The Pop History Dig

“JFK’s 1960 Campaign”
Primaries & Fall Election

After three years of running “unofficially” for president, JFK made it official on January 2nd, 1960, announcing his candidacy for President of the United States.
After three years of running “unofficially” for president, JFK made it official on January 2nd, 1960, announcing his candidacy for President of the United States.
Since 1957, Senator John F. Kennedy had been running “unofficially” for his party’s presidential nomination. For three years he had traveled the country, making speeches, helping other Democrats in their election fights, and building his own campaign organization as he went. Journalist and presidential campaign historian Teddy White would later observe: “No Democrat, not even Adlai Stevenson, spoke in more states, addressed more Jefferson-Jackson Day dinners, participated in more local and mayoralty campaigns of deserving Democrats than did John F. Kennedy.”

By White’s count Kennedy had not only visited every state of the union, but had done something even more important: “[H]is intelligence files bulged with what was possibly the most complete index ever made of the power structure of any national party.” Now, in January 1960, JFK was ready to make it official.

In Washington, on January 2nd in the U.S. Senate Caucus Room, amid a crowd of more than 300 friends, family, Senate colleagues, Democratic party officials and national press, Kennedy made clear his intent to run for and win both the Democratic Presidential Nomination and that fall’s national election.

January 4, 1960: The Herald Republican of Springfield, MA, announces JFK’s formal entry into Presidential race.
January 4, 1960: The Herald Republican of Springfield, MA, announces JFK’s formal entry into Presidential race.
It was a Saturday morning when JFK made his announcement, insuring he would get good newspaper coverage in the Sunday editions. In making his announcement, Kennedy laid down the gauntlet of the Democratic primary elections as the true testing ground, saying those seeking to compete with him should do so in the primaries. He specifically mentioned senators Lyndon Johnson of Texas and Stuart Symington of Missouri, suggesting that if such rivals couldn’t beat him in the primaries they wouldn’t be able to beat Richard Nixon in the fall. For starters, he would enter the March 8th New Hampshire primary and would announce his plans for other state primaries in the weeks that followed. Kennedy also made clear to Democratic leaders that he was running for the Presidential nomination of his party, and under no circumstances would he be a candidate for Vice President, as some had suggested. Senator Hubert Humphrey of Minnesota was also an announced candidate, having made his announcement in late December 1959. Many of the old school Democrats still believed Kennedy was too young, too Catholic, and too inexperienced to receive his party’s nomination. At age 42, he was the youngest presidential candidate in U.S. history.

Jan 1960: JFK being interviewed shortly after announc-ing his candidacy with Jackie by his side, U.S. Senate Caucus room, Wash., D.C. Photo, Hank Walker, Life.
Jan 1960: JFK being interviewed shortly after announc-ing his candidacy with Jackie by his side, U.S. Senate Caucus room, Wash., D.C. Photo, Hank Walker, Life.
As Kennedy campaigned in 1960, he would be buffeted by events of the day. In early February, four black students staged a sit-in at a lunch counter at Greensboro, North Carolina to protest a “whites only serving policy,” a civil rights action that was one of many in the South that had begun in the mid- and late-1950s, and would continue through the 1960s.

In May, an American U-2 spy plane, piloted by Francis Gary Powers, was shot down over Russia with Powers taken prisoner. In late June, a ten nation disarmament conference closed after failing to reach agreement on nuclear arms control. In July, the U.S. cut its sugar imports from Cuba by 95 percent, prompting rebel leader, Fidel Castro to begin confiscating U.S. assets and property there.

In the “space race” that year, the U.S. launched its first weather satellite, Tiros I; the first experimental communications satellite, Echo I; and the first spy satellite, Corona. The Soviets, meanwhile, put another of their Sputnik series into orbit, this one with two dogs on board, returning them safely to earth. In sports, the Summer Olympics were held in Rome where a young boxer from Louisville, Kentucky named Cassius Clay won the light heavyweight gold medal.

“The Remarkable Kennedys,” by Joe McCarthy, published in Feb 1960, was billed as “the dramatic, inside story” of JFK “and his remarkable family.”
“The Remarkable Kennedys,” by Joe McCarthy, published in Feb 1960, was billed as “the dramatic, inside story” of JFK “and his remarkable family.”
Among best-selling books that year were: To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee; Rabbit, Run, by John Updike; and The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich, by William L. Shirer. The first oral contraceptives came into use in 1960 and Elvis Presley had three No. 1 hits that year: “Stuck on You,” “It’s Now or Never,” and “Are You Lonesome Tonight?” It was also 1960 when the famous dance tune, “The Twist,” by Chubby Checker was first released. Other popular songs that year included: “Theme From Summer Place” by Percy Faith; “Cathy’s Clown” by the Everly Brothers; “Stay” by Maurice Williams; “Beyond the Sea” by Bobby Darin; “Georgia on My Mind” by Ray Charles; and “Last Date,” a piano tune by Floyd Cramer.

At the box office that year, Spartacus, Psycho, Exodus, Oceans 11, and Butterfield 8 were among the top grossing films. And several of the actors and actresses appearing in those films would become active JFK supporters, including Tony Curtis, Janet Leigh, Frank Sinatra, and Sammy Davis, Jr.

As the early 1960 race began, the first notable contests for Kennedy and the Democrats came in the Wisconsin and West Virginia primaries – April 5th and May 10th, repectively – both of which Kennedy would win, but not without controversy and considerable effort. Kennedy’s victory over Humphrey in Wisconsin was helped by Catholic voters in some districts, yet his margin of victory was not strong enough in other districts where there were no Catholics. That meant the next primary in West Virginia – a state that was 95 percent Protestant – would be a more telling test of Kennedy’s non-Catholic appeal, watched closely by party bosses.

April 1960: JFK campaigning in the tiny hamlet of Ona, West Virginia prior to that state’s May 10th primary.
April 1960: JFK campaigning in the tiny hamlet of Ona, West Virginia prior to that state’s May 10th primary.
Kennedy scored a solid victory in West Virginia, knocking Humphrey out of the race. The win in West Virginia, plus Wisconsin, gave Kennedy two early primary victories, and also gave his campaign momentum, helping him to win a string of primaries through May and June while wooing important governors and party insiders along the way.

Heading into the July Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles, Kennedy was the odds-on favorite for the nomination, but there were still vestiges of the old “brokered convention” in play, where back-room wheeling and dealing could still generate surprises and dark-horse candidates. Kennedy very definitely had momentum, but he didn’t have a lock on the nomination.

In July 1960, as Democrats gathered at the year-old Sports Arena in Los Angeles for the Democratic National Convention, there were still a number of other candidates who could alter the nomination process, including: Sen. Lyndon Johnson of Texas, the powerful majority leader of the U.S. Senate, who claimed to have 500 or more delegates committed to his candidacy; Sen. Stuart Symington of Missouri, a candidate backed by former president, Harry S. Truman; Adlai Stevenson, the Democrats’ presidential nominee in 1952 and 1956, and a favorite of liberals; and Senators Hubert Humphrey of Minnesota and Wayne Morse of Oregon, JFK primary opponents. There was also California Gov. Pat Brown, regarded a “favorite son” possibility.

25 July 1960: Life magazine features happy convention delegates on its cover, with tagline, “The Demonstration for Jack Kennedy.”
25 July 1960: Life magazine features happy convention delegates on its cover, with tagline, “The Demonstration for Jack Kennedy.”
Life magazine’s July 25th edition, covering the DNC, featured celebrating JFK conventioneers on its cover with the tagline, “The Demonstration for Jack Kennedy.” But the magazine also reported on the convention’s inside politics and how “the Kennedy organization” was showing itself as something of new political phenomenon.

Life’s writers noted that Kennedy was a formidable figure and not merely some Harvard pretty boy. In fact, Kennedy and his 34-year-old brother and campaign manager, Robert, were, according to Life’s reporters, “steam-rolling the crafty old pros of the party with ruthless efficiency….” They were bringing “a new era of American politics” to the Democratic party and delivering “a brand-new and youthful set of owners and operators….” And of course, there was also something else Life’s writers noted: “Kennedy had the magic essential for a candidate, the ability to get votes.”

On July 13, 1960, JFK secured the Democratic nomination on the first ballot. The next day, over the objection of his brother Bobby, organized labor and others, he selected Lyndon Johnson to be his running mate, and the Convention approved. Kennedy would need Texas to win, and that fact above all else, meant Johnson was the best choice. Closing out the convention at the Los Angeles Coliseum with his “New Frontier” speech before TV cameras and a live stadium audience of 50,000 plus, Kennedy and his party went forward, energized for the fall campaign ahead.

July 15, 1960: JFK at the Los Angeles Coliseum speaking before some 52,000 and another 35 million on television. “Today our concern must be with [the] future.... The old era is ending. The old ways will not do…. We stand today on the edge of a New Frontier… ”
July 15, 1960: JFK at the Los Angeles Coliseum speaking before some 52,000 and another 35 million on television. “Today our concern must be with [the] future.... The old era is ending. The old ways will not do…. We stand today on the edge of a New Frontier… ”
Once on the campaign trail, the Kennedy-Johnson ticket covered the entire country, with LBJ barnstorming the South, and Kennedy focusing on a core of some 17 Northeast, industrial, and West Coast states crucial in the electoral arithmetic.

For Kennedy, 1960 was the final stretch in an odyssey that had begun at the 1956 DNC, where he almost won the VP slot. Campaigning as his own man from 1957 on, Kennedy had traveled far and wide, and he had grown as a speaker and campaigner. He had also learned a great deal about the American people and his party. According to aides Kenny O’Donnell and Dave Powers, from late August 1960 until the first Tuesday in November, JFK traveled to speaking appearances and rallies in 237 cities. Nixon, by their count, went to 168 cities.

By Labor Day 1960, when Kennedy formally kicked off his fall campaign in Michigan, his oratory skills had risen to peak form, hitting themes of universal appeal with new and vivid language, inspiring thousands with calls for a better America. By late October, Russell Baker of the New York Times would observe: “…[I]n the last month he has flowered into a magnificent campaigner with a Pied Piper magic over the street crowds, and especially the ladies,“…[Kennedy] has flowered into a magnificent cam- paigner with a Pied Piper magic over the street crowds, and especially the ladies…”
- R. Baker, NY Times
and with a considerable talent for what is ungraciously called rabble-rousing.” That JFK was appealing to women of all ages was no surprise, some calling out their affections for him from the crowds. Life magazine would report in its last issue before the November 8th election: “The blissful fog of feminine adoration surrounding Jack Kennedy — the great phenomenon of the 1960 campaign — grew even thicker in the last days of his tour.” Teddy White would later recount one Southern Senator’s observation that JFK embodied “the best qualities of Elvis and Franklin D. Roosevelt.” But Kennedy’s campaign also garnered the respect of the journalists who followed him.“The consensus of newspapermen who are watching his performance,” wrote syndicated columnist Roscoe Drummond, “‘[is] that he is more articulate than either President Eisenhower or former President Truman, more direct and understandable than Adlai Stevenson, and has much of the charm of Franklin D. Roosevelt.”

JFK’s on-screen appearance during the first Presidential TV debate of Sept 26th, 1960 was believed by some to have been a decisive factor.
JFK’s on-screen appearance during the first Presidential TV debate of Sept 26th, 1960 was believed by some to have been a decisive factor.
The key momentum for the Kennedy campaign, however, did not come from the meet-the-folks retail politics of personal handshakes and Rotary Club speeches – of which there were plenty. Rather, it came in a television studio at station WBBM in Chicago on September 26, 1960. For that was the evening when Kennedy’s movie-star good looks and confident style stole the show from Dick Nixon and got the attention of a nation looking for something new.

“I think the most important moment was in that first television debate with Richard Nixon,” noted Kennedy historian Robert Dallek in a November 2013 National Public Radio interview, “when Kennedy came across as presidential. As someone who was poised, who was witty, charming, handsome and deserved to be president of the United States.”

The 1960 election was a time when television gained as the medium of politics; when image began to play an outsize role in modern culture, and JFK was among the first beneficiaries. There were 85 million television sets in America by then, nearly one set for every two Americans. “When that [first] debate was over,” CBS producer Don Hewitt would later say, “I realized that we didn’t have to wait for an election day. We just elected a president. It all happened on television.” Still, there four TV debates in all, and Nixon regained some ground in the later debates. However, old-fashioned politics were still very much alive in 1960 – when strategic, well-timed, or accidental events could figure into the electoral calculus. And Kennedy’s organization was attuned to such possibilities, if only by the help of perceptive staffers.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. being interviewed by WSB-TV reporter upon leaving the Georgia State Prison at Reidsville, Oct 27, 1960. Civil Rights Digital Library.
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. being interviewed by WSB-TV reporter upon leaving the Georgia State Prison at Reidsville, Oct 27, 1960. Civil Rights Digital Library.
One of those moments came in October 1960, after civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King (MLK) was jailed in a Georgia prison for a trumped-up parole violation following his participation in a student sit-in. Harrison Wofford, then a campaign aide working in the lower bowels of the JFK campaign in Sargent Shriver’s department, but who years later would become a U.S. Senator, learned about the King situation. Wooford advised that Kennedy should become involved. His idea worked its way up the chain of command, first to Shriver, and eventually to JFK, who made a brief call to King’s wife, Coretta Scott King. Bobby Kennedy, however, was furious about the call, believing word of JFK’s action would alienate southern Democrats. Bobby later calmed down and helped secure King’s release after Jack did some back-channel calling to state officials. Meanwhile, Martin Luther King’s father, who some called “Daddy King,” a prominent Baptist minister,After the Kennedys helped MLK get out of jail, “Daddy King,” a Baptist preacher planning to vote for Nixon, promised “a whole suit- case full of votes” for JFK. was quite thankful for the Kennedy involvement and said as much in a public statement to the press a few days later, noting at one point that he had “a whole suitcase full of votes” he would send JFK’s way. Daddy King, a registered Republican, had endorsed Richard Nixon, and previously opposed Kennedy because he was a Catholic. But now the tide had turned, and the Kennedy campaign made the most of it. According to Evan Thomas, writing in his book, Robert Kennedy, A Life, JFK’s campaign, in its final days, published hundreds of thousands of leaflets and handbills that were distributed at black churches and bars. Included was one flyer that read on one side: “Jack Kennedy called Mrs. King,” and on the other side — “Richard Nixon did not.” Many political analysts believe that JFK’s phone call and Bobby’s intercession on behalf of MLK – and the resulting notice these actions received in the black community – figured into the election’s outcome, as black voters shifted to Kennedy in several states and key urban areas. MLK himself, however, never endorsed either candidate.


Home Stretch

JFK in a private moment aboard his campaign plane, The Caroline, which logged thousands of miles during the primary and general election campaigns.
JFK in a private moment aboard his campaign plane, The Caroline, which logged thousands of miles during the primary and general election campaigns.
Toward the end of October 1960, Kennedy was drawing very large and energized crowds, especially in Pennsylvania, a key battleground state that held 32 electoral votes – as many as California and second only to New York. Between October 28th and October 31st, Kennedy and his team made a blitz of cities and towns in the eastern half of Pennsylvania.

Beginning with three morning speeches in Allentown on October 28th, a 20-car Kennedy motorcade then headed north visiting a string of towns, including: Pottsville, McAdoo, Hazleton, Ashley, Sugar Notch, Nanticoke, Plymouth, and finally Wilkes-Barre and Scranton. In Hazleton, thousands jammed Main Street to hear Kennedy, standing shoulder-to-shoulder. In Wilkes-Barre, also on the 28th, an estimated crowd of 30,000 converged on Public Square to hear the senator. These were substantial crowds for small and medium-sized towns. The New York Times, reporting on Kennedy’s campaigning in the region on October 29, 1960, headlined its story, “Kennedy Cheered in Pennsylvania; 500,000 Acclaim Senator as He Motors Through Area of High Unemployment.”

October 28, 1960: JFK – on platform, lower left -- speaks to an overflow crowd jamming the downtown area of Hazelton, Pennsylvania (streets to Kennedy's left, not shown, were equally jammed). The Hazelton stop was among at least a dozen other Pennsylvania towns he visited that day.
October 28, 1960: JFK – on platform, lower left -- speaks to an overflow crowd jamming the downtown area of Hazelton, Pennsylvania (streets to Kennedy's left, not shown, were equally jammed). The Hazelton stop was among at least a dozen other Pennsylvania towns he visited that day.

On the evening of October 28th, it was back to the Philadelphia area for a fundraising dinner and speech, followed the next day by visits throughout the Philadelphia metro area at eight more stops – from Chester and Upper Darby to Roosevelt Field in Norristown and Snellenburg’s Shopping Center in Willow Grove. More Philadelphia area campaigning followed on October 30th and 31st, including stops at a bonds-for-Israel rally, the Raymond Rose apartments, Rayburn Plaza, and Temple University. Thousands had come out for these rallies, as they did in the rain in Philadelphia, Chester, and at the town square in Valley Forge where they heard JFK summon Revolutionary War history: “Men here knew the deadly meaning of danger, but they also preserved the bright hope of opportunity.” In the end, Kennedy’s Pennsylvania blitz paid off: he carried the state and won its 32 electoral votes.

Nov 4, 1960: JFK rides in car with Chicago Mayor, Richard J. Daley, right, during torchlight parade through city.
Nov 4, 1960: JFK rides in car with Chicago Mayor, Richard J. Daley, right, during torchlight parade through city.


“The Irish Prince”

On November 4, 1960, with only five days left until the election, Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley orchestrated a huge torchlight parade for Kennedy through the city, culminating at a Chicago Stadium event that was broadcast over national television (NBC). An estimated 1.5 million came out for the Chicago parade and the rally. At the stadium, Mayor Daley introduced John F. Kennedy to a sold-out audience, as “the Irish Prince.”

In the final week of the race, JFK’s schedule was truly punishing, traveling the breadth of the country, with non-stop campaigning. As aide Kenny O’Donnell would later write, ticking off the stops and how little sleep Kennedy had: “During the closing week of the campaign – Sunday and Monday in Philadelphia, Tuesday in Los Angeles, Wednesday in San Francisco, Thursday in Phoenix, Albuquerque, Amarillo, Wichita Falls and Oklahoma City, Friday in Virginia, Ohio and Chicago, Saturday in New York, Sunday in Connecticut, Long Island, New Jersey and Maine, and… Monday in New England and Boston – he had never gotten four hours of sleep on any night.” But there were some sights to behold in those final days, as O’Donnell would also recount in two episodes, one in Connecticut, late Saturday night November 5th, and the other in Maine, late Sunday night, November 6th:

…We landed in the Caroline [campaign plane] at Bridgeport after midnight and drove from there in a motorcade along Route 8 in the Naugatuck River Valley to Waterbury. All along the road, for more than twenty-seven miles, there were crowds of cheering people, waving torches and red lights, most of them wearing coats over their pajamas and nightgowns, and at the firehouses in every town the fire engines were lines up beside the road with their lights flashing, bells ringing, and sirens wailing.“…All along the road, for more than twenty-seven miles, there were crowds of cheering people, waving torches and red lights, most of them wearing coats over their pajamas and nightgowns…” Although it was almost three o’clock in the morning when we reached Waterbury, there was a roaring crowd of more than forty thousand people in the city square outside the Roger Smith Hotel where Kennedy was to spend the night…

…Then [late Sunday] he flew at night to Lewiston, Maine, arriving there at one-thirty. Lewiston was cold and the airport was dark and empty. The advance man and the few local party leaders who met us at the plane hurried Kennedy into a car and drove him in the the city without saying anything about where he was going. The streets were quiet and empty. He glanced at me questioningly, wondering what he was doing in a freezing cold Maine factory town in the middle of the night when everybody seemed to be in bed. Then we drove into a park where a crowd of more than twenty thousand people were waiting, carrying torchlights. Coming from the cold darkness and stillness of the drive from the airport to the sudden glare of torchlighted area, filled with warmth and excited people, Kennedy was stunned. “My God, isn’t this unbelievable?” he said. Then the crowd recognized him, there was a roar of cheering that could be heard for miles away.

Still, the early November election polls had Nixon and Kennedy pretty much in a dead heat.


JFK and Jackie both voted in Boston on election day then traveled to Hyannis Port to join family, friends, and key campaign staff to await election returns. AP photo.
JFK and Jackie both voted in Boston on election day then traveled to Hyannis Port to join family, friends, and key campaign staff to await election returns. AP photo.


Election Day

On election day, Tuesday November 8th JFK and Jackie voted in Boston then traveled to Hyannis Port, Massachusetts to join family, friends, and core campaign staff to monitor the election returns. As the early vote came in from large cities in the East and Midwest – Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Detroit, and Chicago – Kennedy had a large lead in the popular and electoral vote. It appeared he was headed for certain victory. However, after some premature TV declarations of Kennedy wins in selected states – and some retractions – an hours-long “too-close-to-call” contest set in, stretching late into the night and next day. As later election returns came in during the early a.m hours of November 9th – especially from the rural and suburban Midwest, Western states, and Pacific Coast states – Nixon began to catch up. Some newspapers, including the New York Times, had already prepared “Kennedy Elected” headline copy. But the election was still too close to call.

Nov 8, 1960: Election-night coverage by NBC-TV team of Chet Huntley & David Brinkley at desk, with posted election returns.
Nov 8, 1960: Election-night coverage by NBC-TV team of Chet Huntley & David Brinkley at desk, with posted election returns.
By 3 a.m, Eastern Time, Kennedy’s popular vote lead – which had been about 2.3 million votes at midnight – had nearly evaporated, and some commentators were saying he might win the presidency with the electoral vote, but lose the popular vote. When Nixon appeared with his wife at the podium in the Ambassador Hotel at 12:30 a.m. Pacific Time (3:30 a.m. EST), four key states were still undecided — California, Illinois, Michigan, and Minnesota. Only if Kennedy lost all four of these states could Nixon win. As journalist Teddy White put it: “[T]hough Nixon had almost certainly lost, Kennedy had yet not definitely won.” In a televised address from the Ambassador Hotel that night, with a tearful Pat by his side, Nixon told the crowd, “[A]s I look at the board here; while there are still some results to come in,…if the present trend continues, Senator Kennedy will be the next President of the United States.” This wasn’t a Nixon concession, however – as one of his aids, Herb Klein, followed Nixon to say just that. On the East coast, Kennedy’s people, watching the telecast, were furious. But JFK himself, also watching, said: “Why should he concede? I wouldn’t.” And with that, at nearly 4. a.m., JFK went to bed to await the outcome.

Nov 9, 1960 a.m. edition of Los Angeles Times has JFK “nearing victory” amid Nixon’s conditional concession.
Nov 9, 1960 a.m. edition of Los Angeles Times has JFK “nearing victory” amid Nixon’s conditional concession.
By 6:30 a.m. EST the next morning, at NBC-TV in New York, Chet Huntley and David Brinkley, having covered the returns for12 straight hours, were still on the air, but had no official final result to broadcast. At around 11:00 a.m. EST on Wednesday morning, November 9th, Nixon still hadn’t conceded. JFK at that point was believed to be 11 electoral votes short of victory, even though at least one TV network had called the election for Kennedy earlier that morning. At about 12:30 EST, Minnesota was added to JFK’s column, which then put him over the top. Within 10 minutes or so of that announcement on TV, a telegram for JFK arrived at Hyannis Port from Nixon: “I want to repeat through this wire congratulations and best wishes I extended to you on television last night. I know that you have united support of all Americans as you lead this nation in the cause of peace and freedom during the next four years.” The Nixon telegram was also read about the same time before TV cameras by Nixon aide Herb Klein. Kennedy had defeated Nixon in one of the closest presidential elections of the twentieth century. In the national popular vote Kennedy led Nixon by just two-tenths of one percent (49.7% to 49.5%), while in the electoral vote – with 269 needed to win – Kennedy received 303 and Nixon 219.

Nov 9th, 1960: Famous photo of JFK with daughter Caroline awaiting final election results at Hyannis Port.
Nov 9th, 1960: Famous photo of JFK with daughter Caroline awaiting final election results at Hyannis Port.
The 1960 Kennedy campaign, in many ways, was a watershed in modern political campaigning. Kennedy and his team broke the mold of what had gone before and set a new style that blended both old and new, tapped into popular culture (e.g., Sinatra’s Rat Pack), and made the most of television. Historian Robert Dallek has stated that no one has yet created a new template the way Kennedy did.

What follows below is an abbreviated timeline of JFK’s campaigning in 1960 – from the primaries of early 1960, through the Democratic National Convention (DNC) in July, to the final fall campaign, September through election day. The left hand column includes a shorthand listing of known campaign stops, speech titles or general topics, meetings, endorsements, and related press and other activities during 1960. The right hand column includes related photos, magazine covers, newspaper clips and other items from the 1960 campaign. Additional photos and campaign information appear below the timeline, in “Sources, Links & Additional Information” at the bottom of this article. 

See also at this website additional stories on JFK’s “road to the White House,” including separate stories on his campaigning in 1957, 1958, and 1959, as well as other related stories such as, “The Jack Pack, 1958-1960.” Thanks for visiting – and please consider supporting this website.
Thank you. - Jack Doyle

 

JFK’s 1960 Presidential Campaign
Campaign Stops, Speech Topics, Meetings, Press, Etc.,.
January-November 1960

 

Jan 2, 1960: Newsreel title screen for story about JFK’s announcement. Newsreels were then used in theaters.
Jan 2, 1960: Newsreel title screen for story about JFK’s announcement. Newsreels were then used in theaters.
Jan 14, 1960: JFK outlines his strategy for the presidency at the National Press Club in Wash., D.C.  Photo, UPI.
Jan 14, 1960: JFK outlines his strategy for the presidency at the National Press Club in Wash., D.C. Photo, UPI.
Jan 1960: JFK &  Jackie campaigning in New Hampshire.
Jan 1960: JFK & Jackie campaigning in New Hampshire.
Jan 25, 1960: Nashua Telegraph headlines suggest a favorable showing in New Hampshire after JFK and wife Jackie visited the state in January.
Jan 25, 1960: Nashua Telegraph headlines suggest a favorable showing in New Hampshire after JFK and wife Jackie visited the state in January.
Feb 6, 1960: JFK makes a quick trip to Charleston, WV to file for the state’s May 10th primary election where he will face Sen. Hubert Humphrey. Kennedy, at the desk of State Secretary Joe Burdette, is talking with the press. At left is Neil Boggs of WSAZ.  Photo, WV State Archives.
Feb 6, 1960: JFK makes a quick trip to Charleston, WV to file for the state’s May 10th primary election where he will face Sen. Hubert Humphrey. Kennedy, at the desk of State Secretary Joe Burdette, is talking with the press. At left is Neil Boggs of WSAZ. Photo, WV State Archives.
Feb 8, 1960: Frank Sinatra with JFK outside The Sands hotel in Las Vegas where Kennedy stayed during a campaign swing. Sinatra would go “all out” for JFK in 1960. Click for Sinatra & “Jack Pack” story.
Feb 8, 1960: Frank Sinatra with JFK outside The Sands hotel in Las Vegas where Kennedy stayed during a campaign swing. Sinatra would go “all out” for JFK in 1960. Click for Sinatra & “Jack Pack” story.
Feb 8, 1960: JFK arriving in Roseburg, Oregon, where he is met by a local delegation that includes Edward Murphy (c), his Douglas County campaign manager, and  State Rep. W.O. Kelsey (r). Photo, The Oregonian.
Feb 8, 1960: JFK arriving in Roseburg, Oregon, where he is met by a local delegation that includes Edward Murphy (c), his Douglas County campaign manager, and State Rep. W.O. Kelsey (r). Photo, The Oregonian.
Feb 17, 1960: JFK, at the Hotel Retlaw in Fond du Lac, WI, where a large photo of his likeness was mounted behind him, spoke on the topic of “Water Pollution,” noting that in 1959 the beaches of Milwaukee had been closed because the water was unsafe and unhealthy.
Feb 17, 1960: JFK, at the Hotel Retlaw in Fond du Lac, WI, where a large photo of his likeness was mounted behind him, spoke on the topic of “Water Pollution,” noting that in 1959 the beaches of Milwaukee had been closed because the water was unsafe and unhealthy.
JFK, on a winter visit to Manchester, NH, greets student supporters at St. Anselm’s College who have brought along a donkey, symbol of the Democratic Party.
JFK, on a winter visit to Manchester, NH, greets student supporters at St. Anselm’s College who have brought along a donkey, symbol of the Democratic Party.
Los Angeles Times headline announces JFK and Nixon victories in the March 8, 1960 New Hampshire primary.
Los Angeles Times headline announces JFK and Nixon victories in the March 8, 1960 New Hampshire primary.
Vying presidential hopefuls in the 1960 Wisconsin Democratic primary, Humphrey & Kennedy, shown on the March 28, 1960 cover of ‘Life’ magazine as they compete for, among other interests, the dairy farm vote.
Vying presidential hopefuls in the 1960 Wisconsin Democratic primary, Humphrey & Kennedy, shown on the March 28, 1960 cover of ‘Life’ magazine as they compete for, among other interests, the dairy farm vote.
March 30, 1960: Campaigning early a.m. at the Manitowoc Shipyards in Wisconsin, JFK greets arriving workers and brothers, Ralph and Berlin Schroeder.
March 30, 1960: Campaigning early a.m. at the Manitowoc Shipyards in Wisconsin, JFK greets arriving workers and brothers, Ralph and Berlin Schroeder.
April 3rd, 1960: JFK watching a TV playback of an earlier TV appearance in Milwaukee, Wisconsin leading up to the April 5th Wisconsin primary.  AP photo.
April 3rd, 1960: JFK watching a TV playback of an earlier TV appearance in Milwaukee, Wisconsin leading up to the April 5th Wisconsin primary. AP photo.
April 5, 1960: JFK & team working the phones on WI primary night. Behind JFK from left: Pierre Salinger, Kennedy O’Donnell and Larry O’Brien.  RFK is on the extreme right.
April 5, 1960: JFK & team working the phones on WI primary night. Behind JFK from left: Pierre Salinger, Kennedy O’Donnell and Larry O’Brien. RFK is on the extreme right.
April 5th, 1960: CBS newsman Walter Cronkite interviews JFK during the Wisconsin primary vote.
April 5th, 1960: CBS newsman Walter Cronkite interviews JFK during the Wisconsin primary vote.
April 1960: As JFK stepped off his campaign plane at the Tucson Arizona Municipal Airport, he was greeted by about 150 supporters, some waving “Viva! Kennedy” placards. He was also given a sombrero and a cowboy hat. Photo, Tucson Citizen.
April 1960: As JFK stepped off his campaign plane at the Tucson Arizona Municipal Airport, he was greeted by about 150 supporters, some waving “Viva! Kennedy” placards. He was also given a sombrero and a cowboy hat. Photo, Tucson Citizen.
April 9th, 1960: JFK, Rep. Stewart Udall, and guest enjoy a light moment during a Democratic luncheon in Tucson, AZ. Udall would later become Kennedy’s Sec. of the Interior. Tucson Citizen photo.
April 9th, 1960: JFK, Rep. Stewart Udall, and guest enjoy a light moment during a Democratic luncheon in Tucson, AZ. Udall would later become Kennedy’s Sec. of the Interior. Tucson Citizen photo.
April 1960: JFK campaigning in rural West Virginia in advance of the state's May 10th primary.
April 1960: JFK campaigning in rural West Virginia in advance of the state's May 10th primary.
April 1960: JFK meeting with a group of coal miners near Mullens, West Virginia during a shift change while campaigning in Logan County during the West Virginia primary race.
April 1960: JFK meeting with a group of coal miners near Mullens, West Virginia during a shift change while campaigning in Logan County during the West Virginia primary race.
May 1960: Part of the JFK story being disseminated during the election was Kennedy’s WWII heroics, put forward here in a “Man’s Magazine” cover story.
May 1960: Part of the JFK story being disseminated during the election was Kennedy’s WWII heroics, put forward here in a “Man’s Magazine” cover story.
May 15th: JFK threw opening day baseball for Little League teams at Riverside ballpark in Portland, OR. Mike Gefroh caught ball and asked JFK to autograph it.
May 15th: JFK threw opening day baseball for Little League teams at Riverside ballpark in Portland, OR. Mike Gefroh caught ball and asked JFK to autograph it.
June 3, 1960: In Michigan, Mackinac Islanders welcome JFK, awarding him a key to the island. Gov. Williams introduced JFK to the crowd. Photo, Detroit News
June 3, 1960: In Michigan, Mackinac Islanders welcome JFK, awarding him a key to the island. Gov. Williams introduced JFK to the crowd. Photo, Detroit News
June 16, 1960: JFK makes guest appearance on Jack Paar’s Tonight Show. Click for video.
June 16, 1960: JFK makes guest appearance on Jack Paar’s Tonight Show. Click for video.
June 19, 1960:  U.S. Rep. George McGovern, right, joins JFK on the campaign trail in Sioux Falls, S.D.
June 19, 1960: U.S. Rep. George McGovern, right, joins JFK on the campaign trail in Sioux Falls, S.D.
July 2, 1960: A week before the DNC, former President, Harry Truman said Kennedy was “too young” & “not ready” and charged the DNC was “rigged” in his favor.
July 2, 1960: A week before the DNC, former President, Harry Truman said Kennedy was “too young” & “not ready” and charged the DNC was “rigged” in his favor.
July 9, 1960: JFK arriving in Los Angeles for the Democratic National Convention, where he is the front- runner for the Democratic Presidential nomination.
July 9, 1960: JFK arriving in Los Angeles for the Democratic National Convention, where he is the front- runner for the Democratic Presidential nomination.
July 13th: North Carolina delegates and LBJ supporters, Gov. Luther Hodges (holding paper) and Senator Sam Ervin Jr., right, at the DNC. Rumor had it that Kennedy was slipping in his bid for the nomination, as Southern delegates battled over civil rights and other issues.
July 13th: North Carolina delegates and LBJ supporters, Gov. Luther Hodges (holding paper) and Senator Sam Ervin Jr., right, at the DNC. Rumor had it that Kennedy was slipping in his bid for the nomination, as Southern delegates battled over civil rights and other issues.
July 14th, 1960: Los Angeles Times banner news head-line announcing JFK’s nomination victory at the DNC.
July 14th, 1960: Los Angeles Times banner news head-line announcing JFK’s nomination victory at the DNC.
July 1960: Classic photo of LBJ, RFK & JFK during Johnson’s VP selection. Photo,  Jacques Lowe
July 1960: Classic photo of LBJ, RFK & JFK during Johnson’s VP selection. Photo, Jacques Lowe
Aug 14,1960: JFK speaks at FDR Historic Home Site on 25th Anniversary of Social Security Act. Photo, NPS
Aug 14,1960: JFK speaks at FDR Historic Home Site on 25th Anniversary of Social Security Act. Photo, NPS
Aug 14, 1960: JFK admiring bust of FDR while touring the FDR Library during his visit to Hyde Park, NY.
Aug 14, 1960: JFK admiring bust of FDR while touring the FDR Library during his visit to Hyde Park, NY.
Aug 20, 1960: Cover for major farm conference in Des Moines, IA, with JFK& LBJ attending.  JFK pledges Democratic action to raise farm income to “full parity” and “preserve family farming as a way of life.”
Aug 20, 1960: Cover for major farm conference in Des Moines, IA, with JFK& LBJ attending. JFK pledges Democratic action to raise farm income to “full parity” and “preserve family farming as a way of life.”
Aug 26, 1960: JFK waves to crowd as he leaves Cobo Hall in Detroit following speech to the VFW National Conven-tion.  Photo, Tony Spina/Walter Reuther Library
Aug 26, 1960: JFK waves to crowd as he leaves Cobo Hall in Detroit following speech to the VFW National Conven-tion. Photo, Tony Spina/Walter Reuther Library
Sept 6, 1960: JFK in Spokane, WA reading about his proposed  “wheat plan” in the Spokane Daily Chronicle.
Sept 6, 1960: JFK in Spokane, WA reading about his proposed “wheat plan” in the Spokane Daily Chronicle.
Sept 8-9, 1960: JFK speaking from back of train during two-day California whistlestop tour. Photo, C. Capa
Sept 8-9, 1960: JFK speaking from back of train during two-day California whistlestop tour. Photo, C. Capa
Sept 13: JFK campaigning with LBJ, in Dallas, Texas.
Sept 13: JFK campaigning with LBJ, in Dallas, Texas.
Sept 16th: Crowd fills Penn Square, Lancaster, PA, to hear JFK speak. He also stopped at nearby Columbia, PA, as well as Reading, York and Lebanon, PA that day.
Sept 16th: Crowd fills Penn Square, Lancaster, PA, to hear JFK speak. He also stopped at nearby Columbia, PA, as well as Reading, York and Lebanon, PA that day.
Poster announcing visit of JFK to the York Fair, in York, PA on September 16, 1960.
Poster announcing visit of JFK to the York Fair, in York, PA on September 16, 1960.
September 22, 1960: JFK, in backseat of Pontiac convertible, talks with farmer James Cox during a visit to his farm in Fort Dodge, Iowa. AP photo.
September 22, 1960: JFK, in backseat of Pontiac convertible, talks with farmer James Cox during a visit to his farm in Fort Dodge, Iowa. AP photo.
Sept 26, 1960: JFK and Richard Nixon appear in the first nationally-televised presidential debate, which many believe Kennedy won. With some 70 million viewers, that debate gave an enormous boost to Kennedy’s campaign. Up to 20 million fewer viewers watched the remaining 3 debates, in which Nixon fared better.
Sept 26, 1960: JFK and Richard Nixon appear in the first nationally-televised presidential debate, which many believe Kennedy won. With some 70 million viewers, that debate gave an enormous boost to Kennedy’s campaign. Up to 20 million fewer viewers watched the remaining 3 debates, in which Nixon fared better.
Sept 28, 1960: Erie, PA “Daily Times” headline: “40,000 Greet Kennedy in Erie,” with photo of JFK & crowd.
Sept 28, 1960: Erie, PA “Daily Times” headline: “40,000 Greet Kennedy in Erie,” with photo of JFK & crowd.
Sept 29: Female voter in Schenectady, NY makes her preference known. Jackie’s campaigning was limited by her pregnancy, though she made early and late campaign appearances, and was a popular and valued campaigner.
Sept 29: Female voter in Schenectady, NY makes her preference known. Jackie’s campaigning was limited by her pregnancy, though she made early and late campaign appearances, and was a popular and valued campaigner.
Campaign poster for JFK appearances on Oct 10th, 1960 at Gateway Center & Syria Mosque in Pittsburgh, PA.
Campaign poster for JFK appearances on Oct 10th, 1960 at Gateway Center & Syria Mosque in Pittsburgh, PA.
Oct. 10, 1960: JFK addressing crowd at the LaGrange-Callaway Airport in Georgia, and would later visit Warm Springs, GA, former FDR retreat. Photo, Atlanta Journal
Oct. 10, 1960: JFK addressing crowd at the LaGrange-Callaway Airport in Georgia, and would later visit Warm Springs, GA, former FDR retreat. Photo, Atlanta Journal
October 10th, 1960 edition of Newsweek features JFK-Nixon TV debates on its cover along with “stormy K,” a reference to Soviet Premier, Nikita Khrushchev.
October 10th, 1960 edition of Newsweek features JFK-Nixon TV debates on its cover along with “stormy K,” a reference to Soviet Premier, Nikita Khrushchev.
October 19th, 1960: JFK & Jackie riding in motorcade during tickertape parade in New York City.
October 19th, 1960: JFK & Jackie riding in motorcade during tickertape parade in New York City.
October 24th edition of “Rockford Register-Republic” chronicles JFK Illinois campaign visit, mentioning plans for a 5th national TV debate that never came about.
October 24th edition of “Rockford Register-Republic” chronicles JFK Illinois campaign visit, mentioning plans for a 5th national TV debate that never came about.
Oct 31: JFK campaigns in downtown Philadelphia, PA near Citizens for Kennedy-Johnson hdqtrs, 1431 Chestnut St. Photo, Evening Bulletin/Temple Univ.
Oct 31: JFK campaigns in downtown Philadelphia, PA near Citizens for Kennedy-Johnson hdqtrs, 1431 Chestnut St. Photo, Evening Bulletin/Temple Univ.
Nov 1, 1960: JFK in blizzard of confetti in downtown Los Angeles during motorcade up Broadway, where it took more than 1 hour to travel 20 blocks.  AP photo
Nov 1, 1960: JFK in blizzard of confetti in downtown Los Angeles during motorcade up Broadway, where it took more than 1 hour to travel 20 blocks. AP photo
Nov 4, 1960: Headline from ‘Chicago Daily News’ touting big Mayor Daley-backed torchlight parade and stadium rally for JFK that would draw 1.5 million.
Nov 4, 1960: Headline from ‘Chicago Daily News’ touting big Mayor Daley-backed torchlight parade and stadium rally for JFK that would draw 1.5 million.
Nov 7, 1960: JFK coming into Boston with a police escort after days of campaigning throughout New England. He would make a final campaign speech at the Boston Garden and another on national TV, ending his campaign.
Nov 7, 1960: JFK coming into Boston with a police escort after days of campaigning throughout New England. He would make a final campaign speech at the Boston Garden and another on national TV, ending his campaign.
November 9, 1960: A beaming Jackie Kennedy and a happy JFK, during his acceptance speech  at the Hyannis Armory in Massachusetts following the long election night.
November 9, 1960: A beaming Jackie Kennedy and a happy JFK, during his acceptance speech at the Hyannis Armory in Massachusetts following the long election night.

January 1960

Jan 2: Wash., DC, Announces Candidacy
Jan 2: Universal-International Newsreel
Jan 2: Waltham, MA, Eleanore Roosevelt
Jan 3: Boston, MA, w/Advisory Group
Jan 3: Wash., DC, NBC’s Meet The Press
Jan 4: New York, NY
Jan 4: Wash. DC, Dinner w/ Joe Alsop
Jan 5: Wash., Dinner w/Ben & Toni Bradlee
Jan 5-6: Ohio Gov. Mike DiSalle for JFK
Jan 5: NH Campaign Office Opens
Jan 6: Wash., Dave Garroway TV filming
Jan 6: Wash., Women’s Nat’l Press Club
Jan 7: Parkersburg, WV, Campaign Mtg
Jan 7: Pres. Eisenhower, State of the Union
Jan 8: New York, Lunch w/ Look Editors
Jan 8: Wash, DC, Foreign Press Assoc.
Jan 8: ‘Kansans for Kennedy’ in Topeka
Jan 9: Nixon Announces Candidacy
Jan 9: Wash., DC, AFL-CIO Reception
Jan 11: Wash., DC, Board of Overseers
Jan 12: Wash., Walter Reuther Mtg.
Jan 12: Wash., Mass. Labor Leaders
Jan 13: Wash., Rep. Torbert MacDonald
Jan 14: Wash., DC, National Press Club
Jan 15: Louisville, KY
Jan 15-18: Palm Beach, FL, R&R
Jan 19: CA Gov. Pat Brown is Candidate
Jan 19: Wash., Lunch w/Joe Alsop
Jan 19: Wash., Bill Gillrick, Life
Jan 19: Wash., Franklin Roosevelt Jr.
Jan 20: Wash., John Oakes, NY Times
Jan 21: Milwaukee, WI with Jackie
Jan 21: Milwaukee Press Conference
Jan 22: Milwaukee, Pfister Hotel
Jan 22: Wash., DC, Gov. M. Williams
Jan 22: Wash., DC, Gov. Pat Brown
Jan 22: Wash., DC, Fundraising
Jan 23: Wash., National Committee
Jan 23: Wash., Pres. Kick-Off Dinner
Jan 24: Cambridge, MA, Harvard Club
Jan 24: Boston, MA, Jeff-Jackson Dinner
Jan 24: Nashua, NH, City Hall
Jan 24: Nashua, NH, Rotary Club
Jan 25: Manchester, NH
Jan 26: Baltimore, MD, Gov. Tawes
Jan 27: Omaha, NE, Labor Recep/Rally
Jan 28: Wash, DC, AP Photographers
Jan 28: Wash., Radio Interview/NY
Jan 30: Salt Lake City, UT, Luncheon
Jan 30: Salt Lake City, Press Conference
Jan 30: Salt Lake City, Later Day Saints
Jan 30: Salt Lake City, KCFX-TV Show
Jan 30: Salt Lake City, Labor Leaders
Jan 30: Salt Lake City, Dem Reception
Jan 30: Salt Lake City, Roosevelt Ball
Jan 31: Reno, NV, Gov’s Reception
Jan 31: Carson City, NV

 
February 1960

Feb 1: Carson City, NV, State Legislature
Feb 2: Annapolis, Enters MD Primary
Feb 4: Indianapolis, Enters IN Primary
Feb 4: Gary, IN, Hotel Gary Reception
Feb 4: Gary, Int’l Institute, Benefit Dinner
Feb 5: Gary, Lake County Women’s Club
Feb 5: Gary, Hotel Gary, Press Conf.
Feb 5: E. Chicago, IN, Dem. Luncheon
Feb 5: Gary, IN, U.S. Steel Tour
Feb 5: Terre Haute, IN, Dem Reception
Feb 5: Terre Haute, WTBI-TV
Feb 5: Terre Haute, State Teacher’s Col.
Feb 6: Charleston, WV, Primary filing
Feb 6: Bismark, ND, Hotel Patterson
Feb 6: Bismark, KYFR-TV Interview
Feb 6: Bismark, ND, Young Dems Lunch
Feb 6: Jamestown, ND, Press Conf.
Feb 6: Stutsman County (ND) Dems
Feb 7: Albuquerque, NM, Western Conf.
Feb 7: Albuquerque, New Mexico Univ.
Feb 7: Albuquerque, Dem. Luncheon
Feb 7: Albuquerque, Civic Auditorium
Feb 7: Las Vegas, Sands Hotel, Press
Feb 8: Las Vegas, Conv. Center Spch
Feb 8: Conv. Center Gold Room Recep.
Feb 8: Las Vegas, Sands Hotel
Feb 9: Roseburg, OR, Dem. Committee
Feb 9: Roseburg, Visit Lumber Mill
Feb 9: Roseburg, ‘Better Housing’ Spch
Feb 9: Corvallis, OR, Dem. Committee
Feb 9: Corvallis, Dem. Women
Feb 9: Corvallis, Benton Hotel Spch
Feb 9: Albany, OR, St. Mary’s Hall
Feb 9: Portland, OR, Multnomah Hotel
Feb 10: Portland, Press Conference
Feb 10: Portland, Chamber of Commerce
Feb 10: Newport, OR, Yaquina Harbor
Feb 10: Newport, Georgia Pacific Mill
Feb 10: Newport, Dem. Dinner
Feb 10: Corvallis, OR, Oregon St. Univ.
Feb 10: Portland Airport Reception
Feb 10: Portland-to-Pullman, WA
Feb 10: Pullman, Wash. State Univ.
Feb 11: Spokane, WA, Gonzaga Univ.
Feb 11: Spokane, Whitworth College
Feb 11: Spokane, Labor Council
Feb 11: Spokane, WA, Dem Club Dinner
Feb 12: Palo Alto, CA, Stanford Univ.
Feb 12: Fresno, CA, Dem Clubs Convnt.
Feb 12: Fresno, Hotel Fresno Reception
Feb 13: NY, NY, Dem. State Com. Dinner
Feb 16: Ft Atkinson, Wisconsin
Feb 16: Ft Atkinson, Whitewater College
Feb 16: Lake Geneva, WI. Town Tour
Feb 16: Kenosha, WI, ‘Senior Citizens’
Feb 16: Kenosha, Campaign Song Aired
Feb 16: Madison, WI, Press Conference
Feb 17: Port Washington, WI
Feb 17: West Bend, WI
Feb 17: Mayville, WI, City Hall
Feb 17: Beaver Dam, WI, ‘Dairy Program’
Feb 17: Fond Du Lac, ‘Water Pollution’
Feb 18: Oshkosh, WI, Wisconsin Axle
Feb 18: Oshkosh, Oshkosh Overall plant
Feb 18: Oshkosh, WI, Oshkosh St. College
Feb 18: DePere, WI, St. Norbert’s College
Feb 18: Appleton, WI, Town Center
Feb 18: Green Bay, WI, Champion Paper
Feb 18: Green Bay, WI, ‘Minimum Wage’
Feb 19: Berlin, New Hampshire
Feb 19: Berlin, White Mnt Lumber Co.
Feb 19: Berlin, Burgess Mill
Feb 19: Berlin, Cascade Plant
Feb 19: Berlin, Granite State Lumber Co,
Feb 19: Hannover, NH, Dartmouth College
Feb 19: Lebanon, NH
Feb 19: Claremont, NH, Hotel Moody
Feb 19: Claremont, City Hall Reception
Feb 20: Hartford, CT, Gov’s Mansion
Feb 20: Hartford, Jeff-Jackson Dinner
Feb 24: Madison, WI, ‘Natural Resources’
Feb 24: Madison, WI, East Side Optimists
Feb 24: Portage, WI, ‘Forest Research’
Feb 25: Wausau, WI, ‘Unshared Abundance’
Feb 25: Antigo, WI, ‘Rural Elec Co-ops’
Feb 25: Medford, WI, ‘Natural Resources’
Feb 25: Abbotsford, WI, ‘Social Security’
Feb 26: Eau Claire, WI, ‘…Tight Money’
Feb 26: Chippewa Falls, WI, ‘Ag Research’
Feb 26: Bloomer, WI, ‘REA Co-ops’
Feb 26: Durand, WI, ‘Dairy Program’
Feb 29: U.S. Senate, ‘Investment for Peace’

 
March 1960

Mar 4: Indianapolis, IN, File for Primary
Mar 4: Indianapolis, Press Conference
Mar 4: Indianapolis, Visit Campaign Hqtrs
Mar 4: Hutchinson, KS, Democratic Dinner
Mar 4: Gallup Poll: JFK 50%, Nixon 50%
Mar 5: Laconia, NH, Tavern Hotel Brk’fst
Mar 5: Franklin, NH, Reception
Mar 5: Concord, NH, Highway Hotel Recep.
Mar 5: Suncook, NH, Legion Sq. Reception
Mar 5: Manchester, NH, Champagne Mkt.
Mar 5: Manchester, St. Anselm’s College
Mar 5: Nashua, NH, Democratic Dinner
Mar 6: Berlin, NH, City Hall
Mar 6: Hanover, NH, Dartmouth College
Mar 6: Lebanon, NH, City Hall
Mar 6: Dartmouth College Speech
Mar 6: Claremont, NH, City Hall Recep.
Mar 7: Rochester, NH
Mar 7: Rochester, Hubbard Shoe Co.
Mar 7: Somersworth, NH
Mar 7: Somersworth, G.E. Meter Plant
Mar 7: Durham, NH, Lunch, Univ. of NH
Mar 7: Durham, New Hampshire Hall
Mar 7: Durham, Radio Q&A, WNDR
Mar 7: Newington, NH, Simplex Wire Co.
Mar 7: Portsmouth, NH, Press Conference
Mar 7: Dover, NH, City Hall Reception
Mar 8: JFK Wins NH Primary
Mar 9: Madison, WI, Press Conference
Mar 9: Baraboo, WI, ‘Forest Products’
Mar 9: Reedsburg, WI, ‘Dairy Income’
Mar 9: Mauston, WI, ‘National Defense’
Mar 9: Sparta, WI
Mar 9: La Crosse, WI, ‘Distressed Areas’
Mar 10: Black Falls, WI
Mar 10: Fairchild, WI, Neillsville H.S.
Mar 10: Marshfield, WI
Mar 10: Stevens Pt., WI, ‘Farm Credit’
Mar 11: Manawa, WI, Coffee Hour
Mar 11: Clintonville, WI
Mar 11: Shawano, WI, ‘Dairy Industry’
Mar 11: New London, WI
Mar 11: Neemah, WI
Mar 11: Meesha, WI
Mar 11: Appleton, WI, Nat. Resources
Mar 12: Wash, DC, Gridiron Dinner
Mar 14: Wash., Building Trades Conf.
Mar 15: Nat’l Veterans For Kennedy
Mar 16: Charleston, WV, Press Conf.
Mar 16: Madison, WI, ‘Disarmament’
Mar 16: Madison, Univ of Wisconsin
Mar 16: Madison, Businessmen’s Club
Mar 17: Cornell, WI, ‘REA Co-ops’
Mar 17: Ladysmith, WI
Mar 17: Park Falls, WI
Mar 17: Mellen, WI
Mar 17: Montreal, WI
Mar 17: Hurley, WI
Mar 17: Ashland, WI
Mar 18: Washburn, WI,
Mar 18: Hayward. WI
Mar 18: Shall Lake, WI
Mar 18: Minong, WI
Mar 18: Gordon, WI
Mar 18: Superior, WI. ‘The Unemployed’
Mar 19: Milwaukee, WI, Press Conf.
Mar 19: Mukwonago, WI, Coffee Hour
Mar 19: Burlington, WI
Mar 19: Racine, WI, Young Democrats
Mar 19: Hayward, WI
Mar 19: Delavan, WI, ‘Small Business’
Mar 19: Janesville, WI, ‘Ag Research’
Mar 20: Milwaukee, WI, ‘Right to Vote’
Mar 20: Marionette, WI, ‘Farm Credit’
Mar 21: Indianapolis, IN, Primary Cert.
Mar 23: Milwaukee, NW Mutual Co.
Mar 23: Milwaukee, G.E. Plant Tour
Mar 23: Milwaukee, Schlitz Plant
Mar 23: Milwaukee, American Motors
Mar 23: Milwaukee, Jewish Com. Center
Mar 24: Sen. Symington Enters Race
Mar 24: Milwaukee, Telephone Co.
Mar 24: Milwaukee, Univ of WI / ‘Berlin’
Mar 24: Milwaukee, Miller Brewing
Mar 24: Kenosha, WI, Am. Motors Plant
Mar 24: Racine, WI, Reception
Mar 25: Hillsboro, WI, High School Spch
Mar 25: Gays Mills, WI
Mar 25: Muscoda, WI
Mar 25: Lancaster, WI, REA County Mtg.
Mar 25: Milwaukee, Univ of WI / ‘Cuba’
Mar 26: Detroit, MI, Dem Midwest Conf.
Mar 26: Cadillac, MI, Press Conference
Mar 27: Detroit, UAW Rally /‘Forand Bill’
Mar 28: Life cover story, WI Primary
Mar 29: Milwaukee, WI
Mar 29: Hudson, WI, ‘Ag Research’
Mar 30: Manitowoc, WI, ‘Farm Co-ops’
Mar 30: Manitowoc, Shipyard Workers
Mar 31: Oconomowoc, WI, ‘Nat’l Forests’

 
April 1960

Apr 1: Dodgeville, WI, ‘Fighting Crime’
Apr 1: Beloit, WI, ‘Social Security’
Apr 2: Milwaukee, WI, ‘This Campaign’
Apr 2: Milwaukee, Assoc Student Councils
Apr 3: Milwaukee, ‘American Labor’
Apr 4: Milwaukee, Univ of WI, ‘Berlin’
Apr 5: JFK Wins Wisconsin Primary
Apr 5-6: Kennedy team gathers in WV
Apr 6: JFK at home, Georgetown/D.C.
Apr 7: Alexandria, IN, Farm Forum
Apr 7: Muncie, IN, Ball State University
Apr 7: Muncie, Luncheon /Press Conf
Apr 7: Muncie, Borg Warner /shift change
Apr 7: Lafayette, IN, Am Legion Reception
Apr 7: Lafayette, IN, Jeff-Jackson Dinner
Apr 8: South Bend, IN, Studebaker workers
Apr 8: Plymouth, IN, Marshall Co. Schools
Apr 8: Michawaka, IN, Bal Band plant
Apr 8: South Bend, IN, St. Mary’s College
Apr 8: South Bend, IN, Democratic Dinner
Apr 9: Flagstaff, AZ, Dem Breakfast
Apr 9: Tucson, AZ, ‘Nat Resource Devlpmnt’
Apr 9: Yuma, AZ, ‘High Interest Rates…’
Apr 9: Phoenix, AZ, ‘Natural Resources’
Apr 9: Phoenix, Democratic Reception
Apr 11: “Stop Kennedy” in WV reported
Apr 11: Parkersburg, WV, Elks Club Coffee
Apr 11: Charleston, Morris Harvey College
Apr 11: “ “, Kanawha Co. Court House
Apr 11: Charleston, Kanawha Hotel Lunch
Apr 11: Ona, WV, JFK/Post Office photo
Apr 11: Huntington, WV, Connors Steel
Apr 11: Huntington, Marshall College
Apr 11: Raleigh Co., WV, Airport Rally
Apr 11: Raleigh Co. Courthouse, Press
Apr 11: Beckley, WV, Slab Fork Coal Co.
Apr 11: Beckley, WV, ‘New Deal for WV’
Apr 12: N. Vincent Peale hits JFK religion
Apr 12: JFK Wins Illinois Primary
Apr 14: Palm Beach, FL, JFK R&R
Apr 17: Clarksburg, WV, with Jackie
Apr 18: Clarksburg, WBOY-TV
Apr 18: Clarksburg, Jackson Hotel Coffee
Apr 18: Clarksburg, Hazel Atlas plant
Apr 18: Clarksburg, ‘The Unemployed’
Apr 18: Fairmont, WV
Apr 18: Fairmont, ‘Program for Coal’
Apr 18: Fairmont, Lunch/Palace Restaurant
Apr 18: Fairmont, Owens-Illinois Glass
Apr 18: Morgantown, WV, Sterling Faucet
Apr 18: Pursglove, WV, Miners’ Mem. Cntr
Apr 18: Morgantown, Hotel Morgan Recep.
Apr 18: Morgantown, WV, ‘Coal By Wire…’
Apr 19: Bethany, WV, Bethany College
Apr 19: Bethany, W. Liberty St. College
Apr 19: Wheeling, WV, TV Interview
Apr 19: JFK & others, NBC-TV Startime
Apr 19: Wheeling, Sylvania Plant
Apr 19: Wheeling, Press Conference
Apr 19: Wheeling, WV, ‘WV & Pentagon’
Apr 19: Beckley, WV, Arival
Apr 20: Beckley, Beckley Manufacturing
Apr 20: Mt Hope, WV, ‘Food For WV’
Apr 20: Oak Hill, WV, Collins H.S.
Apr 20: Fayetteville, WV
Apr 20: Gauley Bridge, WV, High School
Apr 20: Montgomery, WV, High School
Apr 20: Cedar Grove, WV
Apr 20: Cabin Creek, WV, Jack’s Supmkt.
Apr 20: Charleston, Owens-Illinois plant
Apr 20: Charleston, ‘Program For WV’
Apr 20: Huntington, Depressed Area Aid
Apr 21: Wash., DC, Newspaper Editors
Apr 22: Portland, OR, Arrival/Press Conf
Apr 22: Portland, Omark Industries plant
Apr 22: N. Clackamas, OR, High School
Apr 22: N. Clackamas, Chamber of Com.
Apr 22: Milwaukie, OR, Milwaukie H.S.
Apr 22: Beaverton, OR, First Methodist
Apr 22: Beaverton, Pendleton Mills
Apr 22: S. Eugene, OR, ‘Disarmament’
Apr 23: Medford, OR, Pear Blossom Parade
Apr 23: Medford, Lunch, Hotel Medford
Apr 23: Portland, OR, ‘Social Security’
Apr 23: Ashland, OR
Apr 23: Portland, Cleveland High School
Apr 25: Huntington, WV, Press Conf
Apr 25: Huntington, TV Address
Apr 25: Huntington, Huntington Mfg. Co.
Apr 25: Lavalette, WV, Veterans Hospital
Apr 25: Lavalette, Wayne Co. Courthouse
Apr 25, Crum, WV, Railroad Workers
Apr 25: Kermit, WV
Apr 25: Williamson, WV, ‘Older Citizens’
Apr 25: Omar, WV
Apr 25: Rossmore, WV, Courthouse
Apr 25: Logan, WV, ‘Coal’
Apr 26: Welsh, WV
Apr 26: Amherstdale, WV, with FDR, Jr.
Apr 26: Amherstdale, Nat’l Fuels Policy
Apr 26: Pineville, WV, Court House Spch
Apr 26: Oceana, WV
Apr 26: Man, WV, Bluefield Nat’l Guard
Apr 26: Glenwood, WV
Apr 26: Mullens, WV, ‘Natural Resources…’
Apr 26: Near Mullens, Itmann coal mine
Apr 26: Welsh, Municipal Bldg. Spch
Apr 26: Kimball, WV
Apr 26: Keystone, WV
Apr 26: Northfork, WV
Apr 26: Maybeury, WV
Apr 26: Bramwell, WV
Apr 26: Glenwood Pk, WV, ‘Food For WV’
Apr 26: JFK Wins MA Primary
Apr 26: JFK Wins PA Primary
Apr 27: Athens, WV, ‘Teacher College Grads’
Apr 27: Bluefield, WV, Bluefield St. College
Apr 27: Bluefield, Jackie on WHIS-TV
Apr 27: Princeton, WV, Maidenform plant
Apr 27: Charles Town, WV, Dem. Rally
Apr 27: Kimball, WV
Apr 27: Near Eckman, Eureka Hollow
Apr 27: Bramwell, WV
Apr 27: Montcalm, WV
Apr 27: Goodwill Hollow, WV
Apr 27: Hinton, WV, (Ted Kennedy sub)
Apr 27: Alderson, WV, Alderson H.S.
Apr 27: Ronceverte, WV, High School
Apr 27: Lewisburg, WV, High School
Apr 27: White Sulfur Springs, WV
Apr 27: Martinsburg, WV, WEPM Radio
Apr 27: Charles Town, WV, Ractrack
Apr 28: Charleston, WV
Apr 28: Princeton, WV, Courthouse Spch
Apr 29: Albany, IN, U.S. Steel Plant
Apr 29: Seymour, IN, Freeman Field
Apr 29: Kokomo, Howard Co. Ct. Hse
Apr 29: Richmond, IN, Earlham College
Apr 29: Richmond, Holy Family School
Apr 29: Richmond, Jeff-Jackson Dinner
Apr 30: Esdale, WV, JFK sub/sore throat
Apr 30: Park, WV, Kroger’s Store
Apr 30: Kanawha City, WV
Apr 30: South Charleston, WV
Apr 30: Dunbar, WV
Apr 30: Madison, WV, Co. Courthouse
Apr 30: Marmet, WV, Ted Sorenson sub
Apr 30: Chesapeake, WV,
Apr 30: St. Albans, WV, Democratic Rally
Apr 30: Charleston, ‘Industry for WV’

 
May 1960

May 1: Parkersburg, WV, ‘WV Primary’
May 1: Weirton, WV, ‘Small Business’
May 3: Welch, WV, ‘Poverty in WV’
May 3: JFK Wins Indiana Primary
May 4: Charleston: JFK/HHH TV-Debate
May 4: Athens, WV, ‘Crisis in Education’
May 4: White Sulphur Springs, WV
May 4: Alderson, WV, ‘Indust. Devel.’
May 4: Ronceverte, WV, ‘Indust. Devel.’
May 4: Lewisburg, WV, ‘Youth Cons. Corps’
May 4: Charleston, ‘American Economy’
May 6: Huntington, WV, Economic Issues
May 7: Omaha, NE, ‘The Pres. Primary’
May 8: Elkins, WV, ‘Indust. Devel.’
May 8: Clarksburg, ‘Indust. Devel.’
May 8: Charleston, WV radio address
May 10: Wash, D.C., Dem Women’s Lunch
May 10: JFK Wins WV Primary
May 11: Chestertown, MD, Wash. College
May 12: Rockville, MD, Dem. Women
May 12: NY, NY, Bronx Dem. Dinner
May 13: Hagerstown, MD, ‘Indust. Devel.’
May 13: Frederick MD, Hood College Spch.
May 13: Baltimore, ‘American Economy’
May 14: Elkton, MD, ‘Ed. of Am. Politician’
May 14: Easton, MD, ‘Federal Farm Policy’
May 14: College Pk, Univ of MD Rally
May 14: Salisbury, MD, ‘Older Citizens’
May 14: Cambridge, MD, ‘Water Pollution’
May 14: MD, Alben Barkley Club Banquet
May 15: Portland, OR, Kennedy Rally
May 15: Portland, Riverside Little League
May 15: The Dalles, OR, ‘Oregon Primary’
May 16: Portland, Lewis & Clark College
May 16: Astoria, OR, Democratic Lunch
May 17: Portland, Hillsboro High School
May 17: Eugene, OR, Weyerhaeuser Co.
May 17: JFK Wins MD Primary
May 18: St. Helens, OR, Breakfast Spch.
May 18: Portland, OR, Benson H.S. Rally
May 20: JFK Wins Oregon Primary
May 27: Spokane, WA, ‘Democratic Party’
May 29: Libertyville, IL, w/Adlai Stevenson
May 31: L.A., CA, Dinner for Gov. Brown
May 31: L.A., CA, Democratic Dinner
May 31: Scripps-Howard papers for LBJ

 
June 1960

Jun 1: San Francisco, Gov. Brown Dinner
Jun 2: Chicago, IL, Textile Workers Union
Jun 2: Chicago, JFK: “National Decline”
Jun 3: Mackinac Island, MI
Jun 4: JFK/LBJ Split NM Dem Delegates
Jun 4: Minneapolis, MN, Jeff-Jack Dinner
Jun 7: Grand Rapids, MI, AFL-CIO Convnt.
Jun 7: Gov. Pat Brown Wins CA Primary
Jun 7: Sen. Humphrey, Wins SD Primary
Jun 10: E. Roosevelt Endorses Stevenson
Jun 11: St. Louis Post for Stevenson
Jun 16: JFK on TV’s Jack Paar Show
Jun 17: NY, NY, Nat’l Dem. Luncheon
Jun 18: Aberdeen, SD, ‘Ag Bill of Rights’
Jun 18: Durango, CO, Nat. Resource Cons.
Jun 19: Sioux Falls, SD, Am. Legion Convnt.
Jun 19: Fargo, ND, Fargo Airport Spch
Jun 19: Fargo, ND, Fairgrounds
Jun 19: Fargo, ND, Quentin Burdick Dinner
Jun 22: Dover, DE, Dover Air Force Base
Jun 22: Dover, DE, Dover Hotel
Jun 22: Camden, NJ, John Healey Dinner
Jun 22: Spring Lake., NJ, Dem Dinner
Jun 22: Camden, 1st Cong. Dist. Dinner
Jun 22: Speech before NY Liberal Party
Jun 22: Pittsburgh Press interview
Jun 23: NY, NY, Mtg. w/Martin L. King
Jun 24: Wash., African Diplomatic Corps
Jun 25: Hyannis, MA
Jun 26: Iowa Campaigning, ‘Farm Policy’
Jun 27: Helena, MT
Jun 27: Helena, Montana Legislature.
Jun 27: Helena, Marlow Theater
Jun 27: Helena, Dem State Convention
Jun 27: Helena, Placer Hotel/Dem Mtg
Jun 29: JFK: Mtg w Jackie Robinson.
Jun 30: NYPost: Stevenson-JFK ticket.

 
July 1960

Jul 1: A. Clayton Powell for Symington
Jul 1: JFK Meets w/ Sen. Symington
Jul 1: JFK Reply to Jackie Robinson
Jul 2: Harry Truman: “JFK Too Young”
Jul 4: CBS TV: JFK Rebuts Truman
Jul 4: JFK’s Health Raised
Jul 4: Newsweek: Who Can Stop JFK?
Jul 5: LBJ Announces Candidacy
Jul 6: JFK to Harlem, NY/J.R. Jones
Jul 8: NY, JFK Predicts DNC Win

 
Democratic National Convention
Los Angeles, California

Jul 9: JFK Arrives at DNC
Jul 10: JFK: Meet the Press
Jul 10: JFK Speech at NAACP
Jul 10: Illinois – 59 ½ votes to JFK
Jul 10: Gov. Brown Endorses JFK
Jul 10: E. Roosevelt Arrives at DNC
Jul 10: Dem Nat’l Committee Dinner
Jul 10: Celebrity Gala: Sinatra, et. al.,
Jul 11: DNC Formally Opens
Jul 11: Sammy Davis Booed at DNC
Jul 11: Gov. Lawrence: PA For JFK
Jul 12: JFK/LBJ Showdown Debate
Jul 12: Stevenson Floor Demonstration
Jul 13: JFK Nominated/1st Ballot
Jul 14: JFK Picks LBJ For V.P. Slot
Jul 15: JFK Formally Nominated
Jul 16: L.A. Coliseum: ‘New Frontier’
Jul 16: L.A., JFK Press Conference
Jul 16: Dem Nat’l Convention Close
Jul 16: Private Dinner, Romanoff’s
Jul 17: Depart for Boston/Hyannis, MA

 
Jul-Aug 1960 – Post DNC
Hyannis, Massachusetts

Jul 19: Hyannis, Campaign Planning
Jul 19: Look, ‘Kennedys: Pol Machine’
Jul 20: Hyannis, 3 Top Aides Named
Jul 23: Hyannis: Allen Dulles Briefs JFK
Jul 25-28:Republican Nat’l Convention
Jul 26: JFK Praise for Gov. Rockefeller
Jul 28: JFK Accepts TV Debate Prop.
Jul 28: Hyannis: JFK Press Conference
Jul 29: Hyannis: JFK/Stevenson Confer
Jul 29: Hyannis: JFK/LBJ Confer
Jul 29: JFK Accepts 2 More TV Debates
Jul 30: JFK-LBJ Joint Press Conference
Aug 1: Hyannis: Dems on Farm Policy
Aug 2: Hyannis: Civil Rights & Campaign
Aug 4: Gov Meyner Heads NJ Campaign
Aug 5: NY, NY, Overseas Press Club
Aug 6: Hyannis, MA, Lithuanian Leaders
Aug 6: Hyannis, Policy-American Leaders
Aug 6: Hyannis, Chinese-Americans
Aug 6: Hyannis, Immigration Statement

 
August 1960

Aug 8: U.S. Senate Reconvenes
Aug 8: Wash., DC, ‘Civil Rights’
Aug 9: Wash., ‘Republicans & Civil Rights’
Aug 10: Truman to Campaign for JFK-LBJ
Aug 10: U.S. Senate, ‘Minimum Wage Bill’
Aug 11: 3 Rail Unions Back JFK-LBJ
Aug 13: Wash., ‘Medical Care of Aged’
Aug 14: Hyde Park, NY w/ E. Roosevelt
Aug 14: Hyde Pk, FDR Home/S.S.Act 25th
Aug 17: Nat’l Assn. County Officials (tel)
Aug 17: U.S. Senate, ‘Airlift Africa’
Aug 18: Wash., ‘Minimum Wage Bill’
Aug 19: ‘Farmers for Kennedy & Johnson’
Aug 20: Omaha, NE, Offutt Air Force Base
Aug 20: Independence, Missouri
Aug 20: Missouri Mtg. w/Harry Truman
Aug 20: Independence, MO, Press Conf.
Aug 20-21: Des Moines, IA, Farm Conf.
Aug 21: Des Moines, LBJ & JFK
Aug 21: Des Moines, LBJ & JFK Press
Aug 21: Des Moines, JFK Farm Spch
Aug 21: “Farmers for JFK-LBJ” Press
Aug 22: Life Magazine Article by JFK
Aug 24: Alexandria, VA, Dem. Rally
Aug 26: NY, NY, Zionists of America
Aug 26: Detroit, MI, VFW Convention
Aug 26: Miami, AMVET Cnvnt. (tel)
Aug 26: AFL-CIO Endorses Kennedy
Aug 30: NY State AFL-CIO (tel)
Aug 30: Wash., DC, Press Conf.
Aug 31: Nat’l Bar Assn., ‘Negro Judges’

 
September 1960

Sept 2: Portland, ME, Press Conference
Sept 2: Manchester, NH, Airport Rally
Sept 2: Presque Isle, ME, Airport Rally
Sept 2: Bangor, ME, ‘1960 Election’
Sept 2: Portland, ME, ‘1960 Election’
Sept 3: San Francisco, A-port / Press
Sept 3: Anchorage, AK, A-port / Press
Sept 3: Palmer, Alaska, State Fair
Sept 3: Anchorage, TV/Radio Spot
Sept 4: Detroit, MI, Airport Reception.
Sept 5: Detroit, Labor Day kick-off
Sept 5: Detroit, State Fair/Labor
Sept 5: Pontiac, MI, Labor Day picnic
Sept 5: Flint, MI, Atwood Stadium
Sept 5: Muskegon, MI, Lab. Day Picnic
Sept 5: Muskegon, Doo Drop Inn
Sept 6: Alaska Newspapers by Phone
Sept 6: Pocatello, Idaho, Press Interview
Sept 6: Pocatello, ‘Mining Legislation’
Sept 6: Pocatello, Radio Interview
Sept 6: Spokane, WA, Parade & Speech
Sept 6: Seattle, WA, Public Rally
Sept 6: Seattle, ‘National Defense’
Sept 7: Seattle, WA, Press Conference
Sept 7: Eugene, OR, Public Rally
Sept 7: Eugene, ‘American Prestige’
Sept 7: Salem, OR, Public Rally
Sept 7: Portland, OR, TV Appearance
Sept 7: Portland, Multnomah Hotel
Sept 7: N. V. Peale: Catholic President

 
California Whistlestop Tour
September 8-9, 1960

Sept 8: Redding, CA
Sept 8: Red Bluff, CA
Sept 8: Chico, CA
Sept 8: Marysville, CA
Sept 8: Sacramento, CA
Sept 8: Davis, CA
Sept 8: Fairfield, CA
Sept 8: Martinez, CA
Sept 8: Richmond, CA
Sept 8: Oakland, CA,
Sept 9: Stockton, CA
Sept 9: Modesto, CA
Sept 9: Turlock, CA
Sept 9: Merced, CA
Sept 9: Madera, CA
Sept 9: Fresno, CA
Sept 9: Tulare, CA
Sept 9: Bakersfield, CA

 
September 1960 (cont’d)

Sept 9: Burbank, CA, A-port Press
Sept 9: Burbank, Shopping Centery
Sept 9: L.A., Shrine Aud/‘Civil Rights’
Sept 11: San Diego, Linbergh Field
Sept 11: San Diego, Grant Hotel
Sept 11: San Diego, ‘Defense’
Sept 11: El Paso, TX, Arrival
Sept 12: El Paso, ‘Democratic Party’
Sept 12: Lubbock, TX, Airport speech
Sept 12: San Antonio, TX, Motorcade
Sept 12: San Antonio, Alamo Speech
Sept 12: Houston, Coliseum Speech
Sept 12: Houston Ministers Speech
Sept 12: Austin, TX, Arrival
Sept 13: Austin, Spch on Capitol Steps
Sept 13: Ft. Worth, TX, Arrival
Sept 13: Arlington, TX, Motorcade
Sept 13: Dallas, Memorial Aud. Speech
Sept 13: Dallas, Chance Vought Aircraft
Sept 13: Texarkana, TX, Courthouse Square
Sept 13: NY Liberal Party for JFK
Sept 14: St. Louis, I. A.M. Convention
Sept 14: NYC, Dem. Women’s Luncheon
Sept 14: NYC, Fundraising
Sept 14: NYC, Kennedy Workers Rally
Sept 14: NYC, Senior Citizens Rally
Sept 14: NYC, Liberal Party Nomination
Sept 15: Jersey City, NJ, Dem Party Spch
Sept 15: Bergen, NJ, Bergen Mall Rally
Sept 15: Paterson, NJ, City Hall Rally
Sept 15: Newark, NJ, City Hall Rally
Sept 15: Elizabeth, NJ, City Hall Rally
Sept 15: N. Brunswick, Hall of Records
Sept 15: Trenton, NJ, State Office Bldg.
Sept 15: Clifton, NJ, Dem Party Speech
Sept 15: Mercer, PA, Arrival
Sept 15: Harrisburg, PA, Band Greeting
Sept 15: Harrisburg, PA, Market Sq. Spch
Sept 15: Harrisburg, Zembo Mosque
Sept 15: Harrisburg, PA, Statewide TV
Sept 16: Lebanon, PA, ‘Republican Party’
Sept 16: Reading, PA, ‘Republican Party’
Sept 16: Lancaster, PA, Penn Square Spch
Sept 16: Columbia, PA, ‘Republican Party’
Sept 16: York, PA, Lincoln Woods Inn
Sept 16: York, PA, Fairgrounds Speech
Sept 16: Towson, MD, ‘Democratic Party’
Sept 16: Pikesville, MD, ‘Khrushchev Visit’
Sept 16: Washington, DC, Arrival/Home
Sept 17: Greenville, NC, Tobacco Auction
Sept 17: Greenville, E. Carolina Stadium
Sept 17: Greensboro, NC, Airport speech
Sept 17: Ashville, NC, via Phone Conf.
Sept 17: Charlotte, NC, Coliseum Speech
Sept 17: Raleigh, NC, Gov’s Mansion
Sept 17: Raleigh, Rally, Speech, Q&A
Sept 17: Washington, DC, Arrival/Home
Sept 18: Americans for Dem Action for JFK
Sept 19: Atlantic City, NJ, Chem Workers
Sept 19: Atlantic City, NJ, Steelworkers
Sept 19: Charleston, WV, Dan Boone House
Sept 19: Charleston, TV talk & Press Conf
Sept 19: CBS-TV: Cronkite/JFK Interview
Sept 19: CIA’s Allen Dulles Briefs JFK
Sept 19: Washington, DC, Arrival/Home
Sept 20: Wash., DC, Sheraton Hotel Spch
Sept 20: Person to Person TV w/Jackie
Sept 21: Tri Cities Airport, VA/TN, Rally
Sept 21: Knoxville, TN, Airport Rally
Sept 21: Nashville, TN, War Memorial Spch.
Sept 21: Nashville, State Fair, ‘Farm Policy’
Sept 21: Memphis, TN, TV Speech
Sept 21: Memphis, Riverside Drive Rally
Sept 21: Sioux City, IA, Municipal Aud. Spch
Sept 22: Sioux City, Fundraising Breakfast
Sept 22: Fort Dodge, IA, Parade
Sept 22: Fort Dodge, IA, Airport Speech
Sept 22: Sioux Falls, SD, Airport Speech
Sept 22: Sioux Falls, Nat’l Plowing Contest
Sept 22: Mitchell, SD, ‘Federal Farm Policy’
Sept 22: Fargo, ND, Airport Rally/Reception
Sept 22: Billings, MT, Shrine Auditorium
Sept 22: Cheyenne, WY, ‘Nat. Resources’
Sept 23: Cheyenne, Brkfst Spch, Frontier Pk
Sept 23: Cheyenne, Airport Rally
Sept 23: Denver, CO, Civic Center Rally
Sept 23: Denver, CO, Hilton Hotel Spch.
Sept 23: Salt Lake City, Mormon Tabernacle
Sept 23: Salt Lake City, Tabernacle TV Show
Sept 23: Salt Lake City, Hotel Utah Spch
Sept 24: Chicago, Arrival-1st TV debate
Sept 25: Cleveland, OH, Hotel Hollenden
Sept 26: Cleveland, Euclid Beach Pk.
Sept 26: Chicago, IL, Carpenters Union.
Sept 26: 1st Kennedy-Nixon TV Debate
Sept 27: Painesville, OH, ‘Dem. Party’
Sept 27: Lorain, OH, Stadium Rally
Sept 27: Mansfield, OH, ‘Foreign Policy’
Sept 27: Akron, OH, Armory Spch & Rally
Sept 27: Canton, OH, Municipal Aud.
Sept 27: Erie, PA, Airport Rally
Sept 28: Erie, Breakfast Speech
Sept 28: Erie, Lawrence Hotel Rally
Sept 28: Niagra Falls, Bell Aircraft Co.
Sept 28: Niagra Falls, Treadway Inn Spch.
Sept 28: Lockport, NY, ‘Pres. Election’
Sept 29: N. Tonawanda, ‘Pres. Election’
Sept 28: Rochester, NY, Business Leaders
Sept 28: Rochester, War Memorial Rally
Sept 28: Buffalo, NY, Senior Citizens Mtg
Sept 28: Buffalo, Memorial Aud. Speech
Sept 29: Albany, NY, State Capitol Rally
Sept 29: Troy, NY, Rally, ‘Pres. Election’
Sept 29: Schenectady, NY, Rally
Sept 29: Amsterdam, NY, ‘Am. Economy’
Sept 29: Little Falls, NY, Lunch Rally
Sept 29: Ilion, NY
Sept 29: Utica, NY, Rally
Sept 29: Rome, NY, Rally
Sept 29: Oneida, NY, Rally
Sept 29: Syracuse, NY, ‘Foreign Policy’
Sept 29: Syracuse, NY, TV Address
Sept 29: Charles Collingwood, CBS-TV
Sept 30: Hyannis, Huntley-Brinkley/NBC

 
October 1960

Oct 1: Chicago, City Hall, ‘Eastern Europe’
Oct 1: Chicago, American Polish Congress
Oct 1: Chicago, Lake Meadow Shop. Cntr
Oct 1: Minneapolis, MN, TV Address
Oct 1: Minneapolis, Bean Feed
Oct 1: Minneapolis, Fundraising Spch
Oct 2: St. Paul, MN, Airport Rally
Oct 2: St. Paul, St. Paul Hotel Spch
Oct 2: St. Paul, GTA Convention
Oct 2: Duluth, MN, Univ of MN
Oct 2: Hibbing, MN, Mem. Arena Spch.
Oct 2: St. Louis, Arrival, Chase Hotel
Oct 3: Alton, IL, ‘Democratic Party’
Oct 3: Granite City, IL, ‘Pres. Election’
Oct 3: E. St. Louis, 15th & Broadway
Oct 3: E. St. Louis, National Stockyards
Oct 3: Belleville, IL, Augustine’s
Oct 3: Belleville, ‘1960 Pres. Election’
Oct 3: Carbondale, IL, Stadium Speech
Oct 3: Marion, IL, Court House
Oct 3: Marion, Veterans’s Hospital
Oct 3: Marion Airport, ‘Dem Party’
Oct 3: Harrisburg, IL, ‘Farm Policy’
Oct 3: Venice, IL, ‘Republican Party’
Oct 3: Springfield, IL, Armory Spch.
Oct 3: Chicago. IL
Oct 4: Evansville, IN, Courthouse Rally
Oct 4: Indianapolis, IN, WTTV-TV
Oct 4: Indianapolis, Auditorium Spch
Oct 5: Pendleton, IN, ‘Am. Economy’
Oct 5: Anderson, IN, Courthouse Rally
Oct 5: Muncie, IN, Courthouse Rally
Oct 5: Muncie, Muncie Gear Works
Oct 5: Terre Haute, IN, Courthouse Rally
Oct 5: Louisville, KY, Jefferson Square
Oct 5: Louisville, Fairgrounds
Oct 5: Louisville, KY, TV Address
Oct 6: Cincinnati, OH, Gov’t Square
Oct 6: Cincinnati, Democratic Dinner
Oct 6: Washington, DC, Arrival Home
Oct 7: DC, Howard Univ, ‘Civil Rights’
Oct 7: Kennedy-Nixon, 2nd TV Debate
Oct 8: Lexington, KY, University of KY
Oct 8: Bowling Green, KY, Courthouse
Oct 8: Paducah, KY, Rally
Oct 8: Washington, DC, Arrival Home
Oct 9: Youngstown, OH, Rally
Oct 9: Girard, OH, ‘Democratic Party’
Oct 9: Warren, OH, Courthouse Rally
Oct 9: Salem, OH, Rally
Oct 9: Louisville, KY, ‘Democratic Party’
Oct 10: Columbus, GA, Airport Rally
Oct 10: Warm Springs, Little White Hse
Oct 10: La Grange, GA, Airport
Oct 10: Columbia, SC, State House Spch
Oct 10: Pittsburgh, PA, Gateway Center
Oct 10: Pittsburgh, Urban Affairs Conf.
Oct 10: Pittsburgh, Syria Mosque
Oct 10: NYC, Late night arrival
Oct 12: NYC, Breakfast w/Mrs Roosevelt
Oct 12: NYC, Columbus Day Parade
Oct 12: NYC, Associated Biz Pubs Conf.
Oct 12: NYC, Democratic Committees
Oct 12: NYC, Constitutional Rights Conf.
Oct 12: Mineola, NY, Long Island Fair
Oct 12: NYC, Hotel Theresa Rally
Oct 12: E. Harlem, Puerto Rican Rally
Oct 12: NYC, Nat’l Council of Women
Oct 13: Kennedy-Nixon, 3rd TV Debate
Oct 13: Los Angeles Times for Nixon
Oct 14: Ann Arbor, U. of Mich /early a.m.
Oct 14: Whistle stop /Southern Mich??
Oct 14: Jackson, MI, ‘Democratic Party’
Oct 14: Albion, MI, Republican critique
Oct 14: Marshall, MI, ‘Democratic Party’
Oct 14: Battle Creek, MI
Oct 14: Kalamazoo, MI, ‘Foreign Policy’
Oct 14: Grand Rapids, MI, Rally
Oct 14: E. Lansing, Mich. State University
Oct 14: Owasso, MI, ‘American Economy’
Oct 14: Lansing, MI, Capitol Steps Spch.
Oct 14: Bay County, MI
Oct 14: Saginaw, MI, ‘Democratic Party’
Oct 14: Denver, CO, Adult Ed Assoc.
Oct 15: Sharon, PA, Rally
Oct 15: New Castle, PA, Rally
Oct 15: Beaver Falls, PA, Rally
Oct 15: Butler, PA, ‘American Economy’
Oct 15: Kittanning, PA, Rally
Oct 15: Indiana, PA, Rally
Oct 15: Johnstown, PA, Rally
Oct 15: Washington, DC, Arrive Home
Oct 16: Levittown, NJ, Shopping Cntr Rally
Oct 16: Wilmington, DE, Airport Rally
Oct 16: Wash., DC, Meet The Press TV
Oct 16: Silver Spring, MD, Blair H.S.
Oct 17: Dayton, OH, Courthouse Rally
Oct 17: Dayton, Biltmore Hotel Speech
Oct 17: Fairborn, OH, Rally
Oct 17: Springfield, OH, Wittenberg College
Oct 17: London, OH, ‘Democratic Party’
Oct 17: Columbus, OH, Statehouse Rally
Oct 18: N. Miami Bch, FL, 163rd St. Rally
Oct 18: Miami, Am. Legion Convention/TV
Oct 18: Tampa, FL, Latin America speech
Oct 18: Jacksonville, FL. Hemming Park
Oct 18: Esquire’s N. Mailer JFK Story
Oct 19: NY City Hall steps, JFK speech
Oct 19: Motorcade through NY City
Oct 19: NYC: Rockefeller Plaza Rally
Oct 19: NYC: Union Hall Speech
Oct 19: Yonkers, NY, ‘Democratic Party’
Oct 19: NYC, Alfred E. Smith Dinner
Oct 20: Brooklyn, Fulton & Duffield Sts.
Oct 20: Brooklyn, Fulton & Nostrand Sts.
Oct 20: Brooklyn, Foster & Nostrand Sts.
Oct 20: Brooklyn, NY, Sears Roebuck
Oct 20: Brooklyn, Utica & Eastern
Oct 20: Brooklyn, Macy’s Dept Store
Oct 20: NYC, Pat Clancy Dinner, Astor
Oct 20: NYC: Madison Sq. Garden Spch
Oct 21: Kennedy-Nixon, 4th TV Debate
Oct 22: St. Louis, MO, Democratic Brkfst
Oct 22: Crestwood, MO, ‘1960 Election’
Oct 22: St. Louis, Northland Shop Cntr
Oct 22: Jennings, MO, ‘Dem. Party’
Oct 22: Joplin, MO, Airport Rally
Oct 22: Wichita, KS, Lawrence Stadium
Oct 22: K.C., MO, Richards-Gebaur AFB
Oct 22: Grandview, MO, Truman Shop Cntr
Oct 22: Kansas City, MO, Televised Spch
Oct 22: Kansas City, KS, Shawnee H.S.
Oct 22: Prairie Vlg., KS, Johnson Co. Dems
Oct 22: Green Bay, WI, Arrival, p.m.
Oct 23: Green Bay, Brown County Arena
Oct 23: La Crosse, WI, Airport Rally
Oct 23: Madison, WI, Field House Rally
Oct 23: Milwaukee, WI, Parade
Oct 23: Milwaukee, Arena Speech, TV
Oct 24: Champaign, IL, Willard Airport
Oct 24: Champaign-Urbana, Univ. of IL
Oct 24: Moline, IL, New Field House
Oct 24: Peoria, IL, Downtown Rally
Oct 24: Peoria, Live TV Program
Oct 24: E. Peoria, Caterpillar Plant
Oct 24: Rock Island, IL, ‘Nixon’s Record’
Oct 24: Rockford, IL, Coronado Theater
Oct 25: Chicago, O’Hare Inn
Oct 25: Libertyville, IL
Oct 25: Lake Zurich, IL
Oct 25: Barrington, IL, Barrington School
Oct 25: Carpentersville, IL,
Oct 25: Dundee, IL, Shopping Cntr Rally
Oct 25: Elgin, IL, Parade & Rally
Oct 25: Elgin, IL, Rally, Elgin Watch Co.
Oct 25: St. Charles, IL, Baker Park
Oct 25: Geneva, IL, Geneva Courthouse
Oct 25: Batavia, IL, ‘1960 Election’
Oct 25: Mooseheart, IL, Boys’ Home
Oct 25: Northgate, IL, Shopping Center
Oct 25: Aurora, IL, City Hall Rally
Oct 25: Elmhurst, IL, ‘Prestige Abroad’
Oct 25: Plainfield, IL
Oct 25: Hillcrest, IL, Shopping Center
Oct 25: Joliet, IL, Rally
Oct 25: York Township, IL, High School
Oct 26: Selfridge AFB, Michigan
Oct 26: Mt. Clemens, MI, Speech
Oct 26: Warren, MI, Republican. Critique
Oct 26: Rosedale, MI, ‘Education’
Oct 26: Hamtramck, MI
Oct 26: Macomb Co., MI. Shopping Cntr
Oct 26: Detroit, MI, Dem Party Workers
Oct 26: Detroit, Michigan State Fair
Oct 26: Detroit, Keyworth Stadium Speech
Oct 26: Detroit, Coliseum Speech (TV)
Oct 26: Newark, NJ, Governor’s Ball
Oct 26: Phone call to Coretta Scott King
Oct 27: NYC, ILGWU Speech (TV)
Oct 27: NYC, Liberal Party Rally
Oct 27: NYC, Stuyvesant Town Rally
Oct 27: NYC, Union Sq / Workers Rally
Oct 27: NYC, New York University
Oct 27: Brooklyn, NY, Motorcade
Oct 27: Brooklyn, Eastern Pkwy Arena
Oct 27: Queens, Sunnyside Gardens
Oct 27: Staten Island, NY
Oct 27: Bethlehem, PA, Arrival, p.m.
Oct 28: Bethlehem, Democratic Breakfast
Oct 28: Bethlehem, Moravian College
Oct 28: Allentown, PA, Center Sq Rally
Oct 28: Pottsville, PA, Rally
Oct 28: Hazleton, PA, Rally
Oct 28: Wilkes-Barre, PA, Rally
Oct 28: Scranton, PA, ‘Am. Economy’
Oct 28: Phila., PA, Aronomink CClub
Oct 29: Phila., PA, Lawrence Park
Oct 29: Chester, PA, Rally
Oct 29: Upper Darby, PA, Rally
Oct 29: Montgomery, PA, Lord & Taylor
Oct 29: Roosevelt Field, PA, Rally
Oct 29: Willow Grove, PA Snellenburg’s
Oct 29: Cheltenham, PA, Shopping Cntr
Oct 29: Philadelphia, PA, WFIL-TV
Oct 29: Valley Forge, PA, Rally
Oct 29: Valley Forge, Fundraising Din.
Oct 29: JFK cover, Saturday Eve. Post
Oct 30: Chicago Tribune endorses Nixon
Oct 30: Levittown, PA, Shopping Cntr
Oct 30: Phila., PA, Face The Nation TV
Oct 31: Phila., 6 Citizen Groups
Oct 31: Phila., Penn Fruit Shop Cntr
Oct 31: Phila., Bonds for Israel Dinner
Oct 31: Phila., Raymond Rosen Apts.
Oct 31: Phila., Rayburn Plaza Rally
Oct 31: Phila., TV studio
Oct 31: Phila., Temple University
Oct 31: Phila., Fundraising Dinner

 
November 1960

Nov 1: Los Angeles, Univ of So Cal
Nov 1: L.A., Elks Auditorium
Nov 1: L.A., Negro Ministers Mtg
Nov 1: L.A., Garment Workers Rally
Nov 1: Long Beach, Douglas Aircraft
Nov 1: Redondo Bch, South Bay Cntr
Nov 1: East L.A. State College Rally
Nov 2: L. A., Dem Women Breakfast
Nov 2: San Diego, City Plaza Rally
Nov 2: San Diego, Linbergh Field
Nov 2: San Jose, Downtown Rally
Nov 2: Oakland, Defremery Park
Nov 2: San Francisco, Fundraising
Nov 2: San Francisco, Cow Palace/TV
Nov 2: Henry Fonda w/Jackie K./ TV
Nov 3: Phoenix, AZ, Arrival, a.m.
Nov 3: Phoenix, Party Workers Brkfst
Nov 3: Phoenix, Rally/Spch/Telecast
Nov 3: Albuquerque, NM, Airport
Nov 3: Albuquerque, Univ. Rally
Nov 3: Amarillo, TX, w/LBJ
Nov 3: Wichita Falls, Airport Rally
Nov 3: Oklahoma City, Rally /TV
Nov 3: Okla. City, Reding Shop Cntr
Nov 4: Wash., DC, Arrive, early a.m.
Nov 4: Roanoke, VA, Airport Rally
Nov 4: Norfolk, VA, Campaign Rally
Nov 4: Toledo, OH, Courthouse Rally
Nov 4: Chicago, Buffet w Mayor Daley
Nov 4: Chicago /Torchlight /1.5 million
Nov 4: Chicago Stadium / NBC-TV
Nov 5: NYC, Fundraising Breakfast
Nov 5: NYC, Bronx, Grand Concourse
Nov 5: NYC, Bronx Women/Lunch
Nov 5: NYC, Queens Women/Lunch
Nov 5: NYC, Queens, Blvd Restaurant
Nov 5: NYC, Columbus Circle Spch
Nov 5: Nassau Co, NY, Sunrise Ave.
Nov 5: Flushing, NY, Elchester Apts.
Nov 5: NYC, 90th Street Rally
Nov 5: NYC, State Dems Meeting
Nov 5: NYC, Coliseum (outside)
Nov 5: NY Coliseum, ‘Presidency’
Nov 5: Waterbury, CT, Arrival, p.m.
Nov 6: Waterbury, Street Rally
Nov 6: New Haven, CT. Street Rally
Nov 6: Bridgeport, Railroad Plaza
Nov 6: Lake Ronkonkoma, CT
Nov 6: Newark, NJ, Mosque Theater
Nov 6: Teterboro, Teaneck Armory
Nov 6: Jersey City, NJ, Journal Sq.
Nov 6: Lewiston, Maine
Nov 6: Nixon TV Program
Nov 6: NYC, JFK TV Program
Nov 6: Gallup: 49% JFK, 48% Nixon
Nov 7: Roper: 49% Nixon, 47% JFK
Nov 7: Time cvr, ‘Candidate Kennedy’
Nov 7: Providence, RI, Airport
Nov 7: Providence, City Hall
Nov 7: Springfield, MA, city Hall
Nov 7: Hartford, CT, ‘Am. Economy’
Nov 7: Burlington, VT
Nov 7: Manchester, NH, Park Rally
Nov 7: Nixon Celeb TV Telethon
Nov 7: Manchester, JFK TV Program
Nov 7: T. Dewey on TV, Rebuts JFK
Nov 7: Boston, MA, Boston Garden
Nov 7: Boston, Nat’l TV Address
Nov 8: Election Day
Nov 9: JFK Elected President
Nov 9: Hyannis, Press Conference
Nov 9: Boston, ‘City Upon a Hill’

 
Post Election, Cabinet, etc.

Nov 10: Palm Beach, FL, R&R
Nov 12: L. Hodges: Commerce Sec
Nov 14: JFK & Nixon Meet/FL
Nov 16: Absentee Ballot Count
Nov 16: Nixon Wins California
Nov 18: A. Dulles Briefs JFK
Nov 21: Life cover, ‘Kennedys’
Nov 25: John F. Kennedy, Jr Born
Dec 1: Sen Ribbicoff: HEW Sec.
Dec 7: Rep Udall: Interior Sec.
Dec 12: Dean Rusk: Sec of State
Dec 13: R. McNamara, Defense Sec.
Dec 15: Final Election Vote Count
Dec 15: O. Freeman: Sec of Ag
Dec 15: A. Goldberg: Labor Sec.
Dec 16: RFK: Attorney General
Dec 16: D. Dillon, Treasury Sec.
Dec 17: J.E. Day, Postmaster Gen.
Dec 19: Electoral College Vote
Dec 19: Life: JFK, Jr Christening
Dec 25: Kennedys to Palm Beach

 
January 1961

Jan 2: JFK to Orange Bowl
Jan 19: Wash., DC, Snow
Jan 19: Pre-Inaugural Gala
Jan 20: JFK Inauguration
Jan 20: JFK: “Ask Not…”
Jan 20: 80 Million TV Viewers
Jan 21: JFK Meets w/Cabinet

____________________________
 
 
Note: This listing provides a rough overview of JFK’s 1960 travel itinerary, speeches, and other activities at the listed locations. Some dates and events are “best approximations” given uncertain and/or conflicting sourcing information. Sources for many of these campaign stops are listed below along with additional photos. More detailed information on JFK’s activities at many of these locations is available at the JFK Presidential Library in Boston.

 

____________________________

Date Posted: 19 July 2014
Last Update: 17 September 2014
Comments to: jdoyle@pophistorydig.com

Article Citation:
Jack Doyle, “JFK’s 1960 Campaign: Primaries
& General Election,” PopHistoryDig.com,
July 19, 2014.

_______________________________

 


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Sources, Links & Additional Information

A Norman Rockwell portrait of JFK appeared on the cover of the ‘Saturday Evening Post’ of Oct 29, 1960 – the Post then being one of the nation’s largest circulation magazines, and Rockwell, one of America’s most famous illustrators and portrait artists. He also did Nixon's.
A Norman Rockwell portrait of JFK appeared on the cover of the ‘Saturday Evening Post’ of Oct 29, 1960 – the Post then being one of the nation’s largest circulation magazines, and Rockwell, one of America’s most famous illustrators and portrait artists. He also did Nixon's.
JFK greeting Ohio Democratic Gov. Mike DiSalle, who after some Kennedy-team pressure, announced in Jan-uary 1960 that Ohio’s delegates would be JFK’s at DNC.
JFK greeting Ohio Democratic Gov. Mike DiSalle, who after some Kennedy-team pressure, announced in Jan-uary 1960 that Ohio’s delegates would be JFK’s at DNC.
Jan 3, 1960: JFK on ‘Meet the Press’ TV show a day after he announced his candidacy. At left is Ned Brooks, the show’s moderator. AP photo.
Jan 3, 1960: JFK on ‘Meet the Press’ TV show a day after he announced his candidacy. At left is Ned Brooks, the show’s moderator. AP photo.
Jan 21, 1960: JFK at a press conference in Milwaukee, WI, where he announced he would run in the state’s April 5th, 1960 primary against Sen. Hubert Humphrey. Kennedy aide, Pierre Salinger, is seen in the back-ground, far right, reading from paper.  Photo, UPI.
Jan 21, 1960: JFK at a press conference in Milwaukee, WI, where he announced he would run in the state’s April 5th, 1960 primary against Sen. Hubert Humphrey. Kennedy aide, Pierre Salinger, is seen in the back-ground, far right, reading from paper. Photo, UPI.
January 24, 1960: JFK & Jackie, campaigning in Nashua, N.H., sit at local lunch counter and chat with townsfolk.
January 24, 1960: JFK & Jackie, campaigning in Nashua, N.H., sit at local lunch counter and chat with townsfolk.
March 28, 1960:  A key early test for JFK came in the Wisconsin primary of April 5th, 1960, as Newsweek asked: “Who’ll Tumble?”– Humphrey or Kennedy?”
March 28, 1960: A key early test for JFK came in the Wisconsin primary of April 5th, 1960, as Newsweek asked: “Who’ll Tumble?”– Humphrey or Kennedy?”
JFK addressing a breakfast or luncheon gathering in Wisconsin prior to that state’s April 5th, 1960 primary.
JFK addressing a breakfast or luncheon gathering in Wisconsin prior to that state’s April 5th, 1960 primary.
April 5th, 1960: Sen. Hubert Humphrey and JFK enjoy a moment of friendly banter during tabulation of the West Virginia primary election returns, which JFK would win.
April 5th, 1960: Sen. Hubert Humphrey and JFK enjoy a moment of friendly banter during tabulation of the West Virginia primary election returns, which JFK would win.
April 25, 1960: JFK campaigns in rural Logan County, West Virginia looking for support for the May 10th primary, precariously perched on a high-chair to deliver his speech. Photo, Hank Walker.
April 25, 1960: JFK campaigns in rural Logan County, West Virginia looking for support for the May 10th primary, precariously perched on a high-chair to deliver his speech. Photo, Hank Walker.
April 1960: JFK shakes hands with a one-arm coal miner while campaigning in Mullens, WV. Photo/Hank Walker.
April 1960: JFK shakes hands with a one-arm coal miner while campaigning in Mullens, WV. Photo/Hank Walker.
May 4th, 1960: During the West Virginia primary, JFK and Sen. Humphrey had a key televised debate over Channel 8, WCHS-TV, in Charleston, WV.
May 4th, 1960: During the West Virginia primary, JFK and Sen. Humphrey had a key televised debate over Channel 8, WCHS-TV, in Charleston, WV.
June 27, 1960: JFK addressed the Montana State Democratic Convention in Helena, and attended other events at the Marlow Theater and Civic Center. Ted Kennedy and Sargent Shriver were with JFK on this visit.
June 27, 1960: JFK addressed the Montana State Democratic Convention in Helena, and attended other events at the Marlow Theater and Civic Center. Ted Kennedy and Sargent Shriver were with JFK on this visit.
July 10th: JFK chats with sister Pat during fundraising dinner at the Beverly Hilton Hotel, with VIP guests such as Frank Sinatra (rt). Photo, L.A. Mirror-News.
July 10th: JFK chats with sister Pat during fundraising dinner at the Beverly Hilton Hotel, with VIP guests such as Frank Sinatra (rt). Photo, L.A. Mirror-News.
Part of a 3-panel Kennedy-Johnson flyer on “human rights for every American” –  to work, education, just compensation, live where he chooses, “security in sickness;” to vote, speak, read and worship as he pleases, and to be free from the terror of war – taken from a July 1960 JFK speech before the NAACP in L.A.
Part of a 3-panel Kennedy-Johnson flyer on “human rights for every American” – to work, education, just compensation, live where he chooses, “security in sickness;” to vote, speak, read and worship as he pleases, and to be free from the terror of war – taken from a July 1960 JFK speech before the NAACP in L.A.
July 10, 1960: Hollywood star Judy Garland, center, flanked by Adlai Stevenson and JFK during  fundraising event at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in L.A. during the DNC.
July 10, 1960: Hollywood star Judy Garland, center, flanked by Adlai Stevenson and JFK during fundraising event at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in L.A. during the DNC.
July 15: At the close of the DNC, JFK delivers his “New Frontier” speech at the L.A. Coliseum to an audience of 80,000. VIPs Stevenson, Humphrey and Symington are behind him as some “Kennedy Girls” look on as well.
July 15: At the close of the DNC, JFK delivers his “New Frontier” speech at the L.A. Coliseum to an audience of 80,000. VIPs Stevenson, Humphrey and Symington are behind him as some “Kennedy Girls” look on as well.
July 19, 1960: Look magazine's story: "The Kennedys: A Family Political Machine."
July 19, 1960: Look magazine's story: "The Kennedys: A Family Political Machine."
Aug 20th, Omaha, NE: JFK at Offutt AFB for briefing on SAC operations with Gen. Thomas S. Power (r), Strategic Air Command chief, and Gen. Curtis LeMay, Air Force vice chief of staff.  AP photo.
Aug 20th, Omaha, NE: JFK at Offutt AFB for briefing on SAC operations with Gen. Thomas S. Power (r), Strategic Air Command chief, and Gen. Curtis LeMay, Air Force vice chief of staff. AP photo.
Sept 6, 1960: JFK’s car in Spokane, WA is surrounded by crowds in downtown area as he campaigns with Gov. Albert D. Rosellini (L) and Sen. Henry “Scoop” Jackson (waving), then DNC chairman.
Sept 6, 1960: JFK’s car in Spokane, WA is surrounded by crowds in downtown area as he campaigns with Gov. Albert D. Rosellini (L) and Sen. Henry “Scoop” Jackson (waving), then DNC chairman.
Sept 12, 1960: In an attempt to quell questions about his Catholic religion and a Catholic becoming president, JFK gave an eloquent and convincing speech to the Ministers' Association of Greater Houston, addressing some 600 clergy and guests, taking their questions, and generally defusing a major issue that had dogged his campaign.
Sept 12, 1960: In an attempt to quell questions about his Catholic religion and a Catholic becoming president, JFK gave an eloquent and convincing speech to the Ministers' Association of Greater Houston, addressing some 600 clergy and guests, taking their questions, and generally defusing a major issue that had dogged his campaign.
Oct 14, 1960: Just before 2:00 a.m., thousands of students at the Univ. of Michigan greet JFK on the steps of the Michigan Union to hear his call for a “Peace Corps.”
Oct 14, 1960: Just before 2:00 a.m., thousands of students at the Univ. of Michigan greet JFK on the steps of the Michigan Union to hear his call for a “Peace Corps.”
Oct 17, 1960: JFK beset by a group of female admirers at the Dayton, OH airport – Life magazine would call JFK’s rock-star treatment “the adoration phenomenon.”
Oct 17, 1960: JFK beset by a group of female admirers at the Dayton, OH airport – Life magazine would call JFK’s rock-star treatment “the adoration phenomenon.”
Oct 24, 1960: JFK spoke before some 10,000 college students and faculty who packed the University of Illinois Quad at Urbana to hear him speak on foreign policy. It was the first political speech allowed on university property since the 1870s.
Oct 24, 1960: JFK spoke before some 10,000 college students and faculty who packed the University of Illinois Quad at Urbana to hear him speak on foreign policy. It was the first political speech allowed on university property since the 1870s.
Spring 1960: During the primaries, and traveling aboard ‘The Caroline,” photographer  Jacques Lowe caught Kennedy with one of his “calming props” – here holding a cigar. JFK used cigars, lit and unlit, during conversation and while working on strategy, but mostly in private. He preferred the narrower size, including one favorite, Cuba's Petit Upmann. Click for video vignette.
Spring 1960: During the primaries, and traveling aboard ‘The Caroline,” photographer Jacques Lowe caught Kennedy with one of his “calming props” – here holding a cigar. JFK used cigars, lit and unlit, during conversation and while working on strategy, but mostly in private. He preferred the narrower size, including one favorite, Cuba's Petit Upmann. Click for video vignette.
Nov 1960: A few days before the election, in early November, Kennedy’s campaign made a blitz of New England, bringing out tens of thousands.  Here the Bridgeport, CT ‘Sunday Herald’ notes an expected turnout.
Nov 1960: A few days before the election, in early November, Kennedy’s campaign made a blitz of New England, bringing out tens of thousands. Here the Bridgeport, CT ‘Sunday Herald’ notes an expected turnout.
Nov 4: JFK campaigning at airport rally at Woodrum Field, Roanoke, VA, four days before the election.
Nov 4: JFK campaigning at airport rally at Woodrum Field, Roanoke, VA, four days before the election.
Jan 20, 1961: Famous photo taken by AP’s  Henry Burroughs of Jackie touching her husband’s face on Inauguration Day in the Capitol, a private moment in which she was expressing how proud she was; a moment she would later describe as “so much more emotional than any kiss because his eyes really did fill with tears.”
Jan 20, 1961: Famous photo taken by AP’s Henry Burroughs of Jackie touching her husband’s face on Inauguration Day in the Capitol, a private moment in which she was expressing how proud she was; a moment she would later describe as “so much more emotional than any kiss because his eyes really did fill with tears.”

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Russell Baker, “Nixon Criticizes Kennedy’s Views About Presidency; Says Senator Is Confusing ‘Table Pounding’ With Strong Leadership Eisenhower Defended He Gets Results by Using Persuasion, Vice President Asserts…,” New York Times, January 17, 1960, p. 1.

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“Kennedy Says We Should Err On Side Of Safety In Spending For Defense,” Washington Post /Times Herald, February 21, 1960.

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Edward T. Folliard, “Triumph for Kennedy Not Up to Expectations” (re: Wisconsin victory), Washington Post / Times Herald, April 6, 1960, p. A-1.

W. H. Lawrence, “’Stop Kennedy’ Drive Led By Byrd of West Virginia; Coalition Being Formed to Support Humphrey in Primary…,” New York Times, April 11, 1960, p. 1.

Chalmers M. Roberts, “Supporters of 3 Absent Candidates Gang Up on Kennedy in West Virginia,” Washington Post/Times Herald, April 14, 1960, p. A-1.

Carroll Kilpatrick, “Kennedy Opens Fire On Bigotry; He Takes Offensive In W.Va; Charges Plot to Beat Him; Kennedy Strikes at Religious Issue, Charges ‘Gang-Up'; Sees Rival a Stalking-Horse, Points to State Problems,” Washington Post/Times Herald, April 19, 1960, p. A-1.

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Richard F. Shepard, “Senator Kennedy to Be Paar Guest; Candidate Will Appear Next Thursday — Visit Raises Issue of Equal Time,” New York Times, June 9, 1960.

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Interview by P.L. Prattis, Editor, “Senator Kennedy’s Answers” (civil rights issues), The Pittsburgh Press, June 22, 1960.

Clayton Knowles, “Kennedy’s Reply to Truman Asks Young Leaders; Senator Contends ‘Strength and Vigor’ Are Required in the White House, Refuses to Withdraw; Also Rejects Charge That Convention Is ‘Rigged’ — Cites Primary Victories,” New York Times, July 5, 1960, p. 1.

John D. Morris, (Washington, DC, July 5, 1960) “Johnson Enters Race Officially; Sees 500 Votes; Texan Says Kennedy Will Receive Fewer than 600 on the First Ballot; Health Issue Is Barred; Majority Leader Criticizes New Englander Obliquely — Cheered by Backers Johnson Enters Race Officially; Predicts Victory at Los Angeles,” New York Times, July 6, 1960.

James Reston, New York Times columnist, “Convention Marks The End of Political Boss Era and Shift to a New Generation,” Los Angles Times, July 10, 1960.

“Cheers and Boos Greet Kennedy at Rights Rally; Senator Calls for Action Against Racial Discrimination at White House Level,” Los Angeles Times, July 11, 1960, p. 3.

“Delegates Boo Negro; But Sammy Davis Jr. Is Also Applauded at Convention,” New York Times, July 12, 1960.

“Demos Decide Today; Kennedy Out in Front,” Los Angeles Times, July 13, 1960, p. 1.

John D. Morris, “Johnson Strives to Halt Kennedy; They Meet in a TV ‘Debate’ — Texan Criticizes Rival on Senate Absenteeism..,” New York Times, July 13, 1960, p. 1.

Kyle Palmer, “Liberals Nail Kennedy To Their Platform,” Los Angles Times, July 13, 1960.

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“To The New Frontier,” Time, July 25, 1960.

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“Kennedy Accepts Nixon TV Debate; Vice President Is Agreeable but Bars Reading Notes — 8 Hours Proposed,” New York Times, July 29, 1960.

“The Race Is On,” New York Times Magazine, August 14, 1960.

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“Kennedy Wins!” San Francisco Examiner, November 9, 1960.

“Kennedy’s Victory Won By Close Margin; He Promises Fight For World Freedom; Eisenhower Offers ‘Orderly Transition’,” New York Times, November 11, 1960, p 1.

Gladwin Hill, “Election Pleases the Movie World; Even Hollywood Republicans Are Gratified by Role of TV and Films in Victory,” New York Times, November 11, 1960.

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“Hollywood: Happy as a Clan,” Time, Monday, December 5, 1960.

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“WSB-TV Newsfilm Clip of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Leaving the Georgia State Prison in the Company of Donald Hollowell, Ralph D. Abernathy, and Wyatt T. Walker, Reidsville, Georgia, 1960 October 27,” Civil Rights Digital Libary.

“Robert F. Kennedy Secures the Release of Martin Luther King, Jr. from Prison,” NBC News, New York, NY: NBC Universal, May 28,1993, via NBCLearn.com.

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Bill Archer, “John F. Kennedy Wins the Hearts of Southern West Virginia Coalfield Voters,” Bluefield Daily Telegraph (West Virginia), November 22, 2013.

Tom Vogt, “1960 Miss Vancouver Recalls Meeting JFK; Carol Erlandson Snyder Gave Him Key to Vancouver During Campaign Stop in Portland,” Columbian.com, Novem- ber 22, 2013.

“Photo Vault: JFK’s 1960 Visit to Warm Springs, Georgia,” Atlanta Journal-Constitution (Atlanta, GA).

“The Kennedy-Nixon Debates: When TV Changed the Game,” Life.com.

“John F. Kennedy and Television,” JFredMacDonald.com.

“Kennedy-Nixon Debates,” Archive of American Television.

Borys Krawczeniuk, “JFK Visit to NEPA Still Stirs Memories,” The Citizens Voice (Wilkes-Barre, PA), November 22, 2013.

“The 1960 Democratic Convention – Part 1″ (Video Highlights, July 11 &12), YouTube.com.

“The 1960 Democratic Convention – Part 2” (Video Highlights, July 13-15), YouTube.com.

“John F. Kennedy Pictures,” Time.com.

“Salinger’s JFK-Cuban Cigar Stories,” YouTube.com, Uploaded by Janson Media, July 26, 2007.

_______________________________






“JFK’s Early Campaign”
1959

August 1959: Senator John F. Kennedy during session with the press in Omaha, Nebraska.  Photo, Jacques Lowe.
August 1959: Senator John F. Kennedy during session with the press in Omaha, Nebraska. Photo, Jacques Lowe.
     Senator John F. Kennedy would not officially announce his presidential candidacy until January 1960.  In 1959, however, he continued his “informal campaign” for president,  then in its third year.  In his travels, Kennedy had made a practice of issuing denials of a presidential bid as he went. Still, he was running, and running hard, and most Democratic party insiders knew that well by 1959. Back in Washington, meanwhile, by mid February 1959, a “stop Kennedy” movement had begun forming among his rivals. 

     During the year, he would spar with critics and challengers attempting to derail his bid to win the Democratic nomination.  In early March 1959, his Catholic faith surfaced in the media  after Look magazine ran an interview that quoted him at length on the issue.  That brought both pro- and anti-Catholic voices into the fray.  Kennedy’s Catholicism, in fact – no matter how many times he would seek to explain his firm belief in separation of church and state, that his sole allegiance would be to his oath as president, that he would not be “controlled by the Pope,” etc., etc. – would dog him until election day.

March 6, 1959: JFK, 41, and Jacqueline Kennedy, 29, arriving at airport, Salt Lake City, Utah.  Deseret News.
March 6, 1959: JFK, 41, and Jacqueline Kennedy, 29, arriving at airport, Salt Lake City, Utah. Deseret News.
     But throughout 1959, Kennedy traveled the length and breadth of the land, with a full schedule of speeches and public appearances.  In August, for example, Kennedy was the main attraction at a gathering in Omaha, Nebraska at the home of Bernard Boyle, a Democratic national committeeman. 

     At the event, known locally as “Bernie’s Barbeque,” Kennedy gave a brief speech and signed some copies of his book Profiles in Courage.  He also told the 400 or so people and press assembled there that the May 10th,1960 Nebraska primary would be key to his election plan. Photographer Jacques Lowe had traveled with Kennedy to the Omaha event, and he snapped one of his iconic photos of Kennedy, displayed in the first photo above, with JFK projecting a relaxed, confident demeanor as press and visitors gathered around him.
 

On October 16th, 1959 in Crowley, LA, at the Int’l Rice Festival, Senator Kennedy did the honors of crowning the new Rice Queen, Judith Ann Haydel. E. Reggie Archive.
On October 16th, 1959 in Crowley, LA, at the Int’l Rice Festival, Senator Kennedy did the honors of crowning the new Rice Queen, Judith Ann Haydel. E. Reggie Archive.
     Kennedy’s travels in 1959 took him to a variety of venues – from the International Rice Festival in Crowley, Louisiana where, among other things, he crowned that year’s Rice Queen, to Duluth, Minnesota where he appeared in a live broadcast on a local TV show.  Kennedy also visited the Midwest in 1959, including Ohio, Illinois and Wisconsin.  He also toured California and Oregon; met with Chicago Mayor Richard Daley at a World Series baseball game at Comiskey Park; and at one stop in Wisconisn, spotted a St. Louis Cardinals baseball team bus and sought out the famous star, Stan Musial, to campaign for him.  There were also stops at a U.S. Steel Co. coal cleaning plant in West Virginia; a talk before a lady garment workers conference in Miami Beach; Jefferson-Jackson Day dinner speeches in various cities;  and appearances before some state legislatures, including those in Tennessee and Montana.  And as he had done for Democrats in the new state of Alaska in 1958, campaigning for state  candidates as Alaska held its first elections, Kennedy visited Hawaii in July 1959 to stump for Democratic candidates there as Hawaii held its first elections later that month.  But during his political travels of 1959, Kennedy had some difficult moments too, especially when he faced meager turnouts, as he was still unknown in many locations.  “In Oregon,” recalled photographer Jacques Lowe who traveled with JFK for part of 1959, “Kennedy walked into a union hall to find eleven men waiting to hear him.”  Undeterred, according to Lowe, JFK didn’t miss a step.  “Without hesitation, he launched into his speech.”

October 1959: Sparse greeting committee on hand as JFK, Jackie, & Pierre Salinger arrive in Portland, Oregon.  Photo, Jacques Lowe.
October 1959: Sparse greeting committee on hand as JFK, Jackie, & Pierre Salinger arrive in Portland, Oregon. Photo, Jacques Lowe.
     In presidential polling that year, Kennedy wasn’t always the top choice of voters, or even considered at the top of the ticket.  One Gallup poll of July 22, 1959 had JFK running as Adlai Stevenson’s V.P., with that ticket beating a Nixon- Rockefeller slate by 53%-to- 42%, with 5% undecided.  Other polls could and did vary widely, depending on who was making them and the audience being polled.  In August 1959, a Congressional Quarterly survey of Democrats in Congress had Senator Lyndon Johnson (D-TX) as the top choice with 32 percent, followed by Sen. Stuart Symington (D-MO) and Adlai Stevenson (D-IL), each with 18 percent.  JFK was fourth in that poll with 17 percent. But a Gallup Poll of August 14, 1959 had Kennedy and Stevenson tied for the lead, each at 26 percent, with others far behind.  The Chicago Sun Times, a paper with Republican leanings, offered an editorial on the two August polls, stating the Democrats were “a party in search of a candidate.”

Sept 1959: JFK featured on the cover of a Duluth, MN TV Guide booklet for week of Sept 26-Oct 2, as Kennedy was then slated to appear on KDAL-TV, Sept 26, before a live audience. Also shown on the cover are local newsmen, Dick Anthony and Mundo DeYoannes.
Sept 1959: JFK featured on the cover of a Duluth, MN TV Guide booklet for week of Sept 26-Oct 2, as Kennedy was then slated to appear on KDAL-TV, Sept 26, before a live audience. Also shown on the cover are local newsmen, Dick Anthony and Mundo DeYoannes.
     During 1959, Kennedy was also still forming his campaign team.  On September 1, 1959, Pierre Salinger joined JFK’s campaign staff.   Already working for Kennedy in Washington and elsewhere was a core group of insiders including Ted Sorensen, Larry O’Brien, Kenny O’Donnell, Lou Harris, and others.  JFK’s younger brother, Bobby, who had formally resigned his Senate Committee position, joined the campaign full-time in September 1959 and would become campaign manager.  

     Stephen Smith, JFK’s brother-in-law,  married to  Jean Kennedy, had opened up a Kennedy campaign headquarters  in January 1959 at the Esso building in Washington, DC.  Smith and other members of  Kennedy’s staff and family would also travel with JFK  in various combinations as he toured the country in 1959.  But Jackie Kennedy, in particular,  traveled with him frequently that year,  and was with him on some of his loneliest and most difficult campaign stops — including those where JFK was still an unknown quantity, playing second fiddle to local politicians or given “less-than-spotlight” positions in farm shows, high school assemblies, and union hall meetings.

     By September 1959, Kennedy and his team began using their own private plane for campaign travel — a Convair 240 series — which helped smooth some of  the logistics and hassles of campaigning.  The 1948 airplane was purchased by JFK’s father, Joseph P. Kennedy, retrofitted for campaign use, and leased to the campaign though a Kennedy company.  The plane, named The Caroline after JFK’s daughter, was a twin-engine craft with Pratt & Whitney R-2800 engines.  As the campaigning intensified through the following year, The Caroline would provide great travel range and flexibility, and thereby, some advantage to Kennedy over his competitors.

     Back in the Senate, meanwhile, JFK kept up with his responsibilities there, attending hearings and working on range of issues, including labor reform legislation, which did not emerge to Kennedy’s liking or labor’s, but did manage to make some improvements.  In his Senate capacity, Kennedy was also involved in national defense issues, civil rights matters, aid to cities, foreign affairs issues, and education, among others.  He also continued to write articles that would occasionally appear in the popular press, publishing, for example, a TV Guide article on November 14, 1959 on the role of television in politics, billed on the cover as, “How TV Revolutionized Politics by Sen. John F. Kennedy.”

Nov 12, 1959: Senator John F. Kennedy visiting with townspeople in River Falls, Wisconsin.
Nov 12, 1959: Senator John F. Kennedy visiting with townspeople in River Falls, Wisconsin.
     Other Democratic candidates also began entering the presidential sweepstakes in 1959, either directly or through surrogates.  On July 14, 1959 Minnesota Senator Eugene McCarthy and Governor Orville Freeman announced that Minnesota Senator Hubert Humphrey, would be a candidate for president.  In October 1959, U.S. Rep. Sam Rayburn (D-TX), then Speaker of the House, announced the creation of a Johnson-for-President Committee signaling the candidacy of Senator Lyndon B. Johnson of Texas, Senate Majority leader.  And in late December, Senator Wayne Morse entered the Oregon primary as a favorite son.  On December 30th, 1959, Senator Humphrey made his candidacy official.  A few days earlier on the Republican side, presidential candidate, New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller, withdrew from his party’s race.  Vice President Richard Nixon now had clear sailing to the Republican nomination.

     Senator Kennedy and his team, meanwhile, in late October 1959, began preparing for the official presidential race the following year, 1960 – a tough year ahead with Democratic Primary battles in the spring leading up to the National Democratic Convention in July.…At the meeting, JFK shone forth as his own brilliant strategist, giving a three-hour presentation that was essentially a detailed political survey of the entire country, with- out notes…  On October 28, 1959, a core group of a dozen or more key advisors and staff assembled with Kennedy and his brother Bobby at Hyannis Port, MA.  This group had come together to plan political and election-year strategy, primarily for entering and winning a selection of Democratic primaries and winning the 1960 Democratic presidential nomination.  At the meeting, JFK shone forth as his own brilliant strategist, giving a three-hour presentation that was essentially a detailed political survey of the entire country, without notes, amazing all those assembled.  “What I remember,” said Lawrence O’Brien, recounting JFK’s performance to journalist Theodore White, “was his remarkable knowledge of every state, not just the Party leaders, not just the Senators in Washington, but he knew all the factions and key people in all the factions.”  Ted Sorensen added that JFK was not only the best candidate, but “the best campaign manager too,” a guy who had an incredible capacity for names, dates and places, and a solid grasp of where he was liked and not liked and why.

1959: JFK captured by photographer Gene Barnes as he addressed a California women’s group in Pomona.
1959: JFK captured by photographer Gene Barnes as he addressed a California women’s group in Pomona.
     Toward the end of 1959, Senator Kennedy began picking up larger crowds in his campaigning.  Still, after three years on the road, the grind of it all no doubt took its toll.  Yet those who watched Kennedy up close during this time had mostly good reviews, especially in how JFK treated his audience, as photographer Jacques Lowe later observed:

“If there was anything truly impressive about the Kennedy of the 1959 ‘undercover’ campaign it was this:  He never talked down to an audience.  If he was addressing a farm group, he didn’t play the cornball or insert small-talk in his speech.  He spoke about man’s higher aspirations – simply and never too distantly.  His listeners went away occasionally uplifted, occasionally unimpressed, but never patronized.”

     What follows below is an abbreviated listing of some of JFK’s travel and speaking itinerary for the year 1959, highlighted with photographs and a few magazine covers from that year. A number of his speeches from 1959 are also listed below in “Sources, Links & Additional Information” at the bottom of this article.  See also at this website additional stories on JFK’s “road to the White House,” including separate stories on his campaigning in 1957 and 1958, as well as other stories such as, “The Jack Pack, 1958-1960.”  Stay tuned to this website for additional JFK stories in the future.  Thanks for visiting – and please consider supporting this website.  Thank you. - Jack Doyle

 

JFK’s 1959 Campaigning
Speeches, Dinners, Media, Democratic Party Activity, Etc.,.
January-December 1959

 

One of JFK’s visits in 1959 was the Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, TN, where he visited in February along with wife Jacqueline. DOE photo.
One of JFK’s visits in 1959 was the Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, TN, where he visited in February along with wife Jacqueline. DOE photo.
Feb 1959: Jackie & JFK at Oak Ridge Nat’l Labs, Oak Ridge, TN, with Alvin Weinberg and Sen. Al Gore, Sr.
Feb 1959: Jackie & JFK at Oak Ridge Nat’l Labs, Oak Ridge, TN, with Alvin Weinberg and Sen. Al Gore, Sr.
ORNL Director, Alvin Weinberg briefing JFK at the Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor, 1959. DOE photos.
ORNL Director, Alvin Weinberg briefing JFK at the Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor, 1959. DOE photos.
May 9, 1959: Senator Kennedy (left) with Senator Jennings Randolph (white hat) and coal miners, U. S. Steel Cleaning Plant, Gary, WV. WV state archives.
May 9, 1959: Senator Kennedy (left) with Senator Jennings Randolph (white hat) and coal miners, U. S. Steel Cleaning Plant, Gary, WV. WV state archives.
June 1, 1959: JFK on the cover of Newsweek magazine, as the religion issue gets top billing in an early survey for the 1960 race.
June 1, 1959: JFK on the cover of Newsweek magazine, as the religion issue gets top billing in an early survey for the 1960 race.
Portion of front page from “The Ohio State Morning Lantern” newspaper, Columbus, Ohio, July 2, 1959 reporting on JFK visit to the state in late June 1959.
Portion of front page from “The Ohio State Morning Lantern” newspaper, Columbus, Ohio, July 2, 1959 reporting on JFK visit to the state in late June 1959.
Sept 19, 1959: Senator John F. Kennedy giving speech at Ohio University, Athens, Ohio. Photo, JFK Presidential Library.
Sept 19, 1959: Senator John F. Kennedy giving speech at Ohio University, Athens, Ohio. Photo, JFK Presidential Library.
Sept. 27 1959: Senator John F. Kennedy and Cleveland Mayor Anthony Celebrezze are featured speakers at the Cuyahoga County Democratic Steer Roast.
Sept. 27 1959: Senator John F. Kennedy and Cleveland Mayor Anthony Celebrezze are featured speakers at the Cuyahoga County Democratic Steer Roast.
Oct 1959: JFK courting Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley at Comiskey Park during Dodgers-White Sox World Series game, along with  baseball commissioner  "Happy" Chandler (with hat) and Daley’s son, Richard M., then a state senator, in foreground. Chicago Sun-Times.
Oct 1959: JFK courting Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley at Comiskey Park during Dodgers-White Sox World Series game, along with baseball commissioner "Happy" Chandler (with hat) and Daley’s son, Richard M., then a state senator, in foreground. Chicago Sun-Times.
Oct 5, 1959: Ticket for local dinner at the Hotel Clark in Hastings, NE, featuring Senator John F. Kennedy.
Oct 5, 1959: Ticket for local dinner at the Hotel Clark in Hastings, NE, featuring Senator John F. Kennedy.
Oct 1959: JFK speaking at the Int’l Rice Festival in Crowley, LA where he and Jackie were hosted by Judge Edmund Reggie, at left, dark suit.  E. Reggie Archive.
Oct 1959: JFK speaking at the Int’l Rice Festival in Crowley, LA where he and Jackie were hosted by Judge Edmund Reggie, at left, dark suit. E. Reggie Archive.
Oct 1959: Senator John F. Kennedy addressing a crowd of some 130,000 at the Louisiana Rice Festival in Crowley, Louisiana.  Photo, Edmund Reggie archive.
Oct 1959: Senator John F. Kennedy addressing a crowd of some 130,000 at the Louisiana Rice Festival in Crowley, Louisiana. Photo, Edmund Reggie archive.
Nov. 2, 1959: Senator Kennedy giving an address at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), CA.
Nov. 2, 1959: Senator Kennedy giving an address at the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA), CA.
Nov. 1959: JFK with California Gov. Pat Brown on Kennedy’s visit to So. California.  Brown was a likely “favorite son” candidate in California’s June 1960 primary, which JFK would not enter. (L.A. Mirror-News).
Nov. 1959: JFK with California Gov. Pat Brown on Kennedy’s visit to So. California. Brown was a likely “favorite son” candidate in California’s June 1960 primary, which JFK would not enter. (L.A. Mirror-News).
Fall 1959: A Jacques Lowe photo of JFK, Jackie and brother-in-law Steve Smith (back to camera) at an Oregon diner. JFK then was still unknown in many locations.
Fall 1959: A Jacques Lowe photo of JFK, Jackie and brother-in-law Steve Smith (back to camera) at an Oregon diner. JFK then was still unknown in many locations.
November 12, 1959: JFK with students at River Falls State College, River Falls, WI.  JFK did not appear bothered by the signmaker’s difficulty in spelling his name.
November 12, 1959: JFK with students at River Falls State College, River Falls, WI. JFK did not appear bothered by the signmaker’s difficulty in spelling his name.
Nov. 1959: JFK in a quiet moment gazing into a tug boat’s wake during a tour of Coos Bay, Oregon. (Jacques Lowe).
Nov. 1959: JFK in a quiet moment gazing into a tug boat’s wake during a tour of Coos Bay, Oregon. (Jacques Lowe).
Nov 30, 1959: JFK in Denver, CO where he gave an address to the American Municipal Assoc.  Cleveland mayor Anthony J. Celebrezze is seated and Jackson, MS mayor Allen C. Thompson is greeting Kennedy.
Nov 30, 1959: JFK in Denver, CO where he gave an address to the American Municipal Assoc. Cleveland mayor Anthony J. Celebrezze is seated and Jackson, MS mayor Allen C. Thompson is greeting Kennedy.
 

Jan-Feb-Mar 1959

Jan 15: Charlotte, NC, Chamber of Com
Jan 31: Phila., PA, Roosevelt Day Dinner
Feb 2: Boston, Harvard /Neiman Fellows
Feb 11: Wash., DC, Rural Electric Co-ops
Feb 15: CBS-TV,  Face the Nation
Feb 24: Oak Ridge, TN, Rotary Club Speech
Feb 24: Oak Ridge National Labs Tour
Feb 24: Nashville, TN, Democratic Dinner
Feb 25: Nashville, Tennessee Legislature
Mar 2: Wash., D.C., AFL-CIO Speech
Mar 3: Look magazine, JFK interview
Mar 6: Medford, OR, Roosevelt Day Dinner
Mar 6: Salt Lake City, UT, Roosevelt Dinner
Mar 7: Boise, ID, Jefferson-Jackson Dinner
Mar 8: Butte, MT, Jeff-Jackson Dinner
Mar 8: Helena, MT, Montana Legislature
Mar 17: Providence, RI, St. Patrick’s Dinner
Mar 21: Wash., DC, No. Carolina Dem Club
Mar 25: Wash., DC, Nat’l Grain Co-ops

 

April 1959

Apr 1: Palm Beach, FL, Strategy Mtg.
Apr 4: Akron, OH, Sheraton-Mayflower
Apr 4: Akron, Beacon-Journal interview
Apr 4: Akron, Jefferson-Jackson Dinner
Apr 5: Canton, OH
Apr 5: Cleveland, OH
Apr 5: Newark , NJ
Apr 5: NY City, Lunch, Brook Club
Apr 5: NY City, Adolph Toigo
Apr 9: Milwaukee, WI, Gridiron Dinner
Apr 10: Beloit, WI, Beloit College
Apr 10: Janesville, WI, Union Hall
Apr 12: Indianapolis, Negro College Fund
Apr 13: Indianapolis, Nat’l Library Week
Apr 13: Lafayette, Indiana
Apr 15: Wash., DC, Methodist Bishops
Apr 16: Wash., DC, Civil Liberties Conf
Apr 16: Cleveland, OH, Cleveland Press
Apr 27: College Pk., Univ. of Maryland
Apr 30: NY, NY, Women in Radio & TV

 

May 1959

May 1: Sacramento, CA, State Legislature
May 1: Los Angeles, Press Club of L.A.
May 4: Wash., DC, Int’l Conf. India/U.S.
May 8: Boston, MA, LBJ & Truman Dinner
May 9: Gary, WV, US Steel Cleaning Plant
May 9: Welch, WV, Fundraising /Coal Spch
May 15: Miami Bch, Lady Garment Workers
May 19: Portland, OR, Dinner
May 21: Buffalo, NY, Grv. Cleveland Dinner
May 23: Detroit, MI, Jeff-Jack Dinner
May 24: Chicago, Daily News Youth Awards

 

June 1959

June 1: Cover story, Newsweek magazine
June 3: NY City, Cap & Millinery Workers
June 6: Garden City, NY, Dem. Dinner
June 8: Boston, MA, J.F. Chapman
June 11: Harvard Commencement
June 15: Bethesda, MD, Chevy Chase H.S.
June 16: Ocean City, Leag. of Municipalities
June 19: Seattle, WA, Press Conference
June 19: Seattle, KIRO Radio (Jackie)
June 19: Seattle, JFK- KING TV taping
June 19: Seattle, WA, Post-Intelligencer
June 19: Seattle, Jackie – Dem. Women
June 20: Seattle, Jackie – Women’s Clubs
June 20: Seattle, Eagles Convention
June 20: Seattle, Seattle Times visit
June 20: Seattle, KIRO-TV panel
June 20: Seattle, KIRO-Radio
June 20: Seattle, Jeff-Jack Day Dinner
June 20: Seattle, Democrats /Olympic Hotel
June 21: Seattle, Morning Mass
June 21: Tacoma, WA, Breakfast meeting
June 21: Yakima, WA, Press Conference
June 21: Yakima, Democratic Dinner
June 22: Flight to Chicago-Washington, DC
June 27: Columbus, OH, Press Conference
June 27: Bellaire, OH, Jeff-Jack Day Dinner
June 28: NY, NY, Society of African Culture

 

July-August 1959

July 2: Dallas, TX, State Junior Bar
July 3-4-5: Hawaii Tour & Dem. Candidates
July 13: Spring Lake, NJ, Gov’s Day Picnic
July 30: Milwaukee, TV Taping, WTTI
July 30: Milwaukee, WTNJ, Open Qs
July 30-31: Milwaukee, D.A.’s Convention
Aug 1: Portland, OR, Press Conference
Aug 1: Portland, Broiler Restaurant Mtg.
Aug 1: Portland, Portland Journal
Aug 1: Portland, Portland Oregonian
Aug 1: Portland, Dave Epps Mem. Dinner
Aug 2: Portland, Church/Mass
Aug 2: Portland, Young Dems Coffee Hour
Aug 2: Portland, Conference
Aug 2: Portland, TV/Bob Holmes/KOIN
Aug 2: Portland, TV/Viewpoint/McCall
Aug 2: Portland, Edith Green Reception
Aug 3: Seaside, OR, AFL-CIO Speech/TV
Aug 3: Seaside, OR, Dinner/G. Brown
Aug 3: Portland, TV/Fennel Program
Aug 9: Omaha, NE, Picnic & Press Conf.
Aug 29: Jackie Kennedy, Life cover story

 

September 1959

Sep 1: Pierre Salinger joins JFK
Sep 11: San Francisco, AFL-CIO
Sep 15: Columbus, OH, Arrival
Sep 16: Columbus, OH, Bankers Assoc.
Sep 16: Columbus, Ohio Academy G.P.
Sep 17: Oxford, OH, Miami University
Sep 17: Cincinnati, Campaign Hdqtrs
Sep 17: Cincinnati, Dem. Luncheon
Sep 17: Cincinnati, TV/Radio Press Conf
Sep 17: Cincinnati, High School Editors
Sep 17: Dayton, OH, Press Conference
Sep 17: Dayton, OH, County Bar Assn.
Sep 18: Akron, OH, Press Conference
Sep 18: Akron, League of Municipalities
Sep 18: Athens, OH, Ohio University
Sep 18: Athens, Ohio University Rally
Sep 19: Bowling Green Univ. Reception
Sep 19: Toledo, OH, Dem. Luncheon
Sep 19: Toledo, Press Conf, Perry Hotel
Sep 19: Toledo, Lucas Co. Dem. Picnic
Sep 19: Youngstown, OH, Dem. Dinner
Sep 20: Newport News, VA
Sep 20: Pt. Comfort, Va. Municipalities
Sep 20: Washington, D.C.
Sep 24: Madison, WI, Labor Leaders
Sep 24: Madison, Press /Park Hotel
Sep 24: Madison, Capital Times
Sep 24: Darlington, WI, Luncheon spch
Sep 24: Flatteville, WI, State College spch
Sep 24: Lancaster, WI, Court House spch
Sep 24: Prairie du Chein, WI, private mtgs
Sep 24: Prairie du Chein, Dinner w/Dems
Sep 24: Prairie du…,  Checkerboard Aud.
Sep 25: Richland Cntr, WI, Highland Cntr.
Sep 25: Virogua, WI, Griole Café lunch
Sep 25: Sparta, WI, City Aud/Reception
Sep 25: LaCrosse, WI, State College speech
Sep 25: LaCrosse, TV appearance/taping
Sep 25: LaCrosse, Sawyer Aud. speech
Sep 26: Eau Claire, WI
Sep 26: Rice Lake, WI, Land of Lakes Hotel
Sep 26: Rhinelander, WI, A-port Press Conf
Sep 26: Rhinelander, Eagle Hall Temple
Sep 26: Duluth, MN, KDAL-TV, Live
Sep 26: Superior, MN, Central High School
Sep 27: Cleveland, OH, Dem Leaders Lunch
Sep 27: Cleveland, Euclid Beach Pk /Roast

 

October 1959

Oct 1: Rochester, NY, Temple B’rith Kodesh
Oct 2: Indianapolis, Mayor Boswell Dinner
Oct 4: Omaha, NE, evening arrival
Oct 5: Fremont, NE, Farm Policy
Oct 5: Columbus, NE, Farm Policy
Oct 5: Norfolk, NE, Farm Policy
Oct 5: Hastings, NE, Farm Policy & Dinner
Oct 9: Fayette City, PA, County Dem Dinner
Oct 10: Wheeling, WV, Airport Press Conf.
Oct 10: Wellsburg, WV w/ Sen. J. Randolph
Oct 10: Charleston, WV, w/Sen. J. Randolph
Oct 11: Westchester, NY, Dem Picnic
Oct 11: Westchester Country Club
Oct 11: New Haven, CT, Negro Reception
Oct 11: New Haven, Cocktail Party
Oct 11: New Haven, Democratic Women
Oct 12: Atlantic City, NJ, UAW Convention
Oct 12: Atlantic City, Small World taping
Oct 12: Washington, DC, Arrive Home
Oct 13: Lincoln, NE, Brkfst, Gov’s Mansion
Oct 13: Lincoln, Press Conference
Oct 13: Lincoln, Nebraskan Wesleyan Univ.
Oct 13: Lincoln, Service Clubs of Lincoln
Oct 13: Lincoln, Mtg w/ Nebraska Friends
Oct 13: Lincoln, Dem Recep / KETV Tape
Oct 13: Lincoln, NE, AFL-CIO St. Convnt’n
Oct 14: Kearney, NE, Teachers College
Oct 14: Kearney, Press Conference
Oct 14: Kearney, Reception
Oct 14: Grand Island, NE, Chamber of Com
Oct 14: North Platte, NE, Dem Reception
Oct 14: Scotts Bluff, NE, Dem Dinner
Oct 15: Baton Rouge, LA, Capitol Hse Hotel
Oct 15: New Orleans, Press Conference
Oct 15: New Orleans, Radio/TV News group
Oct 15: New Orleans, Candidates Reception
Oct 16: New Orleans, Negro Dem Leaders
Oct 16: Lafayette, LA, E. Reggie Reception
Oct 16: Lafayette, LA, Old Bourne C. Club
Oct 16: Crowley, LA, Int’l Rice Festival
Oct 16: Lake Charles, LA
Oct 17: Milwaukee, WI. Airport Press Conf.
Oct 17: Milwaukee, Pulaski Day / Poland
Oct 17: Waukesha, WI, Luncheon
Oct 17: Milwaukee, WISN-TV
Oct 17: Milwaukee, Schroeder Hotel Recep
Oct 18: San Francisco, CA, Press Conf
Oct 18: San Francisco, League of Calif Cities
Oct 18: San Francisco, Dem. Reception
Oct 18: Salem, OR, Arrival
Oct 20: Salem, Committee at Berg Home
Oct 20: Salem, Willamette University
Oct 20: Portland, OR, Municipalities Lunch
Oct 20: Portland, Coffee, YMCA
Oct 20: Portland, Clakamas County Dinner
Oct 21, Portland, Democratic Roundtable
Oct 21: Portland, Portland Realty Board
Oct 21: Portland, Portland State College
Oct 22: New York, NY, Al Smith Dinner
Oct 24: Bloomington, IL, Dem. Reception
Oct 24: Springfield, IL, Press Luncheon
Oct 24: Springfield, Midwest Farm Conf.
Oct 24: Joliet, IL, Local Dems
Oct 24: Joliet, IL, Democratic Dinner
Oct 24: Joliet, IL, American Legion Hall
Oct 25: Rockford, IL, Dem Breakfast
Oct 25: Rockford, IL, Tebala Shrine Temple
Oct 25: DeKalb, IL, County Chairmen
Oct 25: DeKalb, IL, Elk’s Club Luncheon
Oct 25: DeKalb, IL, Egyptian Theater
Oct 25: Rock Island/Moline, IL
Oct 25: Rock Island, IL, Dem Reception
Oct 25: Moline, IL, Le Claire Theatre Rally
Oct 26: Quincy, IL, TV Press Conference
Oct 26: Quincy, IL, Dem Reception
Oct 26: Quincy, IL, Quincy College
Oct 26: Peoria, IL, Democratic Luncheon
Oct 26: Peoria, IL, Press Conference
Oct 26: Decatur, IL, Reception
Oct 26: Decatur, Masonic Temple, Press
Oct 26: Decatur, Masonic Temple Dinner
Oct 26: Decatur, Masonic Temple TV Spch
Oct 28: Hyannis Port, MA, Strategy Mtg
Oct 30: Oakland, CA, Mills College speech
Oct 31: Bakersfield, CA, Press Conference
Oct 31: Santa Monica, CA, Airport Recep.
Oct 31: Lompoc, CA, La Purisma Inn Lunch
Oct 31: Lompoc High School
Oct 31: San Diego, CA, Press Conference
Oct 31: San Diego, John A. Vietor Reception
Oct 31: San Diego County Dems Dinner

 

November 1959

Nov 1: San Diego, CA
Nov 1: Burbank, CA, Lockheed Terminal
Nov 1: Hollywood, CBS-Taping, Inquiry
Nov 1: Riverside, CA, Press Conf
Nov 1: Riverside, Arnold Heights School
Nov 1: Anaheim, CA, Disneyland by Rail
Nov 1: Anaheim, Orange Co. Democrats
Nov 1: Los Angeles, CA, Reception
Nov 1: Los Angeles, Ambassador of Ceylon
Nov 2: Los Angeles, Press Conference
Nov 2: Los Angeles, UCLA Reception
Nov 2: Los Angeles, UCLA /Royce Hall
Nov 2: Los Angeles, U of So. Cal Reception
Nov 2: U of So. Cal, Address Student Rally
Nov 2: Los Angeles, Jeff-Jack Day Dinner
Nov 5: Klamath Falls, OR
Nov 6: Klamath Falls, OR, Democrats
Nov 6: Coos Bay, OR, Lions Club Luncheon
Nov 6: Coos Bay, Barge Trip of Harbor
Nov 6: Coos Bay, Democratic Dinner
Nov 7: Bend, OR, Jr. Chamber Luncheon
Nov 7: North Bend, OR, No. Bend H. S.
Nov 7: Pendleton, OR, Press Conference
Nov 7: Umatilla Co Dem Party Dinner
Nov 8: Milton-Freewater, OR, Reception
Nov 8: Walla Walla, Reception
Nov 8: Baker, OR, Democratic Dinner
Nov 8: Baker, OR, KBKR Radio
Nov 9: La Grande, Luncheon
Nov 9: La Grande, E. Oregon College
Nov 9: Portland, OR, Mtg. w/ Labor
Nov 12: Minneapolis, A-port Press Conf.
Nov 12: River Falls, WI, RF State College
Nov 12: Eau Claire, Elks Club Luncheon
Nov 12: Eau Claire, WI, EC State College
Nov 12: Eau Claire, WEAU-TV
Nov 12: Marshfield, WI, Hotel Charles
Nov 13: Portage, WI, Portage High School
Nov 13: Watertown, WI, Dem. Luncheon
Nov 13: Milwaukee, Marquette University
Nov 13: Kenosha, WI, Labor Leaders
Nov 13: Kenosha, WI, Dem State Convntn
Nov 13: Kenosha, Hotel Wisconsin Recep.
Nov 14: TV Guide, JFK on TV & Politics
Nov 14: Oklahoma City, OK, Press Conf
Nov 14: Norman, OK, OU-v-Army game
Nov 14: Oklahoma City, Jeff-Jack Dinner
Nov 15: Hyannis Port, MA
Nov 15: Augusta, ME, Gov. Clauson
Nov 15: Augusta, Dem. Party Dinner
Nov 16: Wash., DC, Nat’l Milk Producers
Nov 17: Wilmington, DE, DuPont/Hercules
Nov 17: Wilmington, Bldg. Trades Union
Nov 17: Wilmington, Press Conference
Nov 17: Wilm., DE, Brandywine 100 Dinner
Nov 19: Kansas City, MO, Arrival
Nov 19: Independence, MO, Harry Truman
Nov 19: Kansas City, Nat’l Guard Armory
Nov 19: Kansas City, Dem Luncheon
Nov 19: Kansas City, Local Labor Leaders
Nov 19: Wichita, KS, Labor Meeting
Nov 19: Wichita, Hotel Allis, Press Conf
Nov 19: Wichita, Democratic Reception
Nov 19: Wichita, Democratic Dinner
Nov 20: Wichita, Cerebral Palsy Home
Nov 20: Wichita, Wichita University
Nov 20: Dodge City, KS, Dem Reception
Nov 20: Hays, KS, Press Conference
Nov 20: Hays, KS, Democratic Dinner
Nov 21: Iowa City, IA, State Committee
Nov 21: Iowa City, Iowa Memorial Union
Nov 21: Iowa City, Speak at Reception
Nov 21: Iowa City, Univ. Club Luncheon
Nov 21: Iowa City, Iowa vs. Notre Dame
Nov 21: Des Moines, IA
Nov 21: Carroll, IA
Nov 28: Denver, CO, Democratic Dinner
Nov 28: Boulder, CO, Dem. Reception
Nov 29: Pueblo, CO, Democratic Dinner
Nov 30: Grand Junction, CO, Dem. Dinner
Nov 30: Denver, American Municipal Assn.

 

December 1959

Dec 2: Durham, NC, Duke University
Dec 7: NY City: Pres. Truman Reception
Dec 7: NY City, Eleanor Roosevelt Tribute
Dec 8: NY City
Dec 9: Nebraskans for Kennedy opens
Dec 10: Pittsburgh, PA, Bishop Wright
Dec 10: Pittsburgh, PA, Press Conf.
Dec 10: Pittsburgh, Univ of Pittsburgh
Dec 10: Pittsburgh, Dem. Luncheon
Dec 10: Pittsburgh, KDKA, “Sound Off”
Dec 10: Pittsburgh, WIIC-TV
Dec 10: Pittsburgh, Allegheny Bar Assn.
Dec 11: Gary, IN, Hotel Gary Reception
Dec 11: Gary, IN, Benefit Banquet
Dec 17: Washington Post: JFK to Announce

_______________________________
 
 
Note: This listing provides a rough overview of JFK’s 1959 travel itinerary, speeches, and other activities at the listed locations. Some dates and events are “best approximations” given uncertain and/or conflicting sourcing information. More detailed information on JFK’s activities at some of the these locations is available at the JFK Presidential Library in Boston. The full titles of a number of his major speeches in 1959 are included below, in the second half of “Sources.” More photos also follow below.

 

_______________________________

Date Posted: 10 September 2013
Last Update: 26 October 2014
Comments to: jdoyle@pophistorydig.com

Article Citation:
Jack Doyle, “JFK’s Early Campaign: 1959,”
PopHistoryDig.com, September 10, 2013.

_______________________________

 
 


 

Sources, Links & Additional Information

August 24, 1959: Life magazine cover story: “Jackie Kennedy, A Front Runner’s Appealing Wife.”
August 24, 1959: Life magazine cover story: “Jackie Kennedy, A Front Runner’s Appealing Wife.”
October 1959: Jackie Kennedy looking out on the scene at the Int’l Rice Festival in Crowley, LA, where JFK addressed a crowd of more than 130,000. Edmund Reggie archive.
October 1959: Jackie Kennedy looking out on the scene at the Int’l Rice Festival in Crowley, LA, where JFK addressed a crowd of more than 130,000. Edmund Reggie archive.
January 1959: Senator Kennedy and wife Jacqueline at reception of the North Carolina Chamber of Commerce.
January 1959: Senator Kennedy and wife Jacqueline at reception of the North Carolina Chamber of Commerce.
May 1959:  Senator John F. Kennedy being briefed by local officials in West Virginia in early May.
May 1959: Senator John F. Kennedy being briefed by local officials in West Virginia in early May.
1959: JFK spoke at a sold out Democratic party banquet at the Maxwell House Hotel in downtown Nashville, TN, late winter. Mayor Ben West, right, acted as toastmaster for the event. Nashville Archives.
1959: JFK spoke at a sold out Democratic party banquet at the Maxwell House Hotel in downtown Nashville, TN, late winter. Mayor Ben West, right, acted as toastmaster for the event. Nashville Archives.
1959: U.S. Senator Al Gore, Sr.(D-TN), left, Nashville Mayor’s wife, Mrs. Ben West, sit with Senator John F. Kennedy at Democratic Party dinner. Nashville Archives.
1959: U.S. Senator Al Gore, Sr.(D-TN), left, Nashville Mayor’s wife, Mrs. Ben West, sit with Senator John F. Kennedy at Democratic Party dinner. Nashville Archives.
1959: Local dignitaries greet Senator John F. Kennedy at Tillamook Naval Air Station, Tillamook, Oregon.
1959: Local dignitaries greet Senator John F. Kennedy at Tillamook Naval Air Station, Tillamook, Oregon.
September 25, 1959: Cover of Dinner Program for the Democratic Party of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, featuring guest speaker, U.S. Senator John F. Kennedy.
September 25, 1959: Cover of Dinner Program for the Democratic Party of La Crosse County, Wisconsin, featuring guest speaker, U.S. Senator John F. Kennedy.
Nov 13, 1959: Senator John F. Kennedy addressing an audience at Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI.
Nov 13, 1959: Senator John F. Kennedy addressing an audience at Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI.
October 1959: JFK being interviewed by Rev. Rawley Meyers, a reporter for the “Southern Nebraska Register,” a Catholic newspaper in Lincoln, Nebraska.
October 1959: JFK being interviewed by Rev. Rawley Meyers, a reporter for the “Southern Nebraska Register,” a Catholic newspaper in Lincoln, Nebraska.
Oct 1959: JFK, who generally avoided donning gift hats of any kind, shown here in a “rice hat” awarded him at the Int’l Rice Festival in Crowley, LA. Edwin Edwards, later governor, shown at far right. Edmund Reggie archive.
Oct 1959: JFK, who generally avoided donning gift hats of any kind, shown here in a “rice hat” awarded him at the Int’l Rice Festival in Crowley, LA. Edwin Edwards, later governor, shown at far right. Edmund Reggie archive.
Historical marker in Crowley, LA, commemorating the date and location of JFK’s October 16th, 1960 speech before “an enthusiastic crown of thousands of Louisianans” at 23rd International Rice Festival.
Historical marker in Crowley, LA, commemorating the date and location of JFK’s October 16th, 1960 speech before “an enthusiastic crown of thousands of Louisianans” at 23rd International Rice Festival.
November 19, 1959: Former President Harry S. Truman greeting Senator John F. Kennedy at the Harry S. Truman Library in Independence, Missouri.
November 19, 1959: Former President Harry S. Truman greeting Senator John F. Kennedy at the Harry S. Truman Library in Independence, Missouri.
John F. Kennedy marker at Ohio University, Athens, Ohio, commemorating JFK’s visit there, September 18, 1959, quoting from his speech: "With a good conscience our only sure reward, with history the final judge of our deeds, let us go forth to lead the land we love..."
John F. Kennedy marker at Ohio University, Athens, Ohio, commemorating JFK’s visit there, September 18, 1959, quoting from his speech: "With a good conscience our only sure reward, with history the final judge of our deeds, let us go forth to lead the land we love..."
Dec 2, 1959: JFK before his address at Page Auditorium, Duke University. Kennedy is standing in the Music Room of the Flowers Building. Photo, Duke University.
Dec 2, 1959: JFK before his address at Page Auditorium, Duke University. Kennedy is standing in the Music Room of the Flowers Building. Photo, Duke University.
Headline from a Los Angeles Times newspaper story describing a speech Senator John F. Kennedy had given on November 1, 1959 at a Democratic dinner in L.A.
Headline from a Los Angeles Times newspaper story describing a speech Senator John F. Kennedy had given on November 1, 1959 at a Democratic dinner in L.A.
April 10, 1959: Senator John F. Kennedy photographed from balcony as he spoke to a capacity crowd in the Eaton Chapel of Beloit College, Beloit, WI.
April 10, 1959: Senator John F. Kennedy photographed from balcony as he spoke to a capacity crowd in the Eaton Chapel of Beloit College, Beloit, WI.
1959: JFK attends Harvard commencement as a member of Harvard’s Board of Overseers. He is talking with Harvard Treasurer, Paul C. Cabot (in top hat) and Sidney Weinberg, senior partner at Goldman Sachs, who received an honorary degree that day.
1959: JFK attends Harvard commencement as a member of Harvard’s Board of Overseers. He is talking with Harvard Treasurer, Paul C. Cabot (in top hat) and Sidney Weinberg, senior partner at Goldman Sachs, who received an honorary degree that day.
1959: JFK and Jackie in parade during campaign trip to Wheeling, West Virginia.  Photo, Mark Shaw.
1959: JFK and Jackie in parade during campaign trip to Wheeling, West Virginia. Photo, Mark Shaw.
1959: Jackie Kennedy saying a few words on campaign trail with JFK in West Virginia. Photo, Mark Shaw.
1959: Jackie Kennedy saying a few words on campaign trail with JFK in West Virginia. Photo, Mark Shaw.
Oct 31, 1959:  Cover of dinner program honoring Senator John F. Kennedy who would deliver a speech that evening before the sponsoring Democratic Committee of San Diego County, California.
Oct 31, 1959: Cover of dinner program honoring Senator John F. Kennedy who would deliver a speech that evening before the sponsoring Democratic Committee of San Diego County, California.
March 1959: JFK and Jackie being greeted by local delegation upon their arrival in Salt Lake City, Utah.
March 1959: JFK and Jackie being greeted by local delegation upon their arrival in Salt Lake City, Utah.
Sept 18, 1959: JFK in candid moment with Ohio University officials during his visit there.
Sept 18, 1959: JFK in candid moment with Ohio University officials during his visit there.
Feb 1959: JFK with Oak Ridge Nat’l Labs Director Alvin Weinberg, Sen. Al Gore Sr (D-TN), and wife Jacqueline Kennedy, Oak Ridge, TN.  DOE photo.
Feb 1959: JFK with Oak Ridge Nat’l Labs Director Alvin Weinberg, Sen. Al Gore Sr (D-TN), and wife Jacqueline Kennedy, Oak Ridge, TN. DOE photo.
Feb 1959: JFK, Jackie & Senator Gore being briefed by ORNL Director Alvin Weinberg (scene later made into mural, as shown below). DOE photo.
Feb 1959: JFK, Jackie & Senator Gore being briefed by ORNL Director Alvin Weinberg (scene later made into mural, as shown below). DOE photo.
Oak Ridge National Labs Visitor Center mural of February 1959 visit to ORNL by Sen. John F. Kennedy, his wife Jacqueline, and Sen. Al Gore, Sr., then being briefed by ORNL Director Alvin Weinberg.
Oak Ridge National Labs Visitor Center mural of February 1959 visit to ORNL by Sen. John F. Kennedy, his wife Jacqueline, and Sen. Al Gore, Sr., then being briefed by ORNL Director Alvin Weinberg.
1959: JFK talking with his sister, Patricia Kennedy Lawford and her husband, Peter Lawford, at unidentified restaurant.
1959: JFK talking with his sister, Patricia Kennedy Lawford and her husband, Peter Lawford, at unidentified restaurant.
Aug 21, 1959: JFK with family sailing off Hyannis, MA.
Aug 21, 1959: JFK with family sailing off Hyannis, MA.
August 21, 1959: Jackie, JFK, and family members returning to shore after sailing off Hyannis, MA.
August 21, 1959: Jackie, JFK, and family members returning to shore after sailing off Hyannis, MA.
1959: JFK, daughter Caroline, and Jackie near the shoreline at Hyannis Port, MA.  Photo, Mark Shaw.
1959: JFK, daughter Caroline, and Jackie near the shoreline at Hyannis Port, MA. Photo, Mark Shaw.
 

John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, JFKlibrary.org, Boston, MA

Kenneth P. O’Donnell and David F. Powers with Joe McCarthy, Johnny, We Hardly Knew Ye, Boston: Little Brown & Co., 1970.

Jacques Lowe, Portrait: The Emergence of John F. Kennedy, New York: Bramhall House / McGraw-Hill, 1961.

The New York Times, with photographs by Jacques Lowe, The Kennedy Years, New York: Viking Press, 1964.

The John F. Kennedy 1960 Campaign, Part II: Speeches, Press Conferences, and Debates ( Speech Files, 1953-1960). A Collection From the Holdings of The John F. Kennedy Library, Boston, MA, Edited by Paul L. Kesaris; Associate Editor, Robert E. Lester; Guide compiled by Douglas D. Newman (a microfilm project of University Publications of America, Inc., Frederick, MD, 1986).

“1960 Election Chronology,” David Pietrus-za.com.

Theodore H. White, The Making of the President 1960, New York: Atheneum Publishers, 1962.

David Pietrusza, 1960–LBJ vs. JFK vs. Nixon: The Epic Campaign That Forged Three Presidencies, New York: Union Square Press, 2008.

Daily JFK; The Life and Times of John F. Kennedy.

(Phila., PA, Jan. 31), “Kennedy Assails U. S. Leadership;  Contrasts ‘Timid’ Policies With Roosevelt’s ‘Tireless Energies’,” New York Times, February 1, 1959.

Austin C. Wehrwein (Milwaukee, April 9), “Kennedy Regards Religion as Issue; He Calls It Proper Political Topic — Opens 6-Speech Swing in Wisconsin,”New York Times, April 10, 1959.

Austin C. Wehrwein, “Kennedy Favors a New Approach; Touring Wisconsin, He Asks Democrats for Policies to Meet Current Challenges,”New York Times, April 11, 1959

Austin C. Wehrwein (Appleton, Wis., April 11), “Kennedy Appeals for Farmer Vote; Calls for More Cooperatives in Wisconsin Talk — Denies Softness on McCarthyism,” New York Times, April 12, 1959.

Austin C. Wehrwein (Indianapolis, April 12), “Kennedy Visions Wide Negro Role; Bids Race Here Train to Aid World Areas Having Vast Colored Populations,”New York Times, April 13, 1959.

Austin C. Wehrwein (Lafayette, Ind., April 13 ),”Kennedy Widens Atomic Lexicon; Coins Word ‘Fall-In’ to Put Stress on Hazards From Peaceful Nuclear Use”New York Times April 14, 1959

“2 Republican Senators Acclaim Kennedy Labor Bill as Big Gain,” New York Times, April 15, 1959.

“Methodist Bishops Talk with Kennedy,” New York Times, April 16, 1959.

Austin C. Wehrwein, “Democrats Head West in ’60 Race; Humphrey Opens 5-State Swing to Offset Gains of Kennedy in the Area,”New York Times, April 19, 1959.

Associated Press, “Editors View ’60: Nixon, Stevenson; Poll Gives Vice President Wide Edge but Foresees Tight Democratic Race” [Kennedy rated third among Democrats], New York Times, April 19, 1959.

James Reston, “Nixon Plans for 1960; He Will Start Presidential Bid in Fall And May Enter Some Primary Tests,”New York Times, April 24, 1959.

Gladwin Hill, “2 Senators Find Coast Cool on ’60; Humphrey, Kennedy Run Into Regional Sentiment Loyal to Stevenson,” New York Times, May 3, 1959.

Associated Press, “Kennedy Advocates Investment in India,” New York Times, May 3, 1959.

Stanley Levey, “Kennedy’s Views Praised by Meany; Labor Chief Tells Senator He Does Not Link Him to Revised Reform Bill,” New York Times, June 4, 1959.

“Program for U. S. Given by Kennedy; Senator Bids Nation Keep Pace With Change — He Talks at Nassau Fete,” New York Times, June 7, 1959.

Leo Egan, “Humphrey Urges a Fair Labor Bill; Suggests Kennedy Measure May Need Modification in Talk at Liberals’ Fete,” New York Times, June 11, 1959.

“Kennedy Seeking Maryland Votes; Senator and Tawes Confer on ’60 Delegates — Test in Primary Weighed,” New York Times, June 18, 1959.

Robert C. Albright, “Humphrey Permits Self To Be Entered in ’60 Race,” Washington Post / Times Herald, July 15, 1959, p. A-2.

Marquis Childs (Madison, WI), “Wisconsin Bracing For Bloody Battle,” Washington Post/Times Herald, July 21, 1959, p. A-14.

Edward T. Folliard, “Brown Unwilling To Take No. 2 Spot; Would Turn It Down; Qualifies Prediction,”Washington Post / Times Herald, July 31, 1959, p. B-8.

UPI (Milwaukee, July 31), “Warning by Kennedy; Peril Seen From Racketeers Posing as Businessmen,” New York Times, August 1, 1959.

Associated Press, (Portland, Ore, Aug. 1), “Kennedy Chides U. S. on Nuclear Policy,” New York Times, August 2, 1959.

W. H. Lawrence, “Kennedy Backers Press Governors; Seeking Delegate Support at Conference — Ribicoff Chides Favorite Sons,” New York Times, August 3, 1959.

“Nixon and Kennedy Top Wisconsin Poll,” New York Times, August 6, 1959.

Editorial, “In Search of A Candidate,” Chicago Sun-Times, August 15, 1959.

“Kennedy Going to Ohio” [in mid-September], New York Times, August 25, 1959.

“Kennedy Slates Riverside Talk on Western Trip,” Desert Sun (Palm Springs, Calif.), Ocotber 16, 1959.

“Sen. John Kennedy Will Visit Riverside on Nov. 1,” Daily News (Indio,Calif), October 19, 1959.

Robert Blanchard, “Slow Corrosion of Luxury Softens U. S., Kennedy Says; Spartanism Held Need in America,” Los Angles Times, November 3, 1959, p. 2.

Bill Becker (Los Angeles, November 2), “Kennedy Favors Atomic Test Ban; Backs Extended Suspension if Soviet Union Complies — Outlines 4-Point Plan,” New York Times, November 3, 1959.

Bill Becker (Los Angeles, Nov. 7), “Politicians Test Appeal on Coast; Kennedy, Rockefeller, et al., Pitch Eastern Charm at Aloof Westerners,” New York Times, November 8, 1959.

“Kennedy to See Truman” New York Times, November 8, 1959

(Denver, Nov. 30) “Kennedy Says Aid to Cities Is Vital; Senator Sees Top ’60 Issue as U.S. Help by Abating of Taxes or by Grants,” New York Times, December 1, 1959.

“TV Quiz Investigator Quits to Join Kennedy” [i.e., Richard Goodwin], Washington Post /Times Herald, December 10, 1959, p. A-2.

Earl Mazo, “Democrats Cautioned By Kennedy,” Washington Post / Times Herald, December 16, 1959,  p. A-10.

Raymond Lahr, “Kennedy to Announce Plans Jan. 2,” Washington Post / Times Herald, December 18, 1959, p. A-21.

Thomas Winship, “Kennedy Building Own ‘Braintrust’ Of University, Industrial Leaders,” Washington Post / Times Herald, December 26, 1959, p. A-2.

“Morse Says Kennedy Wooed Dixie on Labor,” Washington Post /Times Herald, December 30, 1959, p. B-1.

Frank Munger’s Atomic City Underground, “JFK’s 1959 Visit to ORNL,” KnoxNews .com, June 2, 2012.

“Photo Galleries Showcase John Kennedy’s Visits to Utah,” DeseretNews.com, Nov. 26, 2008.

David DeWitt, “Athens Lawyer Recalls John F. and Ted Kennedy’s Visit to Athens,” Athens News.com (Athens, Ohio), Monday, August 31,2009.

“JFK Visits Crowley Rice Festival, 1959,” EdmundReggie.com.

“JFK at Rice Festival, October 1959,” ReggieFamilyArchives.com.

“Video Vault: Looking Back at JFK Visits to Cleveland; Senator/President Made Many Visits to NE Ohio,” NewsNet5.com (Cleveland, Ohio), September 4, 2012.

Rodrique Ngowi, “John F. Kennedy Memorabilia Draws Hundreds To Massachusetts,” HuffingtonPost.com, Feb. 14, 2013.

“John F. Kennedy, Notable Visitors, 1950s,” University of Wisconsin-River Falls, River Falls, Wisconsin.

“Campaign Stops of Yesteryear,” The Observer, La Grande, OR, April 12, 2008.

Richard M. Rovere, illustrated by Robert Weaver, “Kennedy’s Last Chance To Be President; Competing Against a Mob of Candidates, Jack Must Go For Broke in 1960,” Esquire, April 1959.

Alden Whitman, “Robert Francis Kennedy: Attorney General, Senator and Heir of the New Frontier” (obituary), New York Times, June 6, 1968.

Gene Barnes, “Senator John F. Kennedy, 1959,” I, Witness.

Maryalys Urey, “JFK’s Visit to Baker,” Baker City Herald, February 19, 2007.

Omaha Steve, “Kennedy Memories Haven’t Dimmed (JFK’s Nebraska-Born Speech- writer),” Democratic Underground .com,  June 22, 2008.

Liesl Schillinger, “JFK in Springfield, Illinois, 1959 & 1960 (thoughts on JFK on 50th anniversary of his election),” Tumbler .com, November 8, 2010.

“1959 Photo: Then-Senator John F. Kennedy Speaks at Royce Hall,” UCLA Faculty Association, November 23, 2012.

 

JFK Speeches & Remarks: 1959

Address of Senator Kennedy, Chamber of Commerce Dinner, Charlotte, North Carolina, “Labor Racketeering,” January 15, 1959, 43pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Roosevelt Day Dinner, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, “Liberalism,” January 31,1959, 34pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, National Rural Electrification Cooperative Association, Washington, D.C., “Power Policy,” February 11, 1959, 6pp.

Remarks in the United States Senate by Senator Kennedy, “The Economic Gap,” February 19, 1959, 5pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Tennessee Rotary Club, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, “Nuclear Weapons,” February 24, 1959, 8pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Democratic Dinner, Nashville, Tennessee, “The Democratic Party,” February 24, 1959, 35pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Joint Session of the Tennessee Legislature, Nashville, Tennessee, “Leadership,” February 25, 1959, 13pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, AFL-CIO Building  & Construction Trades Dept., National Legislative Conference, Wash., D.C., “Labor Legislation,” March 2, 1959, 27pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Roosevelt Day Dinner, Medford, Oregon, “Water Resource Development,” March 6, 1959, 2pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Roosevelt Day Dinner, Salt Lake City, Utah, “The Democratic Party,” March 6, 1959, 23pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Jefferson-Jackson Day Dinner, Boise, Idaho, “Water Resource Development; The Democratic Party,” March 7, 1959, 27pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Jefferson-Jackson Day Dinner, Butte, Montana, “Unemployment Compensation,” March 8, 1959, 4pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Montana Legislature, Helena, Montana, “Leadership,” March 8, 1959, 19pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Friendly Sons of St. Patrick’s Dinner, Providence, Rhode Island, “Irish History,” March 17, 1959, 23pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, North Carolina Democratic Club Annual Dinner, Washington, D.C., “National Security,” March 21, 1959, 32pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, National Federation of Grain Cooperatives Annual Spring Conference, Washington, D.C., “Federal Farm Policy,” March 25, 1959, 22pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Milwaukee Gridiron Dinner, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, “Free Press,” April 9, 1959, 18pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, United Negro College Fund Convocation, Indianapolis, Indiana, “American Education,” April 12, 1959, 20pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Meeting Opening National Library Week, Indianapolis, Indiana, “The Public Library,” April 13, 1959, 4pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, National Civil Liberties Clearing House Annual Conference, Washington, D.C., “Civil Liberties,” April 16, 1959, 19pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Cleveland Press Book and Author Luncheon, Cleveland, Ohio, “The Public Library,” April 16, 1959, 25pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy before the American Women in Radio and TV, New York, New York, “Women in Professions; Labor Racketeering,” April 30, 1959, 51pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy before the California Legislature, Sacramento, CA, “Leadership,” May 1, 1959, 13pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Press Club of Greater Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, “Labor Racketeering,” May 1,1959, 29pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Committee for International Economic Growth Conference on India and the United States, Washington, D.C., “The Bases of U.S. Interest in India-Its New Dimensions,” May 4, 1959, 43pp.

Introduction by Senator Kennedy of Lyndon B. Johnson, Truman Dinner, Boston, Massachusetts. May 8, 1959, 8pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Fund-Raising Dinner, Welch, West Virginia, “Depressed Areas Legislation; Coal,” May 9, 1959, 25pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, International Ladies Garment Workers Union Annual Convention, Miami Beach, Florida, “Labor Racketeering,” May 15,1959, 39pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Grover Cleveland Dinner, Buffalo, New York. “Labor Racketeering; The Democratic Party,” May 21, 1959, 14pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Jefferson-Jackson Day Dinner, Detroit, Michigan, “Ten Revolutions of Our Time,” May 23,1959, 33pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Chicago Daily News Youth Achievement Awards Program, Chicago, Illinois, “Careers in Politics,” May 24, 1959, 9pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, United Hatters, Cap and Millinery Workers Convention, New York, New York, “Labor Racketeering; Immigration,” June 3, 1959, 41 pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Democratic Dinner, Garden City, New York, “The Democratic Party,” June 6, 1959, 27pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Chevy Chase High School, Bethesda, Maryland, “Careers in Politics,” June 15, 1959, 17pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy Before the League of Municipalities, Ocean City, Maryland, “Urban Problems,” June 16, 1959, 25pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Fraternal Order of Eagles Convention, Seattle, WA, “Unemployment Compensation; Social Security,” June 20, 1959, 16pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Democratic Dinner, Seattle, Washington, “The Democratic Party,” June 20, 1959, 28pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Democratic Dinner, Yakima, Washington, “The Democratic Party; Water Resource Development,” June 21, 1959, 29pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Jefferson-Jackson Day Dinner, Bellaire, Ohio, “The Democratic Party,” June 27,1959, 26pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, American Society of African Culture Annual Conference, New York, New York, “Africa,” June 28, 1959, 44pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Hawaii Tour, Hawaii, “The U.S. and Hawaii and Our Future in Asia; The Democratic Party,” July 3-July 5, 1959, 39pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Essex County Democratic Governor’s Day Annual Picnic, Spring Lake, New Jersey, “Urban Overpopulation,” July 13, 1959, 8pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, District Attorneys’ Convention, Milwaukee, WI, “Labor and Business Racketeering,” July 31, 1959, 9pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Dave Epps Memorial Dinner, Portland, Oregon, “Geneva Conference on Atomic Testing and Surprise Attack,” August 1, 1959, 21 pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, AFL-CIO Convention, Seaside, OR, “Labor Racketeer-ing; Unemployment Compensation; Care of the Aged,” August 3,1959, 11 pp.

Remarks in the United States Senate by Senator Kennedy, “The Power of Labor for the Good of America,” September 10,1959, 5pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, AFL-CIO Convention of Building Trades, San Francisco, California, “Labor Legislation,” September 11, 1959, 111pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Montgomery County Bar Association Dinner, Dayton, Ohio, “Labor Racketeering; The Steel Strike and the Taft-Hartley Law,” September 17,1959, 27pp.

Speech Introductions by Senator Kennedy, Democratic Dinner, Athens, Ohio; Lucas County Democratic Picnic, Toledo, Ohio, September 18, 1959-September 19, 1959, 3pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Temple B’rith Kodesh Temple Club, Rochester, New York, “Israel–A Land of Paradoxes,” October 1, 1959, 9pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Mayor Charles Boswell Dinner, Indianapolis, Indiana. “National Security,” October 2, 1959, 6pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Washington County Democratic Dinner, Fayette City, Pennsylvania, “The Steel Strike and the Taft-Hartley Law,” October 9, 1959, 6pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, UAW Convention, Atlantic City, New Jersey, “Economic Development,” October 12, 1959, 5pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, AFL-CIO State Convention, Lincoln, Nebraska, “Labor Racketeering,” October 13, 1959, 16pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy before the Radio and Television News Directors Association, New Orleans, Louisiana, The Role of the Media,” October 15, 1959, 7pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Pulaski Day, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, “U.S. Policy Toward Poland and Other Captive Nations,” October 17, 1959, 11 pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Portland Realty Board Luncheon, Portland, Oregon, “The Future of Housing and Real Estate,” October 21, 1959, 8pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, AI Smith Dinner, New York, New York, “A Tribute to AI Smith,” October 22, 1959, 16pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Midwest Farm Conference, Springfield, Illinois, “Federal Farm Policy,” October 24, 1959, 7pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Mills College, Oakland, California, “Mills College and the Loyalty Oath,” October 30, 1959, 5pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, UCLA Student Convocation, Los Angeles, California, “The Control of Nuclear Weapons,” November 2, 1959, 5pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Jefferson-Jackson Day Dinner, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, “The Future of America; Depletion Tax Allowances,” November 14,1959, 11pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Democratic Party of Wisconsin Annual Convention, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. “U.S.-Soviet Competition,” November 14, 1959, 10pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Maine Democratic Party Issues Conference Banquet, Augusta, Maine. “Electrical Energy in Maine,” November 15, 1959, 4pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy before the National Milk Producers Federation, Washington, D.C., “Federal Farm Policy; The Dairy Farmer: The Challenge Ahead,” November 16,1959, 27pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Democratic Luncheon, Kansas City, Kansas, “U.S.-Soviet Competition,” November 19, 1959, 27pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Democratic Dinner, Wichita, Kansas, “The 1960 Election-and 1968,” November 19, 1959, 5pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Democratic Reception, Dodge City, Kansas, “Federal Farm Policy,” November 20, 1959, 7pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Democratic Dinner, Denver, Colorado. “U.S.-Soviet Competition; Water and Power Development Memorandum,” November 28, 1959, 13pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Democratic Reception, Boulder, Colorado, “Loyalty Oath,” November 28, 1959, 5pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Democratic Reception, Pueblo, Colorado, “Labor Legislation,” November 29, 1959, 16pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Democratic Dinner, Grand Junction, Colorado, “Water Resource Development,” November 30, 1959, 23pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy before the American Municipal Association, Denver, Colorado, “Urban Problems,” November 30, 1959, 6pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy before the Allegheny County Bar Association, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, “Administrative Justice and Delay,” December 10, 1959, 9pp.

 ______________________________________




“JFK’s Early Campaign”
1958

March 1958: Senator John F. Kennedy and wife, Jacqueline, campaigning for his Senate re-election in Boston’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade. He won his Senate race with more than 73% of the vote, boosting his presidential profile for 1960.
March 1958: Senator John F. Kennedy and wife, Jacqueline, campaigning for his Senate re-election in Boston’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade. He won his Senate race with more than 73% of the vote, boosting his presidential profile for 1960.
     In 1958, the second year of Senator John F. Kennedy’s “unofficial” campaign for his party’s presidential nomination, the junior senator from Massachusetts also faced a re-election campaign at home for his U.S. Senate seat.  But Kennedy’s Senate race in Massachusetts also figured into his presidential calculus, as he set out to win re-election by a wide margin, believing this would improve his visibility in the party and nationally.  Kennedy figured correctly, as he did receive increased attention after winning 73.6 percent of votes cast in that race, the largest popular margin ever received by a candidate in the state.  A poll of Democratic chairmen in Massachusetts not long after the election put Kennedy at the top of their list for the 1960 presidential nomination.

So, even with his Senate re-election campaign, JFK was eyeing the bigger prize.  And throughout 1958, in addition to campaigning in Massachusetts, he also traveled extensively across the U.S., meeting with party officials, the media, and giving speeches.  It was all part of his presidential and Democratic Party ground game.

Feb 24, 1958: JFK at the Sunday Evening Forum in Tucson, Arizona where he was asked if a man his age could be president. Kennedy, 42 at the time, responded: "I don't know about a 42-year-old man, but I think a 43-year-old man can." Photo, Tucson Citizen.
Feb 24, 1958: JFK at the Sunday Evening Forum in Tucson, Arizona where he was asked if a man his age could be president. Kennedy, 42 at the time, responded: "I don't know about a 42-year-old man, but I think a 43-year-old man can." Photo, Tucson Citizen.
     His speeches and appearances ranged from his denunciation of “venal and irresponsible” labor lawyers in a Fordham Law School speech in February 1958 – then referring to lawyers he had observed during his time on the Senate Rackets Committee – to an appearance and speech at the Annual National Corn Picking Contest in Cedar Rapids, Iowa in October 1958 where he spoke about federal farm policy.  During 1958, a few notable Democrats were beginning to endorse JFK for the 1960 presidential nomination – not least of whom was Gov. Abraham A. Ribicoff of Connecticut, who announced in mid-May 1958 at the Governors Conference in Miami his backing of Kennedy for president.  In June, Kennedy was on the cover of Newsweek, offered as a contender.  In July, Cabell Phillips of the New York Times, wrote that Senator John F. Kennedy – “the handsome, well-endowed young author-statesman from Massachusetts” – was the man “many Democrats regard as their surest bet in the campaign to ‘Stop Nixon in ’60’.”  By late September that year, a gathering at the Southern Governors Conference also indicated that Kennedy appeared to be the favorite Democratic presidential candidate.

Nov. 1958: JFK posing for portrait photo at the home of Peter and Patricia Lawford, Santa Monica, CA. Los Angeles Times photographer William S. Murphy took the photo for a story on JFK that appeared the next day.
Nov. 1958: JFK posing for portrait photo at the home of Peter and Patricia Lawford, Santa Monica, CA. Los Angeles Times photographer William S. Murphy took the photo for a story on JFK that appeared the next day.
     In 1958, Kennedy was also stumping for his party, boosting Democratic candidates across the U.S. for the mid-term elections that year.  On one trip he made into West Virginia to support local candidates, New York Times reporter James Reston, then traveling with Kennedy, noted that JFK was “quietly but diligently building support these days for the 1960 Democratic Presidential nomination.”  Kennedy was in the state, Reston reported, “helping the West Virginia Democrats’ candidates in the hope that they will in turn help him two years from now.”  Nor was this a “new adventure” for the senator, as Reston explained: “Ever since his strong bid for the Democratic Vice Presidential nomination in 1956, he has been methodically going from one state to another, meeting party leaders, speaking at party rallies and getting himself known.”

     Kennedy also made a trip to Alaska on November 11th and 12th, 1958, then helping to boost Democratic candidates there for a special November 25th election, as Alaska was becoming a new state.  Following his Alaska visit, Kennedy headed south to California for a brief rest and visit at his sister and brother-in-law’s home – Patricia and Peter Lawford – in Santa Monica.  Kennedy was also there to serve as godfather at the baptism of the Lawford’s third child, Victoria.  While at the Lawfords, Kennedy did an interview with a Los Angeles Times reporter on November 13th.  It was the week following the 1958 mid-term elections, and Kennedy spoke about the election and the Democrats.  During th einterview, he was also asked about his candidacy for president in 1960, to which he replied: “It’s too early.  The wheels spin around pretty fast.  A year from now I’ll have an answer to that one.  All I want to do now is thaw out.  It was 4 below when I left Fairbanks Wednesday morning.”

1958: JFK & Jackie riding in car during campaign event & parade in Boston. Photo, Carl Mydans.
1958: JFK & Jackie riding in car during campaign event & parade in Boston. Photo, Carl Mydans.
     What follows below is an abbreviated listing of some of JFK’s travel and speaking itinerary for the year 1958, highlighted with a few photographs and a couple of magazine covers also from that year.  A number of his speeches from 1958 are also listed below in “Sources, Links & Additional Information” at the bottom of this article.  See also at this website, “JFK Early Campaign, 1957” and “The Jack Pack, 1958-1960.”  Additional stories on JFK’s road to the White House in 1960 will be posted in future weeks.  Thanks for visiting – and please consider supporting this website.  Thank you.
 —  Jack Doyle


 

JFK Campaigning
Speeches, Dinners, Media, Democratic Party Activity, Etc,.
January-December 1958

 

1958: JFK campaigning in Massachusetts for re-election, with campaign aide handing out bumper stickers.
1958: JFK campaigning in Massachusetts for re-election, with campaign aide handing out bumper stickers.
Feb. 1958, NY: Laurence J. McGinley, president of Fordham University, presents Senator Kennedy with honorary degree at  Fordham Law Association luncheon.
Feb. 1958, NY: Laurence J. McGinley, president of Fordham University, presents Senator Kennedy with honorary degree at Fordham Law Association luncheon.
1958: Sen. Kennedy shaking hands with Massachusetts shipyard workers during his re-election campaign.
1958: Sen. Kennedy shaking hands with Massachusetts shipyard workers during his re-election campaign.
June 1958: Newsweek magazine put JFK on the cover of its June 23rd issue with taglines: “Jack Kennedy - Shadows of ’60" / “Out in Front? Out on a Limb?”
June 1958: Newsweek magazine put JFK on the cover of its June 23rd issue with taglines: “Jack Kennedy - Shadows of ’60" / “Out in Front? Out on a Limb?”
1958: Senator Kennedy visiting with former president Herbert Hoover in Washington, D.C.
1958: Senator Kennedy visiting with former president Herbert Hoover in Washington, D.C.
1958: Senator John F. Kennedy in New Bedford, MA during his 1958 senate re-election campaign.
1958: Senator John F. Kennedy in New Bedford, MA during his 1958 senate re-election campaign.
Nov. 24th, 1958, Time magazine, featuring seven "Democratic Hopefuls" in the early bidding for the 1960 presidential nomination: at top, Adlai Stevenson, former Illinois Governor and Democratic Presidential candidate (1952 and 1956); standing from left: Sen. Hubert H. Humphrey (MN), Sen. Stuart Symington (MO), Sen. Lyndon B. Johnson (TX); and seated, from left, New Jersey Gov. Robert Meyner, Sen. John F. Kennedy (MA) and then California Gov.-elect, Edmund "Pat" Brown.
Nov. 24th, 1958, Time magazine, featuring seven "Democratic Hopefuls" in the early bidding for the 1960 presidential nomination: at top, Adlai Stevenson, former Illinois Governor and Democratic Presidential candidate (1952 and 1956); standing from left: Sen. Hubert H. Humphrey (MN), Sen. Stuart Symington (MO), Sen. Lyndon B. Johnson (TX); and seated, from left, New Jersey Gov. Robert Meyner, Sen. John F. Kennedy (MA) and then California Gov.-elect, Edmund "Pat" Brown.
 
 
 

Jan-Feb 1958

Jan 12: Boston, MA, Knights of Columbus
Jan 16: NY, NY, Boy Scouts of America
Jan 20: Richmond, VA, Women’s Club
Feb 4: Latrobe, PA, St. Vincents College
Feb 7: Lynn, MA, Hotel Edison Spch
Feb 8: Maiden, MA, Torbert MacDonald
Feb 9: NY, NY, B’nai Zion Banquet
Feb 11: Philadelphia, PA, La Salle College
Feb 13: Wash., DC, John Carroll Society
Feb 15: NY, NY, Fordham Law Alumni
Feb 18: Baltimore, MD, Loyola College
Feb 20: Cleveland, OH, Book & Authors
Feb 22: Tucson, AZ, Democratic Dinner
Feb 23: Tucson, AZ, Democratic Forum
Feb 24: Denver, CO, Denver University
Feb 26: Wash., DC, Conf on Int’l Aid
Feb 27: Baltimore, MD, U.N. Assoc.

 

March 1958

Mar 1: Los Angeles, CA, FDR Dinner
Mar 2: Chicago, IL, Polish Daily News
Mar 6: Baltimore, MD, WBC Conf.
Mar 7: Bristol, VA, Jeff-Jack Dinner
Mar 8: Charlottesville, VA, Univ of VA
Mar 10: Boston, Harvard Bd of Overseers
Mar 12: Wash., DC, AFL-CIO Conference
Mar 13: Wash., DC, Women’s Dem Club
Mar 13: ABC-TV, Navy Log: PT 109
Mar 15: Wash., DC, Gridiron Club Dinner
Mar 16: Boston Univ /Newman Breakfast
Mar 16: Holyoke, MA, Holyoke Parade
Mar 16: Maiden, MA, John Volpe Co.
Mar 16: Everett, MA, Sons of St. Patrick
Mar 17: Boston, St. Patrick’s Day Parade
Mar 17: Lawrence, MA, St. Patrick’s Dance
Mar 19: Wash., DC, YMCA Dinner Spch
Mar 21: Boston, MA, Harvard Club Spch
Mar 22: Des Moines, IA, Jeff-Jack Dinner
Mar 23: Roxbury, MA, Freedom House
Mar 25: U.S. Senate, Development in India
Mar 29: Indianapolis, IN, Jeff-Jack Dinner
Mar 30: Boston, MA, Greek Celebration

 

April 1958

Apr 11: Bismark, ND, Jeff-Jack Dinner
Apr 12: Huron, SD, Jeff-Jack Dinner
Apr 12: Dickinson, ND, T. Roosevelt Lect.
Apr 14: Concord, MA, Rotary Dinner
Apr 16: Jackson, MS, Econ Council Dinner
Apr 18: Pittsburgh, PA, World Affairs Frm
Apr 19: Boston, Sign magazine interview
Apr 19: Boston, Jefferson-Jackson Dinner
Apr 20: Mattappan, MA, Easter Banquet
Apr 21: Wash., DC, Better Schools Cncl
Apr 25: Minneapolis, MN, Hist Assoc Mtg
Apr 26: Minneapolis, Univ. of Minnesota
Apr 27: Eugene, OR, FDR Mem. Dinner
Apr 28: Portland, OR, Portland St. College
Apr 29: Wash., DC, Retail Workers
Apr 30: Wash., DC, Rockefeller Awards

 

May 1958

May 1: Haverhill, MA, Chamb of Commerce
May 3: W. Springfield, MA, Industry Spch
May 3: Wallingford, CT, Choate Alum Day
May 4: Fall River, MA, Daugthers of Isabella
May 8: Senate spch, “Unemployment…”
May 10: Fitchburgh, MA, JFK spch read
May 11: Wash., DC, “The State of Israel”
May 12: Boston, Harvard Bd of Overseers
May 13:Wilkes-Barre, PA, Chamb of Com.
May 14: Atlantic City, NJ, Clothing Workers
May 14: Boston, “The Diocese of Boston”
May 15: Lawrence, MA, “Unemployment”
May 15: Chestnut Hill, MA, Boston College
May 16: Madison, WI, Univ. of Wisconsin
May 17: Milwaukee, WI, Jeff-Jack Dinner
May 18: Eugene, OR, Jeff-Jack Day Dinner
May 19: Gov. Ribbicoff (CT), Endorses JFK
May 30: Dorchester, MA, Memorial Day
May 31: New Hampshire, Jeff-Jack Dinner

 

June-July-August 1958

Jun 1: Boston, State of Israel Celebration
Jun 2: Wash., DC, Trinity College
Jun 4: Wash., DC, Freedman Hospital
Jun 7: Boston, N.E. College of Pharmacy
Jun 7: Manchester, NH, “Democratic Party”
Jun 8: Northampton, MA, Smith College
Jun 9: Quincy, IL, Quincy College
Jun 11: Morgantown, WV Jeff-Jack Dinner
Jun 14: Casper, WY, Democratic Dinner
Jun 15: Billings, MT, Democratic Dinner
Jun 20: Salem, MA, Homecoming/Salem
Jun 23:White Sulph Sprgs, Tobacco Assoc.
Jun 27: Harford, CT, State Dems Conv’tn
Aug 14: Senate Remarks, “Military Gap”
Aug 20: Boston, Am. Hellenic Educators

 

September 1958

Sep 10: Atlantic City, NJ, Bakery Workers
Sep 11: Miami Beach, U.S. Mayors Conf.
Sep 18: Atlantic City, NJ, Steelworkers
Sep 24: Gloucester, MA, Senate Campaign
Sep 24: Danvers, MA, Hunt Mem Hospital
Sep 24: Swampscott, MA, Lady Elks Spch
Sep 25: Newburyport, MA, Mtg w Reporters
Sep 25: Andover, MA, Tyre Rubber Co.
Sep 26: Burlington, VT, Rural Co-ops
Sep 27: Greenfield, MA, Greenfield H.S.
Sep 27: Northhampton, MA, City Hall
Sep 28: Pittsfield / North Adams, MA
Sep 28: Holyoke, MA, War Mem Bldg
Sep 29: Springfield, MA, Milton Bradley Co
Sep 29: Westfield, MA, H.B. Smith Co.
Sep 29: Agawan, MA, Shopping Center
Sep 29: W. Springfield, Pub Square Mtg
Sep 29: Chicopee, MA, United Fund Dinner

 

Oct-Nov-Dec 1958

Oct 2: Worcester, MA, Assumption College
Oct 3: Boston, Massachusetts Realtors
Oct 4: Concord, NH, Ed for Pub Service
Oct 8: Dover, DE, Rally at State Capitol
Oct 10: Parkersburg, WV, for Mid-Terms
Oct 17: Cedar Rapids, IA, “Farm Policy”
Oct 21: WHYN-TV, Sen. Kennedy Story
Oct 24: Frank Sinatra endorses JFK
Oct 25: Boston, Samuel Gompers Mem.
Nov 5: JFK re-elected U.S. Senator
Nov 10: Juneau, AK, Alaska Dem Party
Nov 11: Alaska Tour / Democratic Party
Nov 12: Fairbanks, AK
Nov 13: Santa Monica, CA, R&R
Nov 14: Los Angeles Times story/profile
Nov 15: Puerto Rico, Democratic Dinner
Dec 16: St. Thomas, V.I., Dem. Party
Dec 19: Lou Harris hired as JFK pollster

_______________________________

Note:  The above listing of Sen. Kennedy’s travels and speeches in 1958 may not include all of his activities during that year, especially in Massa- chusetts where he had many multiple-town stops during his Senate re-election campaign. The full titles of a number of his major speeches are included below, in the second half of “Sources.” More photos also follow below.

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Date Posted: 21 August 2013
Last Update: 21 August 2013
Comments to: jdoyle@pophistorydig.com

Article Citation:
Jack Doyle, “JFK’s Early Campaign: 1958,”
PopHistoryDig.com, August 21, 2013.

________________________________



Sources, Links & Additional Information

October 2, 1958: Senator John F. Kennedy speaking at Assumption College, Worcester, MA.
October 2, 1958: Senator John F. Kennedy speaking at Assumption College, Worcester, MA.
October 2, 1958: Senator  Kennedy unveiling a portrait of his brother at dedication of Lt. Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr. Memorial Science Hall, Assumption College.
October 2, 1958: Senator Kennedy unveiling a portrait of his brother at dedication of Lt. Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr. Memorial Science Hall, Assumption College.
March 15, 1958: Kennedy brothers, from left, Teddy, Jack and Bobby, at Gridiron Club in Washington, DC, where JFK delivered a speech.
March 15, 1958: Kennedy brothers, from left, Teddy, Jack and Bobby, at Gridiron Club in Washington, DC, where JFK delivered a speech.
March 1958: Jacqueline Kennedy and JFK during a reception at the University of Southern California.
March 1958: Jacqueline Kennedy and JFK during a reception at the University of Southern California.
March 1958: Senator Kennedy holding baby daughter, Caroline, with Jackie at his side, photographed in their Georgetown /Wash., DC home by Life magazine photo-grapher Ed Clark for magazine issue below.
March 1958: Senator Kennedy holding baby daughter, Caroline, with Jackie at his side, photographed in their Georgetown /Wash., DC home by Life magazine photo-grapher Ed Clark for magazine issue below.
The April 21st1958 edition of Life magazine featured the young Kennedy family on its cover, with the tagline, “Jacqueline, Caroline and Jack Kennedy.”
The April 21st1958 edition of Life magazine featured the young Kennedy family on its cover, with the tagline, “Jacqueline, Caroline and Jack Kennedy.”
June 2, 1958, Wash., DC: JFK at Trinity College greeting graduate Barbara Bailey and her father, John Bailey, who became a key operative & strategist in JFK’s 1960 victory. Barbara Bailey Kennelly later won a seat in the U.S. Congress (D-CT) and also ran for governor.
June 2, 1958, Wash., DC: JFK at Trinity College greeting graduate Barbara Bailey and her father, John Bailey, who became a key operative & strategist in JFK’s 1960 victory. Barbara Bailey Kennelly later won a seat in the U.S. Congress (D-CT) and also ran for governor.
1958: Senator John F. Kennedy & Jackie greeting Boston police officer on Chelsea Street in south Boston.
1958: Senator John F. Kennedy & Jackie greeting Boston police officer on Chelsea Street in south Boston.
Feb 11, 1958: Sen. Kennedy with La Salle College officials in Phila., PA, where he received an honorary degree and delivered a speech, “Careers in Politics.”
Feb 11, 1958: Sen. Kennedy with La Salle College officials in Phila., PA, where he received an honorary degree and delivered a speech, “Careers in Politics.”
March 1958: Jacqueline Kennedy with the three Kennedy brothers at University of Virginia in Charlottesville, VA,  where Teddy (left) was then a student, Bobby (right)  a law school graduate, and JFK (center), there to give a speech at the Law School’s first Law Day.
March 1958: Jacqueline Kennedy with the three Kennedy brothers at University of Virginia in Charlottesville, VA, where Teddy (left) was then a student, Bobby (right) a law school graduate, and JFK (center), there to give a speech at the Law School’s first Law Day.
October 26th, 1958: Senator Kennedy campaigning for re-election and visiting with textile workers at the Charlton Woolen Co. plant in Charlton, MA.
October 26th, 1958: Senator Kennedy campaigning for re-election and visiting with textile workers at the Charlton Woolen Co. plant in Charlton, MA.
Cover of “A Nation of Immigrants,” a book begun by JFK in 1958 when he was a U.S. Senator and published after his death in 1964.
Cover of “A Nation of Immigrants,” a book begun by JFK in 1958 when he was a U.S. Senator and published after his death in 1964.
Martin Sandler’s 2013 compilation of JFK’s letters range from those sent to Martin Luther King and Clare Booth Luce, to John Wayne and Nikita Khrushchev, among others.
Martin Sandler’s 2013 compilation of JFK’s letters range from those sent to Martin Luther King and Clare Booth Luce, to John Wayne and Nikita Khrushchev, among others.
Maureen Harris and Steve Gilbert have complied 30 of JFK’s speeches in their 2013 “Word For Word” book.
Maureen Harris and Steve Gilbert have complied 30 of JFK’s speeches in their 2013 “Word For Word” book.
Edward Claflin’s 1991 book, “JFK Wants to Know: Memos From the President's Office, 1961-1963,” includes a preface by JFK insider, Pierre Salinger.
Edward Claflin’s 1991 book, “JFK Wants to Know: Memos From the President's Office, 1961-1963,” includes a preface by JFK insider, Pierre Salinger.
An October 2013 New York Times book, “The Kennedy Years,” includes NYT news stories and columns of that era, special essays, and some 125 photos.
An October 2013 New York Times book, “The Kennedy Years,” includes NYT news stories and columns of that era, special essays, and some 125 photos.
John Newman’s 1992 book, “JFK and Vietnam.”
John Newman’s 1992 book, “JFK and Vietnam.”
Cover photo from John Logsdon’s 2010 book, “John F. Kennedy and The Race to the Moon.”
Cover photo from John Logsdon’s 2010 book, “John F. Kennedy and The Race to the Moon.”
Jeff Greenfield’s October 2013 book, “If Kennedy Lived,” poses a “what if” historical scenario.
Jeff Greenfield’s October 2013 book, “If Kennedy Lived,” poses a “what if” historical scenario.
 

John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, JFKlibrary.org, Boston, MA.

Kenneth P. O’Donnell and David F. Powers with Joe McCarthy, Johnny, We Hardly Knew Ye, Boston: Little Brown & Co., 1970.

Jacques Lowe, Portrait: The Emergence of John F. Kennedy, New York: Bramhall House/McGraw-Hill, 1961.

The New York Times, with photographs by Jacques Lowe, The Kennedy Years, New York: Viking Press, 1964.

The John F. Kennedy 1960 Campaign, Part II: Speeches, Press Conferences & Debates (Speech Files, 1953-1960). A Collection From the Holdings of The John F. Kennedy Library, Boston, MA, Edited by Paul L. Kesaris; Associate Editor, Robert E. Lester; Guide compiled by Douglas D. Newman (a microfilm project of University Publications of America, Inc., Frederick, MD, 1986).

“1960 Election Chronology,” David Pietru- sza .com.

Theodore H. White, The Making of the President 1960, New York: Atheneum Publishers, 1962.

David Pietrusza, 1960–LBJ vs. JFK vs. Nixon: The Epic Campaign That Forged Three Presidencies, New York: Union Square Press, 2008.

Daily JFK; The Life and Times of John F. Kennedy.

“Kennedy Lists Dangers; Fears Soviet Gains in Fields Other Than Missiles,” New York Times, January 21, 1958.

“Wider Coverage Asked; Kennedy to Seek Action on Minimum Wage Bill,” New York Times, January 26, 1958.

“Senator Kennedy Hits ‘Venal’ Lawyers Of Labor Field in a Speech at Fordham,” New York Times, February 16, 1958.

“Kennedy Denies Charge; Not Silent on McCarthy, He Replies to Mrs. Roosevelt,” New York Times, March 31, 1958.

A. H. Raskin, “Meany Gives Way on Racket Curbs; He and Kennedy, Dropping Dispute on Issue, Promise Laws Labor Can Accept,” New York Times, May 15, 1958

Richard J. H. Johnston, “Kennedy Decries Lack of Leaders; In Milwaukee, Senator Says U. S. Faces Great Crisis in Dealings With Allies” New York Times, May 18, 1958

“Ribicoff Gives Backing To Kennedy for 1960,” New York Times, Review of the Week, May 19, 1958.

Associated Press, “Kennedy Bill on Labor Gains; Senators Stiffen Three Curbs,”New York Times, June 4, 1958.

“Hope [i.e. Bob Hope, actor] and Kennedy Honored” [at Quincy College], New York Times, June 9, 1958.

Cabell Phillips, “How to Be a Presidential Candidate,” New York Times, July 13, 1958.

“Kennedy Speech Brings Threat Of Star Session; Uproar Marks Senate In Kennedy Speech Fight,” Washington Post/Times Herald, August 15, 1958, p. A-1.

C.R. Owens (Boston Globe), “Kennedy, With Eye on White House, Wages Vigorous Senate Campaign,” Washington Post/Times Herald, August 18, 1958, p. A-11.

James Reston, “Kennedy Looks to 1960; Quietly but Diligently, the Senator Seeks Backing for Presidential Bid,” New York Times, October 10, 1958.

Roscoe Drummond, “Can Kennedy Do It?,” Washington Post/Times Herald, October 15, 1958, p. A-15.

News story, Holyoke Daily Transcript and Telegram (MA), Wednesday, October 22, 1958, mentioning TV film, “U.S. Senator John F. Kennedy Story,” broadcast on WHYN-TV, Channel 40.

John H. Fenton, “Democrats Gain in New England; New Hampshire Only State Giving G.O.P. a Sweep — Kennedy’s Stature Up,” New York Times, November 6, 1958.

“Kennedy Going to Alaska,” New York Times, November 7, 1958.

Allen Drury, “Bolt by South Doubted; Kennedy Rejects Moves Now for ’60,” New York Times, November 10, 1958.

“Kennedy Leading ’60 Poll of Party; Symington Rated Second, Meyner Third in View of State Chairmen,” New York Times, November 16, 1958.

Kathleen Tracy, “Jacqueline Kennedy: A Political Asset,” NetPlaces.com.

“The Day JFK Visited DSU,” Dickinson State.edu.

“Senator John F. Kennedy, Alaskan Tour Papers, 1958,” Alaska State Library, Historical Collections. In November 1958, the Democratic Party held a speaking tour in Juneau, Anchorage, and Fairbanks to promote its candidates for Alaskan offices. The keynote speaker of this tour was John F. Kennedy, accompanied by former Governor Ernest Gruening of Alaska, E.L. Bartlett, and Governor William Egan.

“Connecticut’s Contribution to JFK’s 1960 Victory,” PaulDeAngelisBooks.com, Jan. 2, 2011.

“Archive Photos: Kennedy and Johnson in Tucson,”AzStarNet.com, July 27, 2012.

“John F. Kennedy – 1958 Campaigning for Senator in New Bedford, MA,” Whaling City.net.

 

JFK Speeches & Remarks: 1958

Address of Senator Kennedy, Pere Marquette Council of Knights of Columbus 60th Anniversary Banquet, Boston, Massachusetts, “Can We Compete With the Russians?,” January 12, 1958, 10pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Annual Boy Scouts of America Luncheon, New York, New York, “Foreign Policy,” January 16, 1958, 14pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy before the Women’s Club of Richmond, Virginia. “Can We Compete With the Russians?,” January 20, 1958, 17pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy upon Receipt of Honorary Degree from Saint Vincents College, Latrobe, Pennsylvania, “Careers in Politics,” February 4, 1958, 14pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Testimonial Dinner Honoring Congressman Torbert H. MacDonald, Maiden, Massachusetts, “The Need for Political Leadership,” February 8, 1958.19pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, B’nai Zion Golden Jubilee Banquet, New York, New York. “Israel: A Miracle of Progress,” February 9, 1958, 21 pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy upon Receipt of Honorary Degree from La Salle College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, “Careers in Politics,” February 11, 1958, 12pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy before the John Carroll Society, Washington, D.C., “Foreign Policy,” February 13, 1958, 38pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Fordham Law Alumni Association Luncheon, New York, New York, “Labor Racketeering,” February 15, 1958, 34pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Loyola College Annual Alumni Banquet, Baltimore, Maryland, “Education in the U.S. and USSR,” February 18, 1958, 13pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Book and Authors Club Luncheon, Cleveland, Ohio, “Intellectuals and Politicians,” February 20, 1958, 23pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Democratic Dinner, Tucson, Arizona, “The Democratic Party; U.S. Economic Problems,” February 22, 1958, 29pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Social Science Foundation Lecture, Denver University, Denver, Colorado, “The Global Challenge We Face,” February 24,1958, 44pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Fifth National Conference on International Economic Aid and Social Development, Washington, D.C., “U.S. Policy Toward India,” February 26, 1958, 18pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, United Nations Association of Maryland Dinner, Baltimore, Maryland, “The United Nations,” February 27, 1958, 27pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy at FDR Memorial Dinner, Los Angeles, California. “The Democratic Party,” March 1, 1958, 12pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy upon Receipt of Man of the Year Award by the Polish Daily News, Chicago, Illinois, “U.S. Policy Toward Poland,” March 2, 1958, 8pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, WBC Second Conference in Public Service Programming, Baltimore, Maryland, “The Challenge of Public Broadcasting,” March 6, 1958, 29pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Jefferson-Jackson Day Dinner, Bristol, Virginia, “The Democratic Party,” March 7, 1958, 12pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, AFL-CIO Unemployment Conference, Washington, D.C., “Unemployment Compensation,” March 12, 1958, 9pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Women’s Democratic Club Luncheon, Washington, D.C., “The Democratic Party; Foreign Policy,” March 13, 1958, 14pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy Before the Gridiron Club, Washington, D.C., “Leadership,” March 15, 1958, 6pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, YMCA Annual Branch Dinner, Washington, D.C., “Juvenile Delinquency,” March 19, 1958, 11pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Harvard Club, Boston, Massachusetts, “Leadership,” March 21, 1958, 16pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Jefferson-Jackson Day Dinner, Des Moines, Iowa, “The Democratic Party; Federal Farm Policy,” March 22, 1958, 53pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Freedom House, Roxbury, Massachusetts, “Education in America; Freedom House,” March 23, 1958, 19pp.

Remarks in the United States Senate by Senator Kennedy, “The Choice in Asia-Democratic Development in India,” March 25, 1958, 19pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Jefferson-Jackson Day Dinner, Indianapolis, Indiana, “The Democratic Party; Federal Farm Policy,” March 29, 1958, 27pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Jefferson-Jackson Day Dinner, Bismarck, North Dakota, “The Democratic Party; Federal Farm Policy,” April 11, 1958, 26pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Jefferson-Jackson Day Dinner, Huron, South Dakota, “The Democratic Party; George McGovern; Federal Farm Policy,” April 12, 1958, 36pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Theodore Roosevelt Centennial Lecture, Dickinson, North Dakota, “Theodore Roosevelt; Careers in Politics,” April 12, 1958, 24pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Mississippi Economic Council Dinner, Jackson, Mississippi, “Recession and Inflation,” April 16, 1958, 42pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Eighth Annual Pittsburgh World Affairs Forum, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, “The Global Challenge We Face,” April 18, 1958, 25pp.

Senator John F. Kennedy, Introduction of Senator Mike Monroney, Boston, Massachusetts, April 19, 1958, 9pp.

Remarks of Senator Kennedy, North Atlantic Regional Meeting of the National Citizens Council for Better Schools, Washington, D.C., “The Role of the Federal Government in Public Education,” April 21-April 22, 1958, 36pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Mississippi Valley Historical Association Annual Meeting, Minneapolis, Minnesota, “The Role of Politicians in History,” April 25, 1958, 21pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial Dinner, Eugene, Oregon. “Franklin Delano Roosevelt,” April 27,1958, 14pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy before the Retail Workers, Washington, D.C., “Unemployment Compensation; Minimum Wage,” April 29, 1958, 7pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Rockefeller Public Service Awards, Washington, D.C., “Continued Career Training,” April 30, 1958, 3pp.

Remarks in the United States Senate by Senator Kennedy, “Unemployment Comp- ensation,” May 8, 1958, 5pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy to Be Read by Congressman MacDonald, Fitchburgh, Massachusetts, “The Democratic Party,” May 10, 1958,10pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Greater Washington Observance of Israel’s Tenth Anniversary, Washington, D.C., “The State of Israel,” May 11, 1958, 19pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy before the Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Commerce, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, “Recession and Unemployment Compensation,” May 13, 1958, 6pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America Convention, Atlantic City, New Jersey, “Labor Racketeering,” May 14, 1958, 30pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, 150th Anniversary of Archbishopric of Boston, Boston, Massachusetts, “The Diocese of Boston,” May 14, 1958, 60pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Luncheon, Lawrence, Massachusetts, “Unemployment Compensation,” May 15, 1958, 4pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Boston College Seminar, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, “Air Travel Facilities in Boston,” May 15, 1958, 19pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Jefferson-Jackson Day Dinner, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, “The Democratic Party; Liberalism,” May 17, 1958, 41pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Jefferson-Jackson Day Dinner, Eugene, Oregon, “The Democratic Party; Liberalism,” May 18, 1958, 14pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Trinity College Commencement, Washington, D.C., “Careers in Politics,” June 2, 1958, 27pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Association of Former Residents, Freedman Hospital, Howard University Banquet, Washington, D.C., “Medical Facilities and Research,” June 4,1958, 20pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Manchester, New Hampshire, “The Democratic Party,” June 7,1958, 46pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Smith College Commencement, Northampton, Massachu- setts, “Careers in Politics,” June 8, 1958, 29pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Jefferson-Jackson Day Dinner, Morgantown, West Virginia, “The Democratic Party,” June 11, 1958, 43pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Democratic Dinner, Casper, Wyoming, “The Democratic Party; Development of Water Power,” June 14,1958, 54pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Democratic Dinner, Billings, Montana, “The Democratic Party; Federal Farm Policy,” June 15,1958, 52pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Salem Homecoming Celebration, Salem, Massa- chusetts, “History of Salem,” June 20, 1958, 5pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Tobacco Association of the United States and Leaf Tobacco Association Joint Meeting, White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia, “Reciprocal Trade,” June 23, 1958, 16pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Connecticut Democratic State Convention, Hartford, Connecticut, “The Democratic Party,” June 27, 1958, 27pp.

Remarks in the United States Senate by Senator Kennedy, “United States Military and Diplomatic Policies-Preparing for the Gap,” August 14, 1958, 6pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, American Bakery and Confectionary Workers Inter- national Union, AFL-CIO Constitutional Convention, Atlantic City, New Jersey, “Labor Racketeering,” September 10, 1958, 5pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, U.S. Mayors Conference Luncheon, Miami Beach, Florida, “Time for an Urban Magna Carta,” September 11, 1958, 9pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, United Steelworkers of America Convention, Atlantic City, New Jersey, “Labor Racketeering,” September 18, 1958, 19pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Region One Conference, Burlington, Vermont, “Rural Electrification,” September 26, 1958, 8pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy at Dedication of Lt. Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr. Memorial Science Hall, Assumption College, Wor- cester, MA, October 2, 1958.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Massachusetts Real Estate Association Banquet, Boston, Massachusetts, “Housing and Real Estate Legislation,” October 3, 1958, 19pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Annual National Corn Picking Contest, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. “Federal Farm Policy,” October 17, 1958, 12pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Massachusetts Federation of Labor Annual Samuel Gompers Memorial Dinner, Boston, Massachusetts, “Unemployment Compen- sation; Social Security; Labor Racketeer- ing,” October 25, 1958, 13pp.

Senator John F. Kennedy, Speeches, Alaska Tour, November 10, 1958-November 11, 1958, 27pp., Major Subjects: Water resource development; the Democratic Party.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Democratic Dinner, Puerto Rico. “U.S.-Latin American Relations,” November 15, 1958, 31pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, “The Democratic Party,” December 16, 1958, 21pp.
___________________________




“JFK’s Early Campaign”
1957

1956 campaign button – part of the hastily-assembled material used to boost JFK for the VP slot at the DNC.
1956 campaign button – part of the hastily-assembled material used to boost JFK for the VP slot at the DNC.
     When Jack Kennedy set out to run for President of the United States, he decided to begin early and run hard.  Kennedy had been surprised by nearly winning the 1956 Democratic nomination for Vice President at the party’s national convention in Chicago.  Adlai Stevenson, the Democrats’ presidential nominee that year, had thrown open the VP selection to the full convention, and JFK and Senator Estes Kefauver became the principal contestants. The ensuing race proved to be very close, providing Americans with some  dramatic television that summer. 

     Kennedy, who earlier in 1956 published the book, Profiles in Courage, led in the balloting at one point.  But with some arm-twisting and delegate switching, Kefauver prevailed after two rounds of roll-call voting.  Yet Kennedy would later remark to his inner circle, that if he came that close to the VP nomination after only “four hours of work and a handful of supporters,” a more concerted effort over the next several years might well give him the big prize: the presidential nomination and a shot at the White House.  And so he began in 1957 – well in advance of the 1960 Democratic National Convention – making targeted visits and traveling the U.S., all with the aim of building his candidacy from that point on through the fall 1960 presidential election campaign.

Aug. 29, 1957: Senator John F. Kennedy, far left, with other fellow senators, from left: George Smathers (D-FL), Hubert H. Humphrey (D-MN) and William Proxmire (D-WI), all listening to Majority Leader, Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX).
Aug. 29, 1957: Senator John F. Kennedy, far left, with other fellow senators, from left: George Smathers (D-FL), Hubert H. Humphrey (D-MN) and William Proxmire (D-WI), all listening to Majority Leader, Lyndon B. Johnson (D-TX).
     Kennedy in 1957 was a junior U.S. Senator nearing the end of his first six-year term, also mounting a senate re-election campaign in Massachusetts.  But even then, JFK was more than just a U.S. Senator and had begun vying for leadership within his party.  In 1957 he would win a seat on the prestigious Senate Foreign Relations Committee and also join the Senate Rackets Committee then investigating organized crime and labor — the same committee where his younger brother Bobby was serving as committee counsel. 

In early May 1957, JFK would win the Pulitzer Prize for his book Profiles in Courage.  Meanwhile, the media had already discovered the young handsome senator, who would grace the covers of a few magazines that year as well.

1956: JFK shown in publicity photo for his book, “Profiles in Courage,” which helped him gain notice in 1957 and beyond.
1956: JFK shown in publicity photo for his book, “Profiles in Courage,” which helped him gain notice in 1957 and beyond.
     The year 1957 had its share of notable events.  In late September, President Eisenhower had to send federal troops to Little Rock, Arkansas to enforce court-ordered desegregation of public schools and to keep the peace.  In October, the first earth-orbiting satellite was sent into space, Sputnik, launched by the Russians. 

Among movies that year, Peyton Place and Twelve Angry Men were popular; in literature, Jack Kerouac’s On The Road was a bestseller; on Broadway, West Side Story was playing; and on television, Leave it To Beaver made its premiere.  In the 1957 World Series, the Milwaukee Braves beat the New York Yankees in a seven-game series.

1957: RFK & JFK during Senate Racketts hearings, then  investigating crime infiltration of labor unions.
1957: RFK & JFK during Senate Racketts hearings, then investigating crime infiltration of labor unions.
     Senator Kennedy that year received more than 2,500 speaking invitations from across the nation, and he would accept more than 140 of them.  Still, out in the country, Kennedy was not well known, and in those early campaign days – referred to by his inner circle as the “undercover presidential campaign” – there would often be small turnouts and empty seats in the local venues where he appeared.  But Kennedy was also doing the important spade work of political organizing on these trips; getting to know which local politicians and organizers were the most effective and who could help him win the nomination and beyond.  What follows below is an abbreviated listing of some of JFK’s travel and speaking itinerary for the year 1957, highlighted with a few photographs and magazine covers also from that year.  A number of his speeches from 1957 are also listed below in “Sources, Links & Additional Information” at the bottom of this article.  See also at this website, “The Jack Pack, 1958-1960.”  Additional stories on JFK’s road to the White House in 1960 will be posted in future weeks.  Thanks for visiting — and please consider supporting this website. Thank you. - Jack Doyle

 

JFK’s Early Campaign
Speeches, Dinners, Media, Democratic Party Activity, Etc,.
January-December 1957

 

January 1957: JFK with University of Illinois officials in Champaign where he gave a commencement address.
January 1957: JFK with University of Illinois officials in Champaign where he gave a commencement address.
March 11, 1957: JFK on the cover of Life magazine, and author of, “Where Democrats Should Go From Here.”
March 11, 1957: JFK on the cover of Life magazine, and author of, “Where Democrats Should Go From Here.”
May 31, 1957: JFK at the University of South Carolina with university president Donald Russell.
May 31, 1957: JFK at the University of South Carolina with university president Donald Russell.
June 3, 1957: Sen. Kennedy delivering commencement address at Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY.
June 3, 1957: Sen. Kennedy delivering commencement address at Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY.
Nov. 1957: Nevada state Senator E. L. Cord shaking hands with JFK during a Young Democrats tour in Reno, NV. On the left is U.S. Senator Alan Bible (D-NV).
Nov. 1957: Nevada state Senator E. L. Cord shaking hands with JFK during a Young Democrats tour in Reno, NV. On the left is U.S. Senator Alan Bible (D-NV).

Jan-Feb 1957

Jan 12: New York, NY, Irish Institute
Jan 16: NY, NY, Armed Forces Mgmt Assoc
Jan 27: Champaign, IL, University of Illinois
Feb 4: Wash., DC, Herbert Hoover Dinner
Feb 7: Albany, GA, Chamber of Commerce
Feb 12: ABC-TV: “Omnibus: Call it Courage”
Feb 19: Atlantic City, NJ, Nat’l School Board
Feb 22: So. Bend, IN, Univ. of Notre Dame
Feb 23: Springfield, MO, Jackson Day
Feb 24: Cleve., OH, Cnf Christians & Jews

 

Mar-Apr 1957

Mar 11: JFK on cover of Life magazine
Mar 17: Baltimore, MD, St. Patrick’s Dinner
Mar 21: Birmingham, AL, Municipalities
Mar 23: NY, NY Tribune/H School Forum
Mar 29: Albuquerque, NM, Dem. Dinner
Apr 4: Lynchburg, VA, Democratic Dinner
Apr 10: Wash.,DC, Machine Products Assn.
Apr 14: NYTimes magazine article by JFK
Apr 29: Wash., DC, Notre Dame Night
Apr 29: Wash., DC, Nat’l Chamber of Com

 

May-June-July 1957

May 1: Wash., DC, U.S. Senate Portraits
May 3: Wash., DC, Assoc. Harvard Clubs
May 6: NY, NY, Overseas Press Club Spch.
May 7: Pulitzer Prize, Profiles in Courage
May 9: Wilm., DE, Jeff-Jack Day Dinner
May 11: Boston, MA, Democratic Club Mtg
May 17: Omaha, NE, Jeff-Jack Day Dinner
May 18: Lincoln, University of Nebraska
May 21: Boston, New England Publishers
May 23: Chicago, IL, Cook County Dems
May 31: Columbia, SC, Univ. of So. Carolina
Jun 3: Syracuse, NY, Syracuse University
Jun 7: Hot Springs, AR, Arkansas Bar Assoc.
Jun 10: Atlanta, GA, S.E. Peanut Assoc.
Jun 10: ” “, Univ. of GA Commencement
Jun 13: Detroit, Relief for Poland Dinner
Jun 15: Plymouth, MA, Mass. Bar Assoc.
Jun 15: Rockland, ME, Jeff-Jackson Dinner
July 1: ABC-TV’s “Press Conference” Show
July 2: U.S. Senate Spch, France & Algeria

 

Aug-Sept-Oct 1957

Aug 22: Madison, WI, Wis. Dem Dinner
Sept 1: Milton, MA, Milton Seminary
Sept 11: NY, NY, U.S. Conf. of Mayors
Sept 19: New Rochelle, NY, Iona College
Sept 19: Albany, NY, State Dem Dinner
Oct 8: Fredericton, New Brunswick Univ.
Oct 9: Chicago, Economic Club Dinner
Oct 9: Swampscott, MA, Teachers’ Convn
Oct 10: Baltimore, MD, Teachers’ Convn
Oct 10: Great Barrington, MA, Town Clerks
Oct 13: New Bedford, MA, United Givers
Oct 14: Boston, Nat’l Assoc Ag Agents
Oct 15: Chicago, Inland Daily Press Assoc
Oct 17: Jackson, MS, Young Democrats
Oct 18: Gainesville, FL, Univ. of Florida
Oct 19: Gainesville, U of FL/Phi Alpha Delta
Oct 23: NY, NY, Hungarian Fighters
Oct 23: ABC-TV(drama), Navy Log: PT 109
Oct 24: Boston, Assoc Industries of MA
Oct 27: NY, NY, Yeshiva University
Oct 30: Easton, PA, Democratic Dinner
Oct 31: Wash., DC, AFL-CIO /Indust. Dept.

 

Nov-Dec 1957

Nov 1: Philadelphia, PA, University of PA
Nov 6: Topeka, KS, Kansas Dem Club
Nov 7: Oklahoma City, Jeff-Jack Dinner
Nov 7: Oklahoma, “Farm Policy”
Nov 7: Lawrence, KS, University of KS
Nov 8: Reno, NV, Young Dem Clubs
Nov 17: NY, NY, Am. Jewish Congress
Nov 18: Daytona Bch, FL, Municipalities
Nov 19: NY, NY, Temple Emmanuel
Nov 24: NBC-TV: “Look Here”
Nov 27: Birth of Caroline Kennedy
Nov 28: Dallas, TX, Texas Teachers
Dec 2: JFK on cover of Time magazine
Dec 3: Chicago, Conf of Christians & Jews
_____________________________

Note:  The above listing of Sen. Kennedy’s travels
and speeches in 1957 may not include all of his

activities during that year.  The full titles of his
speeches are included below,  in the second half
of  “Sources.”  More photos also follow below.

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________________________________

Date Posted: 7 August 2013
Last Update: 26 October 2014
Comments to: jdoyle@pophistorydig.com

Article Citation:
Jack Doyle, “JFK’s Early Campaign: 1957,”
PopHistoryDig.com, August 7, 2013.

________________________________



Sources, Links & Additional Information

December  2, 1957: Sen. John F. Kennedy appears on the cover of Time magazine with a feature story titled, “Democrat’s Man Out Front.”
December 2, 1957: Sen. John F. Kennedy appears on the cover of Time magazine with a feature story titled, “Democrat’s Man Out Front.”
February 22, 1957: Sen. Kennedy being honored with the 1957 Patriotism Award, Notre Dame University, South Bend, Indiana.  Photo, Notre Dame archives.
February 22, 1957: Sen. Kennedy being honored with the 1957 Patriotism Award, Notre Dame University, South Bend, Indiana. Photo, Notre Dame archives.
Oct 1957: JFK receiving honorary degree from Lord Beaverbrook at University of New Brunswick in Canada, where JFK gave speech, "Good Fences Make Good Neighbors" at the fall convocation.
Oct 1957: JFK receiving honorary degree from Lord Beaverbrook at University of New Brunswick in Canada, where JFK gave speech, "Good Fences Make Good Neighbors" at the fall convocation.
Nov 7, 1957: Sen. Kennedy visits with Kansas University students while in Lawrence, KS to give the 1957 convocation speech.  Journal-World file photo.
Nov 7, 1957: Sen. Kennedy visits with Kansas University students while in Lawrence, KS to give the 1957 convocation speech. Journal-World file photo.
1957: Robert F. Kennedy (center left) and Senator John F. Kennedy (center right) during the McClellan Rackets hearings, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C.
1957: Robert F. Kennedy (center left) and Senator John F. Kennedy (center right) during the McClellan Rackets hearings, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C.
1957: Robert F. Kennedy and Senator John F. Kennedy during McClellan Rackets hearings, Washington, D.C.
1957: Robert F. Kennedy and Senator John F. Kennedy during McClellan Rackets hearings, Washington, D.C.
1957: Robert and John F. Kennedy (center) questioning witness at Senate Rackets Committee hearings.
1957: Robert and John F. Kennedy (center) questioning witness at Senate Rackets Committee hearings.
“Navy Log,” a TV series of the 1950s, included a show broadcast 23 Oct 1957 –  “PT 109" –  a dramatization of a WWII  incident, in which Naval Lieutenant Commander  John F. Kennedy helped save crew members after their PT 109 boat was struck by a Japanese destroyer.  Show was rerun, March 13,1958.
“Navy Log,” a TV series of the 1950s, included a show broadcast 23 Oct 1957 – “PT 109" – a dramatization of a WWII incident, in which Naval Lieutenant Commander John F. Kennedy helped save crew members after their PT 109 boat was struck by a Japanese destroyer. Show was rerun, March 13,1958.
JFK visiting with two of Boston’s finest while campaigning in Massachusetts sometime in 1957.
JFK visiting with two of Boston’s finest while campaigning in Massachusetts sometime in 1957.
June 1957: JFK and wife Jacqueline at family gathering at Hickory Hill house in McLean, VA, home of RFK.
June 1957: JFK and wife Jacqueline at family gathering at Hickory Hill house in McLean, VA, home of RFK.
July 1957: Jack and Jackie (then pregnant) at Tiffany benefit ball at Marble House in Newport, RI.  JFK is greeting socialite Mrs. John Drexel III.  Photo, Life / Ralph Morse.
July 1957: Jack and Jackie (then pregnant) at Tiffany benefit ball at Marble House in Newport, RI. JFK is greeting socialite Mrs. John Drexel III. Photo, Life / Ralph Morse.
November 27, 1957: JFK and Jacqueline at the christening of their daughter, Caroline, with then Archbishop Richard Cushing of Boston.
November 27, 1957: JFK and Jacqueline at the christening of their daughter, Caroline, with then Archbishop Richard Cushing of Boston.
Cover of hardback edition, “Johnny, We Hardly Knew Ye,” written by two of JFK’s closest aides, Kenny O’Donnell and Dave Powers, and published in 1970.
Cover of hardback edition, “Johnny, We Hardly Knew Ye,” written by two of JFK’s closest aides, Kenny O’Donnell and Dave Powers, and published in 1970.
Back cover of “Johnny We Hardly Knew Ye,” showing JFK at an airport with his close aides, Dave Powers (center) and Kenny O’Donnell (right), who traveled with JFK across the U.S. during his earliest campaigning.
Back cover of “Johnny We Hardly Knew Ye,” showing JFK at an airport with his close aides, Dave Powers (center) and Kenny O’Donnell (right), who traveled with JFK across the U.S. during his earliest campaigning.
Photographer Jacques Lowe’s 1961 book on JFK includes history of  JFK’s early campaigning.
Photographer Jacques Lowe’s 1961 book on JFK includes history of JFK’s early campaigning.
First edition of Theodore White’s classic political campaign book covering the 1960 presidential election.
First edition of Theodore White’s classic political campaign book covering the 1960 presidential election.
Robert Dallek’s 2003 book on John F. Kennedy, “An Unfinished Life” (hardback edition ).
Robert Dallek’s 2003 book on John F. Kennedy, “An Unfinished Life” (hardback edition ).
Chris Matthews’ 2011 book, “Jack Kennedy: Elusive Hero.”
Chris Matthews’ 2011 book, “Jack Kennedy: Elusive Hero.”
1965 hardback edition of  “A Thousand Days,” Arthur Schlesinger’s monumental, Pulitzer Prize -winning history of JFK’s time in office as President.
1965 hardback edition of “A Thousand Days,” Arthur Schlesinger’s monumental, Pulitzer Prize -winning history of JFK’s time in office as President.
2003 book, “Remembering Jack,” featuring some 600 photos of JFK and the Kennedy family by the late photographer, Jacques Lowe.
2003 book, “Remembering Jack,” featuring some 600 photos of JFK and the Kennedy family by the late photographer, Jacques Lowe.

John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, JFKlibrary.org, Boston, MA.

Kenneth P. O’Donnell and David F. Powers with Joe McCarthy, Johnny, We Hardly Knew Ye, Boston: Little Brown & Co., 1970.

Jacques Lowe, Portrait: The Emergence of John F. Kennedy, New York: Bramhall House/McGraw-Hill, 1961.

The New York Times, with photographs by Jacques Lowe, The Kennedy Years, New York: Viking Press, 1964.

The John F. Kennedy 1960 Campaign, Part II: Speeches, Press Conferences & Debates (Speech Files, 1953-1960). A Collection From the Holdings of The John F. Kennedy Library, Boston, MA, Edited by Paul L. Kesaris; Associate Editor, Robert E. Lester; Guide compiled by Douglas D. Newman (a microfilm project of University Publications of America, Inc., Frederick, MD, 1986).

“1960 Election Chronology,” DavidPietrus- za.com.

Theodore H. White, The Making of the President 1960, New York: Atheneum Publishers, 1962.

David Pietrusza, 1960–LBJ vs. JFK vs. Nixon: The Epic Campaign That Forged Three Presidencies, New York: Union Square Press, 2008.

W. H. Lawrence, “…Kefauver Is Nominated for Vice President, Defeating Kennedy on the Second Ballot; Tennessean Wins after Close Race…,” New York Times, August 18, 1956.

C. P. Trussell, “Kennedy Gets Post Sought by Kefauver; High Senate Spot Goes to Kennedy Other Assignments Listed,” New York Times, January 9, 1957

“Mideast Plan Scouted; Senator Kennedy Warns Policy Is Not Cure-All for Area,” New York Times, January 17, 1957.

Joseph A. Loftus, “Senators Agreed on Rackets Panel; Tentative Plan Puts 4 From Each Party on Special Labor Inquiry Group,” New York Times, January 26, 1957.

“Politics: Our Most Neglected Profession,” John F. Kennedy, January 27, 1957, Record Series # 39/1/5, University of Illinois Archives.

Benjamin Fine, “School Officials Urge Integration; Administrators’ Convention Adopts Strong Resolution Against Segregation; Local Action Is Asked; U. S. Building Aid Favored; Kennedy Sees Backing by Congress This Year; Federal Aid Urged,” New York Times, February 21, 1957.

John D. Morris, “7 Democrats Aid G.O.P. on Mideast; Kennedy Leads Senate Fight for Eisenhower Doctrine Without Any Revisions; Vote on Tuesday Likely…,” New York Times, March 2, 1957.

“Kennedy Warns His Party on ’60; Democrat Says ‘New Ideas’ Would Be Needed to Beat Nixon for Presidency,” New York Times, The Week In Review, March 7, 1957.

“Nixon Hails Kennedy; Praises Speech Supporting the President on Mideast,” New York Times, March 11, 1957.

John F. Kennedy, “Search For the Five Greatest Senators; a Senator Describes the Problems in Choosing the Best Men from the Senate’s 168 Years.” The New York Times Magazine, April 14, 1957.

Bill Becker, “Kennedy Favors Aid to Satellites; Urges Formulation of New U.S. Policy at Overseas Press Club Dinner,” New York Times, May 7, 1957.

“Kennedy Aids Negroes; Senator Presents $500 Pulitzer Check to College Fund,” New York Times, May 12, 1957.

Donald Janson, (Omaha, NE), “Senator Kennedy Urges ‘Bold’ U.S. Move To Grant Poland $200,000,000 in Aid.,” New York Times, May 18, 1957.

Bob Ackerman, “Kennedy Urges Graduates to Enter Politics; Says US Needs Talents,” The State  (Columbia, South Carolina), June 1, 1957.

United Press (Hot Springs, Arkansas), “Kennedy Disclaims Bid; Won’t Seek Presidency in ’60 –Suggests McClellan,” The New York Times Book Review, June 8, 1957.

“Convention to Be TV Show Audience” (JFK interviewed by ABC’s Martha Rountree on “Press Conference” show), New York Times, June 25, 1957.

“Kennedy Says He’d Run If Offered’ 60 Nomination,” Washington Post/Times Herald, July 1, 1957, p. A-12.

Arthur Krock, “Five Political Figures with a Single Thought; Three Democrats, Two Republicans Are Already in the Running For A Presidential Nomination…,” New York Times, July 7, 1957.

“Kennedy in ’60 Backed; Seen by McClellan as Possible Nominee of Democrats,” New York Times, August 5, 1957.

“Senator Kennedy To Advise For TV; He Will Oversee a ‘Navy Log’ Story of Own War Exploit…,” New York Times, August 6, 1957.

Joseph A. Loftus, “Senator Scores Inquiry Lawyers; Kennedy Says They Do More Than Advise Labor Clients…,” New York Times, August 8, 1957.

Associated Press, (Gainsville, FL), “Senator Kennedy Calls on Bar Groups To Check Unethical Practices in Field,” New York Times, Week in Review, October 20, 1957.

Navy Log: PT 109 (TV dramatization of the PT-109 incident, in which the heroism of Naval Lieutenant Commander John F. Kennedy helps save crew members when their PT boat is struck by a Japanese destroyer), Original broadcast, ABC TV October 23, 1957 (rerun March 13,1958).

Irving Spiegel, “Senator Defends Minority Causes; Kennedy Backs Principle of ‘Multiple Loyalties’– He Gets Yeshiva Award American Loyalty Concept,” New York Times, October 28, 1957.

Roger Creene, “Not Too Reluctant Is the Coy Kennedy,” Washington Post /Times Herald, November 10, 1957, p, E-3.

“Catholic President Upheld by Kennedy,” New York Times Book Review, November 25, 1957.

Sean Kirst, “Amid Election Day Fatigue, JFK’s Syracuse Reminder of the Nobility of Elected Office,” The Post-Standard, Nov. 6, 2012.

 

JFK Speeches & Remarks: 1957

Address of Senator Kennedy Before the Irish Institute, New York, New York, “Irish History,” January 12, 1957, 12pp. 

Address of Senator Kennedy at the University of Illinois Senior Convocation, Champaign, Illinois, “Politics: Our Most Neglected Profession,” January 27, 1957, 25pp. 

Address of Senator Kennedy at Dinner Honoring Herbert Hoover, Washington, D.C., “The Second Hoover Commission,” February 4,1957, 5pp. 

Address of Senator Kennedy at Annual Chamber of Commerce Dinner, Albany, Georgia, “Foreign Policy,” February 7, 1957, 23pp. 

Address of Senator Kennedy at the Annual Convention of American Association of School Administrators and National School Board Association, Atlantic City, New Jersey, “The Education of an American Politician,” February 19,1957, 21pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy upon Receipt of the 1957 Patriotism Award, Notre Dame University, South Bend, Indiana. “Careers in Politics,” February 22, 1957, 33pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy at 34th Annual Jackson Day Banquet, Springfield, Missouri, “The Democratic Party; Foreign Policy,” February 23, 1957, 37pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy at the 1957 Brotherhood Year Observance-The National Conference of Christians and Jews, Cleveland, Ohio, “Comity and Common Sense in the Middle East,” February 24, 1957, 23pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy at St. Patrick’s Day Dinner, Baltimore, Maryland, “Irish History; Labor Racketeering,” March 17, 1957, 22pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy at Alabama League of Municipalities Banquet, Birmingham, Alabama, “Labor Racke- teering,” March 21, 1957, 23pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy before the New York Herald Tribune Forum for High Schools, New York, New York, “Foreign Policy in a Democracy,” March 23, 1957, 8pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy at Democratic Dinner, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The Democratic Party; Foreign Policy,” March 29, 1957, 26pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy at Chamber of Commerce Dinner, Lynchburg, Virginia. “Labor Racketeering; Foreign Policy,” April 4, 1957, 22pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy before the National Screw Machine Products Association, Washington, D.C., “Small Business Tax Relief,” April 10, 1957, 3pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy at Universal Notre Dame Night Celebration, Washington, D.C., “Labor Racketeering,” April 29, 1957, 18pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy at the First General Session of the 45th Annual Meeting of the National Chamber of Commerce, Washington, D.C., “America’s International Responsibilities,” April 29, 1957, 21pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy from the Special Committee on the Senate Reception Room, “Choice of Five Senators Whose Portraits Are to Be Placed in the Senate Reception Room,” May 1, 1957, 82pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy at Symposium of the Associated Harvard Clubs, Washington, D.C., “The Role of the University in Government,” May 3, 1957, 6pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy at the Annual Awards Dinner of the Overseas Press Club, New York, New York, “U.S. Policy Towards Poland,” May 6, 1957, 19pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy at Delaware State Jefferson-Jackson Day Democratic Dinner, Wilmington, Delaware, “The Democratic Party,” May 9, 1957, 28pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy at Democratic Club Meeting, Boston, Massachusetts, “Participation of Women in Politics,” May 11,1957, 6pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy at Jefferson-Jackson Day Dinner, Omaha, Nebraska, “The Democratic Party; U.S. Policy Towards Poland,” May 17, 1957, 29pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy at University of Nebraska Convocation, Lincoln, Nebraska, “Careers in Politics,” May 18, 1957, 20pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, New England Publishers Association Luncheon, Boston, Massachusetts, “Labor Racketeering,” May 21, 1957, 21 pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Annual Dinner and Reception, Democratic Party of Cook County, Chicago, Illinois, The Democratic Party; U.S. Policy Towards Poland,” May 23, 1957, 23pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, University of South Carolina Commencement, Columbia, South Carolina, “Careers in Politics,” May 31, 1957, 19pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Syracuse University Commencement, Syracuse, New York, “Careers in Politics,” June 3, 1957, 20pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Arkansas Bar Association Annual Convention, Hot Springs, Arkansas,” Labor Racketeering,” June 7, 1957, 23pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy before the Southeastern Peanut Association, Atlanta, Georgia, “Farm Policy,” June 10, 1957, 5pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, University of Georgia Commencement, Athens, Georgia, “Careers in Politics,” June 10, 1957, 20pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, American Relief for Poland Dinner, Detroit, Michigan, “U.S. Policy Toward Poland,” June 13, 1957, 12pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Massachusetts Bar Association Luncheon, Plymouth, Massachusetts, “Labor Racketeering,” June 15, 1957, 13pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Jefferson-Jackson Day Dinner, Rockland, Maine, “The Democratic Party,” June 15, 1957, 19pp.

Remarks of Senator Kennedy on the Senate Floor, “The Struggle Against Imperialism-Part II: Poland and Eastern Europe,” August 21, 1957, 58pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Wisconsin Democratic Dinner, Wisconsin, “The Democratic Party,” August 22, 1957, 23pp.

Remarks of Senator Kennedy in the United States Senate. “Proposed Amendment of Constitution Relating to Election of President and Vice President,” August 30, 1957, 3pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Milton Seminary Benefactor’s Day, Milton, Massachusetts, “Christian Missionaries,” September 1,1957, 9pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, U.S. Conference of Mayors, New York, New York, “Our American Cities and Their Second Class Citizens,” September 11, 1957, 40pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, lona College Convocation, New Rochelle, New York, “Honorary Degrees,” September 19, 1957, 5pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, University of New Brunswick Convocation, Fredericton, New Brunswick, “U.S.-Canada Relations,” October 8, 1957, 16pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Economic Club Dinner, Chicago, Illinois, “Foreign Policy,” October 9, 1957, 26pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Teachers’ Association Convention, Swampscott, Massachusetts, “Education in America,” October 9, 1957, 11pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Teachers’ Association Convention, Baltimore, Maryland, “Education in America,” October 10, 1957, 14pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Massachusetts Town Clerks’ Association Convention, Great Barrington, Massachusetts, “Urban Politics,” October 10, 1957, 10pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, United Givers Fund Kick-Off Dinner, New Bedford, Massachusetts, “Philanthropy,” October 13, 1957, 15pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, National Association of County Agricultural Agents Annual Meeting, Boston, Massachusetts, “Farm Policy,” October 14, 1957, 25pp.

Address of Robert F. Kennedy before the Inland Daily Press Association, Chicago, Illinois,” Labor Racketeering,” October 15, 1957, 14pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Young Democrats Dinner, Jackson, Mississippi, “The Democratic Party,” October 17, 1957, 18pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, University of Florida Blue Key Banquet, Gainesville, Florida, “Can We Compete with the Russians?,” October 18, 1957, 15pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, University of Florida Phi Alpha Delta Legal Fraternity Breakfast, Gainesville, Florida, “Labor Racketeering,” October 19, 1957, 18pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Annual Freedom Award to the Hungarian Freedom Fighters, New York, New York, “Foreign Policy; Hungary,” October 23, 1957, 9pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Associated Industries of Massachusetts Annual Meeting, Boston, Massachusetts, “Labor Racketeering,” October 24, 1957, 14pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy upon Receipt of Yeshiva University’s Charter Day Award of 1957, New York, New York, “Tribute to James J. Lyons; Background of Yeshiva University,” October 27, 1957, 8pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Democratic City Committee Annual Pre-Election Dinner, Easton, Pennsylvania, “The Democratic Party; Leadership in Foreign Affairs,” October 30, 1957, 14pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, AFL-CIO Industrial Union Department Second Constitutional Convention, Washington, D.C., “Labor Legislation,” October 31,1957, 25pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Oklahoma, “Farm Policy,” November 1957, 7pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Howard Crawley Memorial Lecture, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. “The New Dimensions of American Foreign Policy.” November 1, 1957, 20pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Kansas Democratic Club Banquet, Topeka, Kansas, “The Democratic Party,” November 6, 1957, 3pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Oklahoma Jefferson-Jackson Day Dinner, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, “Science and Security,” November 7, 1957, 12pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, University of Kansas Convocation, Lawrence, Kansas, “Careers in Politics,” November 7, 1957, 10pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Young Democratic Clubs of America Convention, Reno, Nevada, “The Democratic Party,” November 1957, 10pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, American Jewish Congress National Congress Week, New York, New York, “U.S. Domestic Problems,” November 17, 1957, 16pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy before the Florida League of Municipalities, Daytona Beach, Florida, “Urban Politics; Labor Racketeering,” November 18, 1957, 18pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Temple Emmanuel, New York, New York, “Foreign Policy,” November 19, 1957, 9pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, Texas State Teachers Association Convention, Dallas, Texas, “American Education,” November 28, 1957, 14pp.

Address of Senator Kennedy, National Conference of Christians and Jews Dinner, Chicago, Illinois, “Foreign Policy,” December 3, 1957, 14pp.

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