2009.

Jim Rednour, “Ruth Heralded as Hometown Hero With Statue at Camden Yards,” Monday, December 31, 2007.

“1914 Baltimore News Babe Ruth Rookie Card,” June 25, 2007, WatermelonAntiques.com, explores some comparative auction values of the rare Babe Ruth baseball card.

Tyler Kepner, “Visiting the Birthplace of the Babe,” New York Times, Blogs, April 19, 2008.

“Buchanan Says Oriole Park Likeness of Babe Ruth Helped Inspire Courthouse Project,” Cumberland Times-News (Cumberland, MD), December 13, 2008.

Susan Luery, Sculptor.

“Oriole Park at Camden Yards,” Wikipedia.org.

John Eisenberg, From 33rd Street to Camden Yards: An Oral History of the Baltimore Orioles New York: McGraw-Hill, March 2001.

Jack Doyle, “Babe Ruth Days,1947 & 1948,” PopHistoryDig.com, April 17, 2008.

Thom Loverro, Home of the Game: The Story of Camden Yards, Taylor Trade Publishing, April 1999.

Peter Richmond, Ballpark: Camden Yards and the Building of an American Dream, Fireside, July 2007.

The Babe Ruth Birthplace and Museum, Baltimore, Maryland.

Mike Jensen, “Number 3?”(Babe Ruth), Obit-Mag.com, July 20, 2007.



 

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