The Pop History Dig

“Barack & Bruce”
2008-2012

President Barack Obama and rock star Bruce Springsteen stand arm-and-arm at Madison, Wisconsin campaign rally on November 5, 2012.  Photo, Nikki Kahn/Washington Post.
President Barack Obama and rock star Bruce Springsteen stand arm-and-arm at Madison, Wisconsin campaign rally on November 5, 2012. Photo, Nikki Kahn/Washington Post.
     One of the more interesting images from the 2012 presidential election campaign came on November 5th, 2012, the day before the election, when President Barack Obama was campaigning in Madison, Wisconsin.  On election day November 6th, The Washington Post ran a front page photo from that event of the President standing arm-and-arm with rock legend Bruce Springsteen as he waved to the crowd.  Other newspapers and news wires also used this same photo or similar ones of the same Obama-Springsteen appearance.

     The photo captures a political moment, certainly, but it also underscores how important celebrity endorsements and celebrity imagery have become in elections of all kinds – even though political analysts have said time and time again, that celebrities have only a marginal effect on persuading voters to go with one candidate or another.

Front page of November 6th, 2012 edition of Washington Post newspaper using the Obama-Springsteen photo.
Front page of November 6th, 2012 edition of Washington Post newspaper using the Obama-Springsteen photo.
     There may also be something of a first in the Washington Post putting this image on its front page.  How many times has a sitting president appeared in a campaign photo arm-and-arm with a celebrity that ran on the front page of a national newspaper – or on the cover of a major news magazine?  Presumably, that’s pretty rare – especially on election day.

     But perhaps that’s a moot question in these times since presidents and presidential candidates appear frequently with celebrities in many public venues.  And yes, politicians have been courting the rich, famous, and otherwise influential since forever.  Politicians in ancient Rome no doubt sought out famous gladiators and popular generals to do their bidding.

The December 2007 endorsement of  U.S. Senator Barack Obama for president by TV celebrity Oprah Winfrey (yellow jacket) made front page news across the country.
The December 2007 endorsement of U.S. Senator Barack Obama for president by TV celebrity Oprah Winfrey (yellow jacket) made front page news across the country.
     More recently, in 20th century American politics, Franklin D. Roosevelt sought Frank Sinatra’s help in the 1940s – as did John F. Kennedy in 1960.  On television, Richard Nixon appeared on Jack Parr’s late night TV talk show in 1963, and also in one memorable 1968 Laugh-In TV spot.  Ronald and Nancy Reagan stood arm-in-arm with R&B legend Ray Charles in a prime-time TV moment during the 1984 Republican National Convention.  Bill Clinton played saxophone on The Arsenio Hall Show in June 1992, an appearance some say helped Clinton win new supporters.  And in December 2007, Barack Obama received the endorsement of Oprah Winfrey in a much publicized moment during the Democratic presidential primary – also captured on a number of newspaper front pages.

     Today of course, politicians appear regularly on TV shows such as the  Late Show with David Letterman, The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, The View,  The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, and others.  And with the web and You Tube, images of politicians and celebrities are now quite ubiquitous.  It is also noted that in recent years even papers like the Washington Post have included more coverage of celebrities in politics, with regular sections devoted to celebrity doings on all manner of public policy, consequential or not.

     Yet there is still something indelible and lasting about photographs of the Springsteen-Obama variety displayed on the front pages of major newspapers.  Clearly, the decisions by major news organizations to use such images in prominent display are not minor matters, or made without purpose.  In this specific case, no doubt, the choice of photo and its placement likely had something to do with the type of Midwest working-class voters that pundits were saying Obama absolutely needed to win re-election – and Bruce Springsteen’s appeal to those very same voters.  But beyond these questions of news organization photo choices and the play now given celebrities in politics, the Obama-Springsteen alliance is interesting in its own right, and has a history that now stretches over several years.


Bruce Springsteen performing at an Obama campaign rally in Cleveland, Ohio, 2008.
Bruce Springsteen performing at an Obama campaign rally in Cleveland, Ohio, 2008.
2008 Campaign

     Bruce Springsteen has been in Barack Obama’s corner since at least April 2008 when he first endorsed then U.S. Senator Barack Obama for the Democratic presidential nomination.  Obama at the time was battling Hillary Clinton for his party’s presidential nomination.  Springsteen, who first became a rock sensation in the mid-1970s, has been sought out by politicians for years who have tried to associate with his music, gain his endorsement, and/or use his name in a speech, as Ronald Reagan did when he was campaigning for reelection in New Jersey in September 1984.

     But in April 2008 when Springsteen endorsed Obama, the rock star explained that the candidate “speaks to the America I’ve envisioned in my music for the past 35 years.”  In a letter Springsteen posted on his website addressed to friends and fans, he explained that he believed Obama was the best candidate to undo “the terrible damage done over the past eight years.”  In Springsteen’s view, Obama had “the depth, the reflectiveness, and the resilience to be our next president…”

Nov. 2, 2008: Bruce Springsteen with then presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama at rally in Cleveland, Ohio. AP photo/Alex Brandon.
Nov. 2, 2008: Bruce Springsteen with then presidential candidate Sen. Barack Obama at rally in Cleveland, Ohio. AP photo/Alex Brandon.
     During the 2008 campaign, Springsteen appeared at several Obama rallies, and also performed several solo acoustic performances in support of Obama.  Near the end of the 2008 campaign, on November 2nd, he debuted the song “Working on a Dream” in a duet with his wife, Patti Scialfa.

     At one Ohio rally during the 2008 campaign, Springsteen discussed the importance of “truth, transparency and integrity in government, the right of every American to have a job, a living wage, to be educated in a decent school, and a life filled with the dignity of work, the promise and the sanctity of home…But today those freedoms have been damaged and curtailed by eight years of a thoughtless, reckless and morally-adrift administration.”

     On the night of Obama’s electoral victory, November 4, 2008, Springsteen’s song “The Rising” was the first song played at the Chicago Grant Park rally after Obama’s victory speech.

Bruce Springsteen performing "The Rising" with an all-female choir at President Obama’s inauguration, 2009.
Bruce Springsteen performing "The Rising" with an all-female choir at President Obama’s inauguration, 2009.
January 18, 2009: Scene around the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. during inaugural concert & festivities.
January 18, 2009: Scene around the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. during inaugural concert & festivities.

     Bruce Springsteen was also the opening musical act for the Obama Inaugural Celebration at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. on January 18, 2009 – an event attended by more than 400,000 people. 

     At that celebration, Springsteen performed “The Rising” with an all-female choir and also sang Woody Guthrie’s “This Land Is Your Land” with Pete Seeger.  Springsteen and Seeger were not the only performers that day, as a number of others performed then and through the evening with the various inaugural balls.

     A long list of Hollywood stars and musical artists came to Washington as invited performers, readers, and special guests to fete Obama on his special day.  A partial list of some of those involved in the inaugural festivities include the following: Jack Black, Mary J. Blige, Jon Bon Jovi, Garth Brooks, Steve Carrell, Sheryl Crow, Rosario Dawson, Renee Fleming, Jamie Foxx, Josh Groban, Herbie Hancock, Tom Hanks, Heather Headley, Ashley Judd, Martin Luther King III, Beyonce Knowles, Queen Latifah, Bettye Lavette, John Legend, Laura Linney, George Lopez, Jennifer Nettles, John Mellencamp, Kal Penn, Shakira, James Taylor, Marisa Tomei, Usher, U2, Denzel Washington, Forest Whitaker, will.i.am, Stevie Wonder, Tiger Woods, and others.


Kennedy Center Honors

Actor Robert De Niro looks on as President Obama congratulates Bruce Springsteen as a Kennedy Center Honoree during a December 2009 White House ceremony.
Actor Robert De Niro looks on as President Obama congratulates Bruce Springsteen as a Kennedy Center Honoree during a December 2009 White House ceremony.
     In December 2009, Bruce Springsteen was one of five recipients designated for the Kennedy Center Honors – an annual award made to various artists for their contributions to American culture.  In addition to Springsteen, Mel Brooks, Dave Brubeck, Grace Bumbry, and Robert De Niro were also honored that year.  At a White House reception for the honorees, here is what President Obama had to say about Springsteen:

…Finally, we honor the quiet kid from Jersey — (laughter) — who grew up to become the rock ‘n’ roll laureate of a generation.  For in the life of our country only a handful of people have tapped the full power of music to tell the real American story — with honesty; from the heart; and one of those people is Bruce Springsteen.

He has said: “I’ve always believed that people listen to your music not to find out about you, but to find out about themselves.”  And for more than three decades, in his songs — of dreams and despair, of struggle and hope — hardworking folks have seen themselves.

They’ve seen their great state of New Jersey.  And they’ve seen their America — in songs that become anthems.  Restless kids who were “Born to Run.”  The struggles of workers in “My Hometown.”  The sacrifices of vets who were “Born in the U.S.A.”  Love and loss in “Streets of Philadelphia.”  A resilient nation in “The Rising.”  And, this year, a country “Working on a Dream.”

…[W]hen I watched him on  the steps of the Lincoln Memorial when he rocked the National Mall before my inauguration,I thought it captured as well as anything the spirit of what America should be about…
           – President Barack Obama

It’s no wonder that his tours are not so much concerts, but communions.  There’s a place for everybody -— the sense that no matter who you are or what you do, everyone deserves their shot at the American Dream; everybody deserves a little bit of dignity; everybody deserves to be heard.

I’ve seen it myself.  Bruce was a great fan — a great friend over the last year, and when I watched him on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial when he rocked the National Mall before my inauguration, I thought it captured as well as anything the spirit of what America should be about. On a day like that, and today, I remember: I’m the President, but he’s The Boss. (Applause.)

And Bruce continues to inspire, along with his “house-rocking, earth-shaking” E Street Band.  At 60 years old, he’s still filling stadiums, still whipping fans into a frenzy, still surfing the crowd, still jumping off pianos, and still reaching new fans, and still being nominated for Grammys.  It’s been a long road from that stage at Stone Pony in Asbury Park to this stage today, but this much we know — after more than 30 years and 120 million albums sold, Bruce Springsteen is still one “cool rockin’ Daddy.” (Laughter and applause.)

     At the Kennedy Center ceremony, Springsteen was also lauded by several celebrities including Jon Stewart, with musical tributes from John Mellencamp, Ben Harper, Jennifer Nettles, Melissa Etheridge, Eddie Vedder, and Sting.  Meanwhile, back in Springsteen’s home state of New Jersey, some developments on the Republican side of the political aisle during 2009 would also involve the singer and his music.


2009: New Jersey’s Chris Christie.
2009: New Jersey’s Chris Christie.
No To Christie

     In November 2009, Chris Christie – an up-and-coming Republican star in New Jersey’s political ranks who had been a top fundraiser for George W. Bush’s 2000 presidential campaign, and later, New Jersey’s U.S. attorney – was elected governor.  He had defeated former Democratic governor and U.S. Senator Jon Corzine.  Christie was also a devoted Bruce Springsteen fan who had attended more than 120 of Springsteen’s concerts. 

     Christie regarded Springsteen’s politics as a form of populism that anyone could identify with, though he parts ways with Springsteen on some of his core philosophy, such as his view  that “nobody wins unless everybody wins.”  Christie holds “that in life there are winners and losers — there just are… We can’t make everybody winners.  But you can make more people winners.”  Christie says he doesn’t take Sprinsteen’s politics personally.  For him, with Springsteen, it’s the music that matters.

     After his election, Christie wanted nothing more than to have Springsteen appear at his inauguration, scheduled for January 2010.  Through an intermediary, Christie sent word to Springsteen’s manager, Jon Landau, to ask if Springsteen would perform.  Christie offered to make a gift to Springsteen’s charity of choice if he would agree to perform for the governor-elect.In late 2009, New Jersey  governor Chris Christie wanted Springsteen to perform at his inaugural festivities.  Knowing that Springsteen was a Democrat, Christie’s people also offered to put a little distance between the Christie inauguration and any Springsteen event, suggesting a benefit concert in the week leading up to the January 19th inaugural.  The editors of The Star Ledger newspaper of Newark, New Jersey, the state’s largest circulation newspaper, even ran an editorial on November 7th urging Springsteen to do the concert, saying the state needed “a Kumbaya moment.”  But word came back that Springsteen did not want to get involved in state politics.  Springsteen’s rejection was reportedly polite – that he was quite aware that Christie was a fan, and as a loyal citizen of New Jersey, wished him every success as governor.  Christie’s people then arranged for the B Street Band, a Springsteen tribute band, to perform at the governor-elect’s inaugural party.  But there would be more to come with Christie and Springsteen later.  Christie, in any case, became more of a national figure as he began to be touted as a possible Republican Presidential candidate.


Bruce Springsteen with harmonica.
Bruce Springsteen with harmonica.
2012 Campaign

     In early 2012, it appeared that Springsteen was not going to become involved in the Obama re-election campaign.  In January, he told ABC News: “I prefer to stay on the sidelines… I genuinely believe an artist [is] supposed to be the canary in the coal mine, and you’re better off with a certain distance from the seat of power.” 

     Springsteen noted at the time that he wasn’t entirely happy with Obama’s first term.  He said he would have liked to have seen “more activism in job creation sooner than it came,” but that Obama had generally done a good job up to that, ticking off some of the President’s accomplishments:  “…He kept GM alive, which was incredibly important to Detroit and Michigan, and he got the health care law passed, although I wish there had been a public option and didn’t leave the citizens victims of the insurance companies.  He killed Osama bin Laden, which was extremely important.  He brought some sanity to the top level of government.”

Cover art for Bruce Springsteen single, "We Take Care of Our Own."
Cover art for Bruce Springsteen single, "We Take Care of Our Own."
     Musically, meanwhile, Springsteen had been working on a new album that would bear the title, Wrecking Ball, his 17th studio album; an album that included a compilation of songs that were a reaction to, and indictment of, Wall Street’s financial crisis and the effect it has had on the nation and people’s lives.

     Wrecking Ball wouldn’t be released until March 2012, but one of its songs was released early – “We Take Care of Our Own” – which made its live debut on February 12, 2012 at the 54th Grammy Awards. 

     The song is a lament that finds a nation in trouble, hinting at the divided partisanship and a government that has had its failings in helping people.  “I been looking for the map that leads me home,” Springsteen sings.  “I been stumbling on good hearts turned to stone / The road of good intentions has gone dry as a bone.”  The song’s central message appears to be that we are a nation that does take care of our own – that is our core philosophy and who we are; something we all understand.  Yet we haven’t always done that, and sometimes we falter.  And now, in the throes the current hard times, the Springsteen song is reminding us that we need to get back to that task, as he sings:. “Wherever this flag’s flown, we take care of our own.”

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“We Take Care Of Our Own”

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     On February 9th, 2012, a few days before the song’s airing at the Grammy Awards, Obama’s reelection team released a playlist of five songs the campaign would be using at campaign rallies.  Among the songs was Springsteen’s “We Take Care of Our Own.”  Others on the list included: “I Got You” by Wilco; “Roll With The Changes” by REO Speedwagon; “You’ve Got The Love” by Florence & The Machine; and, “Let’s Stay Together” by Al Green.

“We Take Care of Our Own”
Bruce Springsteen


I’ve been knockin’ on the door that holds the throne
I’ve been lookin’ for the map that leads me home
I’ve been stumblin’ on good hearts turned to stone
Those good intentions have gone dry as bone
We take care of our own
We take care of our own
Wherever this flag’s flown
We take care of our own

From Chicago to New Orleans
From the muscle to the bone
From the shotgun shack to the Superdome
We needed help but the cavalry stayed home,
There ain’t no-one hearing the bugle blown
We take care of our own
We take care of our own
Wherever this flag’s flown
We take care of our own

Where’s the eyes, the eyes with the will to see
Where’s the hearts, they run over with mercy
Where’s the love that has not forsaken me
Where’s the work that set my hands, my soul free
Where’s the spirit to reign, reign over me
Where’s the promise, from sea to shining sea
Where’s the promise, from sea to shining sea
Wherever this flag is flown
Wherever this flag is flown
Wherever this flag is flown

We take care of our own
We take care of our own
Wherever this flag’s flown
We take care of our own
We take care of our own
We take care of our own
Wherever this flag’s flown
We take care of our own

     However, the Springsteen tune became a popular and often used song during the Obama campaign – as its main refrain – “we take care of our own” – was generally a good fit with what the Obama Administration was trying to do with its economic recovery programs; trying to lift the nation out of its hard times.  At the Democratic National Convention in early September 2012, the song also received some prime-time exposure when it was played immediately following Barack Obama’s speech on September 6th.  While Obama’s speech may not have been the highlight of the convention, the airing of the Springsteen song at that time helped boost the music.  According to Billboard, sales for “We Take Care Of Our Own” jumped more 400 percent during the weekend that ended September 9, 2012, following Obama’s speech.  And by late September, after Mitt Romney’s remarks at a private fundraiser were made public about how “47 percent” of the electorate were victims and that he wouldn’t have to worry about them if elected President, the Springsteen song, “We Take Care of Our Own,” took on even more resonance at the Obama rallies.

     But Springsteen himself had repeated his intent to stay out of the race, making remarks to The New Yorker in July 2012, saying that he wasn’t sure whether he’d get involved again:  “I did it twice [once for Kerry in 2004 and Obama in 2008] because things were so dire… It seemed like if I was ever going to spend whatever small political capital I had, that was the moment to do so.  But that capital diminishes the more often you do it.  While I’m not saying never, and I still like to support the President, you know, it’s something I didn’t do for a long time, and I don’t have plans to be out there every time.”  But as the race tightened in late September and early October, especially following Obama’s faltering in the first debate, Springsteen once again became a more visible Obama supporter.

Ticket to Bill Clinton-Bruce Sprinsteen rally for Obama in Parma, Ohio.
Ticket to Bill Clinton-Bruce Sprinsteen rally for Obama in Parma, Ohio.
Bill Clinton greeting Bruce Springsteen on stage at Parma, Ohio Obama rally.
Bill Clinton greeting Bruce Springsteen on stage at Parma, Ohio Obama rally.

     By October 13th, the White House was reporting that Springsteen would campaign for Obama.  “Bruce Springsteen’s values echo what the President and Vice President stand for: hard work, fairness, integrity,” said Jim Messina, Obama for America’s campaign manager.  “His appearances will help with our get out the vote effort in these critical swing states and we are thrilled with his ongoing support.” 

     On October 17, 2012, Springsteen took to his website to explain his support for the President.  “A message from Bruce” noted in part: “Right now, there is a fight going on to help make this a fairer and more equitable nation.  For me, President Obama is our best choice to get us and keep us moving in the right direction…”  In the message, Springsteen also voiced support for “sterling candidates” Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) and Elizabeth Warren, the Massachusetts Democrat seeking a U.S. Senate seat.

     On the following day, October 18th, 2012, Springsteen joined former president Bill Clinton at an Obama campaign rally in Parma, Ohio, near Cleveland.  A crowd of 3,000 fill a gymnasium at Cuyahoga Community College, with 700 more in an overflow area.

     Rosalind Helderman of the Washington Post filed her story on the event with the opening: “President Obama brought the big guns — Bubba and the Boss — to Ohio Thursday to shore up his slim edge in the key battleground state.”  Bill Clinton, for his part, said during the rally, as reported by the New York Times: “This is the first time in my life I ever got to be the warm-up act for Bruce Springsteen… I am qualified ’cause I was born in the U.S.A.,” said Clinton, “and unlike one of the candidates for president, I keep all my money here!”

     Springsteen told the Ohio crowd that he’d spent three decades “writing about the distance between the American dream and the American reality” and believed Obama was the man to help close the gap between the two.  Voting, he said, was “the principle way we get to determine that distance and that equation… Voting matters.  Elections matter.” 

Bruce Springsteen performing with acoustic guitar at Obama rally in Parma, Ohio.
Bruce Springsteen performing with acoustic guitar at Obama rally in Parma, Ohio.
     Springsteen performed a set of four songs in Parma, and on the same day, he also appeared at another Obama event in Ames, Iowa.  After that, there were more appearances by Springsteen at Obama events in Virginia, Pittsburgh and Wisconsin.  On Saturday afternoon, October 27th in Pittsburgh, for example, he performed for Obama before a capacity crowd at the Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall and Military Museum. 

     In late October, however, as Hurricane Sandy began it destructive trek up the East Coast, the presidential campaign was temporarily overshadowed.  But this event, too, figured into the Obama-Springsteen interplay and national politics.


Hurricane Sandy

President Barack Obama hugs marina owner Donna Vanzant as he tours hurricane-damaged Brigantine, N.J., with Gov. Chris Christie, Oct. 31, 2012.  Photo, Larry Downing /Reuters.
President Barack Obama hugs marina owner Donna Vanzant as he tours hurricane-damaged Brigantine, N.J., with Gov. Chris Christie, Oct. 31, 2012. Photo, Larry Downing /Reuters.
     On the evening of October 29th, 2012, Hurricane Sandy made landfall at Atlantic City in southern New Jersey, and soon ravaged the NewYork-New Jersey area with severe flooding and extensive damage to coastal areas.  The hurricane occurred in the final weeks of the presidential election campaign, putting both the Obama and Romney campaigns into a temporary lull.  But the catastrophe brought President Obama to the storm-damaged New York-New Jersey area, raising his national leader visibility as full state and national emergency efforts were launched to deal with the devastation.  The President came to the hard hit areas, and joined with New York Governor Cuomo, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, and New Jersey Governor Chris Christie to commit government help to the devastated communities.  New Jersey Governor Chris Christie had praise for the president during the crisis – a sore point with the Republicans and the president’s opponent, Gov. Mitt Romney.  “It’s really important to have the President of the United States acknowledge all the suffering that’s going on here in New Jersey and I appreciate it very much,” Christie said during Obama’s October 31st visit to the Brigantine Beach Community Center in Brigantine, N.J., north of Atlantic City.  Christie and the President stayed in contact by phone in the days following the disaster.

Steven Tyler, Jimmy Fallon, Mark Rivera & Bruce Springsteen perform during NBC's Hurricane Sandy telethon which raised 32 million dollars. Photo, Heidi Gutman/NBC
Steven Tyler, Jimmy Fallon, Mark Rivera & Bruce Springsteen perform during NBC's Hurricane Sandy telethon which raised 32 million dollars. Photo, Heidi Gutman/NBC
     Meanwhile, Bruce Springsteen, a New Jersey native who came to fame in Asbury Park, also became involved in Sandy relief effort.  He was doing his scheduled concert appearances during this time as well, and on October 31, 2012, two days following the storm, he dedicated his performance at a concert in Rochester, New York to those affected by the storm and those helping with the recovery effort.  At another concert at Penn State University on November 1st, he gave a shout out to Governor Christie for his hurricane work.

     On Friday November 2nd, 2012, Springsteen and Jon Bon Jovi, also a New Jersey native, joined Sting, Christina Aguilera and other music stars for an NBC-organized televised benefit concert to raise funds for victims of Sandy.  The show, titled “Hurricane Sandy: Coming Together” was organized by NBC as a commercial-free one- hour benefit. In addition to Bon Jovi, Sting, Springsteen and Agulera were other performers and celebrities, including: Billy Joel, Jimmy Fallon, Steven Tyler, Mary J. Blige, Tina Fey, Jon Stewart, Whoopi Goldberg, Danny DeVito and NBC News’ Brian Williams. Today show co-anchor Matt Lauer was the host.  During the show, Springsteen joined Billy Joel, Steven Tyler and Jimmy Fallon for a performance of “Under the Boardwalk.” Springsteen and the E Street Band closed the show on a message of hope with a rousing rendition of their tune “Land of Hope and Dreams.”  The telethon raised some $32 million.  All money was donated to the American Red Cross.

Gov. Christie & Bruce Springsteen back- stage at NBC's Hurricane Sandy telethon.
Gov. Christie & Bruce Springsteen back- stage at NBC's Hurricane Sandy telethon.
     Backstage at this event, Springsteen had a moment with one of his biggest fans, Governor Chris Christie, where according to Christie, “we hugged and he told me, ‘it’s official, we’re friends’.”  A quick photo of this meeting, capturing a handshake between the two backstage, was taken by Al Roker of NBC, shown at left.  A few days later, when Springsteen was traveling with Obama to make a few final campaign stops, the President was getting a post-Sandy telephone update from Christie when he told the governor he had someone who wanted to talk with him, bringing Springsteen on the line.  “We had a good conversation today,” said Christie of the call.  “It was great to talk to the president and even better to talk to Bruce.”


Campaign Resumes

Poster for final campaign event in Des Moines, Iowa for Nov 5, 2012 with the President, Michelle Obama & Bruce Springsteen.
Poster for final campaign event in Des Moines, Iowa for Nov 5, 2012 with the President, Michelle Obama & Bruce Springsteen.
     As the presidential race resumed in early November, the Obama campaign announced that Springsteen would be making more appearances at Obama rallies in Wisconsin, Ohio, and Iowa on November 5th, 2012, the day before the election.  Springsteen then appeared on that day at three rallies for Obama – one in Madison, Wisconsin; one in Columbus, Ohio with Jay-Z; and a final appearance in Des Moines, Iowa with the president and Michelle Obama. 

     Other entertainers would also appear for Obama the final weekend before the election – John Mellencamp, Saturday, November 3rd in Iowa; Dave Matthews the same day in Virginia; and Stevie Wonder on Sunday November 4th in Cincinnati.  Springsteen and his wife Patti, meanwhile, would travel with Obama on Air Force One for at least part of the tour on November 5th.  Reportedly, the President even remarked: “I’m going to be flying with Bruce Springsteen on the last day I’ll ever campaign, that’s not a bad way to bring it home.”

     On that day, November 5th, the first of three stops was Madison, Wisconsin, the state capital, and home to the University of Wisconsin.  The rally took place in the streets near the capitol building.  Some 18,000 supporters had gathered there in the cold as early as 6:30 a.m., four hours before Obama would arrive.

President Barack Obama greeting Bruce Springsteen at Madison, WI campaign rally.
President Barack Obama greeting Bruce Springsteen at Madison, WI campaign rally.
     Springsteen opened the rally with his “No Surrender” song.  Helene Cooper of the New York Times, reporting on the final day’s itinerary, noted that Obama aides, David Plouffe, David Axelrod and Robert Gibbs had positioned themselves atop a crane to get a better view of Springsteen, who also played “The Promised Land.”  Springsteen also added commentary between songs, saying at one point: “It’s crunch time now, the president’s job, our job, yours and mine – whether you’re a Republican, a Democrat, an independent, rich, poor, black, brown, white, gay, straight, soldier, civilian – is to keep that hope alive.”  Springsteen’s final song was “Land of Hope and Dreams,” after which Obama came up on the stage, greeting Springsteen with a bear hug.  Obama had been on whirlwind cross-country jaunt of swing states and was then drinking warm tea in between appearances to soothe an overworked voicebox.  “We have come too far to turn back now…,” Obama told the Madison gathering.  “Now is the time to keep pushing forward.”

     On the way to the next rally, in Columbus, Ohio, Springsteen sat with Obama aboard Air Force One as the two discussed the Hurricane Sandy recovery effort then underway in New Jersey.  That’s when the President was also speaking on the phone with Governor Chris Christie, and when he brought Springsteen on the line to chat briefly with the governor.

President Barack Obama on stage at Columbus, Ohio rally Nov. 5, 2012, flanked by Jay-Z and Bruce Springsteen.
President Barack Obama on stage at Columbus, Ohio rally Nov. 5, 2012, flanked by Jay-Z and Bruce Springsteen.
     In Columbus, more than 15,000 turned out for the Obama event at the Nationwide Arena that included both Springsteen and rapper Jay-Z.   But before the two artists would perform, a series of local and state politicians made various introductions and short statements, including Columbus mayor Michael Coleman, Ohio Governor Ted Strickland, and U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown.  Then came Springsteen followed by Jay-Z.  Springsteen did a short set of abridged versions of “No Surrender” and “The Promised Land,” as well as a campaign sing-along for the Obama campaign’s “Forward” slogan.  Jay-Z followed with some animated rap that the crowd loved, adapting his “99 Problems” song for to fit the President’s rival: “I got 99 problems,” he rapped, “but Mitt ain’t one…”  Jay-Z also introduced the president in Columbus.  Obama, addressing the crowd, said: “Ohio, after four years, you know me by now… You may be frustrated with the pace of change but that’s O.K., so am I…”  Obama also said of Jay-Z and Springsteen that day: “Not only are they on my iPod – and yes, the president has an iPod – both of them tell an American story.” 

Jay-Z on the cover of the Forbes 400 "rich list" issue for 2010, along with Warren Buffett.
Jay-Z on the cover of the Forbes 400 "rich list" issue for 2010, along with Warren Buffett.
     Jay-Z, whose real name is Shawn Carter, grew up in Brooklyn and had earlier struggles with crime, but went on become a very successful recording artist, music producer and wealthy businessman, marrying pop star Beyoncé Knowles and recently becoming a father.  

     During the Columbus rally, Obama remarked of some similarities between he and Jay-Z:  “Nobody would expect us to be where we are today if they had met us as younger men, both of us have daughters, and both of us have wives who are more popular than we are.”  Obama also told the crowd that Jay-Z and Springsteen were examples of “what our country is about” – two guys who rose from humble beginnings to go on to fame and fortune. 

     Their music that day, in any case, helped bring out a diverse and appreciative crowd.  Karmesha Hicks, a 20-year-old student from Berea, Ohio attending the rally told a reporter on the way out : “It was very inspirational… I love that he brought two very different artists together.  It shows what he [Obama] is about.”

Jay-Z, President Obama & Bruce Sprinsteen have one last wave to the crowd in Columbus, Ohio.
Jay-Z, President Obama & Bruce Sprinsteen have one last wave to the crowd in Columbus, Ohio.
     For Obama, the Columbus rally marked his 29th political appearance in Ohio for 2012.  The president had also done a number of taped radio interviews that day, dropped in for a visit at his Columbus campaign office, and appeared on ESPN during halftime of “Monday Night Football” that evening, as did Mitt Romney. 

     A few hours later that same day, also in Columbus,  Romney and his wife Ann appeared before an enthusiastic crowd in a large airport hangar at Port Columbus.  At that rally, the Marshall Tucker Band helped stir the crowd for Romney and he also had two well-known Ohio athletes speak there before he took the podium – ice skater Scott Hamilton and pro golfer Jack Nicklaus.

     Back at the Obama rally at the Nationwide Arena, President Obama, after he gave his speech, brought Springsteen and Jay-Z back up to the stage (along with the prior speakers as well) for one last wave to crowd  — this as a recorded version of “We Take Care of Our Own” played in the background.  Then it was on to Iowa.

Bruce Springsteen escorted first lady Michelle Obama to the stage in Des Moines, 5 Nov `12.
Bruce Springsteen escorted first lady Michelle Obama to the stage in Des Moines, 5 Nov `12.
     According to a New York Times report, Air Force One arrived at the Des Moines airport at 8:59 p.m. Central Time.  This was to be Obama’s last campaign stop that day before going home to Chicago where he and his family owuld await the election returns.  His motorcade waited on the tarmac at Des Moines since the flight with first lady Michelle Obama arrived about 15 minutes later, when the president got out of his car to greet and hug his wife as she exited the plane.  From there, the motorcade made its way to downtown Des Moines where some 20,000 supporters were waiting in a section of town lit up with floodlights for the event.  At about 9:30 p.m., Bruce Springsteen made his introduction and played ‘The Promised Land.”

     He closed out his 25-minute mix of songs and commentary with “Land of Hope and Dreams,” finishing just before 10 p.m., when he introduced First Lady Michelle Obama to the crowd.  Mrs. Obama thanked the “great state of Iowa” for launching the Obama bid to “change the country four years ago” and not long thereafter, introduced her husband.

Michelle & Barack Obama wave to the crowd in Des Moines, Iowa, Nov. 5, 2012.
Michelle & Barack Obama wave to the crowd in Des Moines, Iowa, Nov. 5, 2012.
     President Obama underscored the fact that it was in Des Moines where his campaign in 2008 really got its start.  He reminisced with the crowd about how his improbable bid back in the winter of 2008, with its upset victory over Hilary Clinton and John Edwards in the Iowa Democratic primary, sent him on his way. 

     The President teared up a bit as he recalled those days, but went on to give a rousing 30-minute speech, telling the crowd, “I‘ve come back to Iowa one more time to ask for your vote,” adding that his campaign would “finish where we started.” 

     Beyond the nostalgia, Iowa was also a key state in the President’s Midwestern campaign strategy.  Victories in Iowa, Wisconsin and Ohio would put the president over the required 270 electoral votes needed for reelection.

     Obama was up by about five points in the state according to most of the Iowa polls, but his campaign was taking nothing for granted.  The Des Moines Register had endorsed him in 2008, but this time the leading Iowa newspaper had sided with Mitt Romney.  After the Iowa stop, the Obama campaign moved on to Chicago where, among other things, the President was scheduled to have a bit of exercise in a traditional election-day pick-up basketball game.


November 6, 2012: Election day edition of the “State Journal” newspaper in Madison, WI showing President Obama greeting Bruce Springsteen at rally a day earlier.
November 6, 2012: Election day edition of the “State Journal” newspaper in Madison, WI showing President Obama greeting Bruce Springsteen at rally a day earlier.
Election Day

     On election day, voter turnout was heavy in a number of states, with polling places extending hours in some cases as long lines had formed.  The ongoing tabulation of results remained close well into the night, with special attention focused on some seven key swing states, Ohio chief among them.  Sometime after 11:15 pm Eastern Time, various news organizations called Ohio and Iowa for President Obama, and not long thereafter, at about 11:30 pm, they began calling the presidential election for Obama.

     The final election results revealed that Obama took 50.96 percent of the popular vote with 65,464,068 votes, while Mitt Romney had 47.31 percent with 60,781,275 votes.  The electoral talley was 332 for Obama and 206 for Romney. 

     In the various election post-mortems of how each candidate had performed, there were analysts who noted the help Obama had received from Hollywood and music industry celebrities.  One post-election piece from Slate writer Ron Rosenbaum suggested that Bruce Springsteen’s appearances, in particular, might have played a key role in swaying undecided souls in key battleground states like Ohio:

…Indeed, in the final days, with Bruce riding around with Obama on Air Force One, it was almost as though he was on the ticket, Obama’s spiritual VP.  Or at least ambassador from Asbury Park….  And the concerts and especially that song ["We Take Care of Our Own"] —the guy knows how to go straight for the heart, like a laser-guided drone.  He knows how to make you feel, for at least an instant, we could all be better than we are.  That’s a talent.

And with the election coming down to the last minutes, the last few votes, it can’t be insignificant that the demographic of attendees drawn to Obama campaign events by all those free Bruce concerts was the heart of the heart of the undecided voter segment that would eventually give Obama the election.  After all, once you consider that Obama won Ohio by fewer than 2 percent, don’t try to tell me the combination of Sandy, Christie, and above all Bruce wasn’t the decider.  In fact the Wall Street Journal post-election analysis of the Ohio vote put Obama’s margin in swing counties in Ohio at 16,176—about the total for a couple of small Bruce concerts…


Bruce Not Alone

2010: President Obama talks with actor George Clooney outside Oval Office. Clooney hosted a Los Angeles fundraiser for the president in May 2012. Photo, Pete Souza/White House
2010: President Obama talks with actor George Clooney outside Oval Office. Clooney hosted a Los Angeles fundraiser for the president in May 2012. Photo, Pete Souza/White House
     But Bruce Springsteen was certainly not alone among high-profile celebrities who helped Obama in his reelection bid.  While Springsteen was performing with Obama in November, for example, John Mellencamp was doing the same with Vice President Joe Biden an Jill Biden in Virginia.

     In fact, throughout the 2012 campaign, a number of musicians helped Obama with concerts, rallies, and other support.  In April, the Red Hot Chili Peppers gave a private performance for 1,200 campaign staffers in Cleveland; in July, Alicia Keys headlined a rally for women voters in Philadelphia; and in early October, Stevie Wonder, Katy Perry, Jon Bon Jovi and Jennifer Hudson all performed at a campaign event in Los Angeles.  Dave Matthews performed at an Obama rally in Bristow, Virginia and also in Aurora, Colorado.  In North Carolina, James Taylor undertook an eight-show tour on behalf of Obama, and Pearl Jam’s Eddie Vedder appeared at a $20,000-per-ticket fund-raiser in Tampa, Florida.

Actor Morgan Freeman was among five celebrity donors who each contributed one million dollars to support the Obama campaign.
Actor Morgan Freeman was among five celebrity donors who each contributed one million dollars to support the Obama campaign.
     Beyond the musicians and high-profile endorsers at campaign rallies there was also the matter of campaign money.  Lots of celebrities from Hollywood and the broader entertainment industry gave generously to the Obama campaign and related Political Action Committees (PACs).  According to a review of federal election documents by OpenSecrets.org, run by the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics, more than 200 celebrities donated a total of some $712,000 to Obama’s re-election bid in the 2012 campaign cycle.  Among these donors were, for example: Tom Hanks, Magic Johnson, Ben Stiller, Eva Longoria, Will Smith, Scarlett Johansson, Barbara Streisand, Aaron Sorkin, Steven Spielberg, Gwen Stefani, Quentin Tarantino, Melanie Griffith, Quincy Jones, Cameron Crowe, Don Henley, Ellen DeGeneres, Nancy Sinatra, Jack Black, Jamie Foxx, Randy Newman, Jennifer Garner, Leonardo DiCaprio, Robert Downey Jr., Mariska Hargitay, Jamie Lee Curtis, Marlo Thomas, John Legend, Emmylou Harris, Sam Waterston, and others.  Another 90 or so celebrities donated to DNC Services Corp., the Democratic National Committee.  Five celebrities, including Morgan Freeman and Bill Maher, donated $1 million each to Priorities USA Action, a super PAC supporting Obama.  Among “bundlers” for Obama from Hollywood – those who pull together multiple donations in one bundle – were Jeffrey Katzenberg of DreamWorks Animation, Obama’s top bundler, pulling together some $2.3 million in donations, and Barry and Wendy Meyer of Warner Brothers, bundling $1.9 million.   

Music power couple Beyoncé & Jay-Z, shown here at a New Jersey Nets basketball game, hosted a special fundraiser for Obama in New York in Sept 2012.
Music power couple Beyoncé & Jay-Z, shown here at a New Jersey Nets basketball game, hosted a special fundraiser for Obama in New York in Sept 2012.
     Actor George Clooney hosted a fundraiser at his Los Angeles home in May 2012 that Obama attended which raised over $15 million.  In August, the president attended a fundraiser on Long Island, New York hosted by movie mogul Harvey Weinstein, actress Anne Hathaway, Vogue editor Anna Wintour, and filmmaker Aaron Sorkin.  Actresses Julianne Moore and Sarah Jessica Parker also hosted separate fundraisers for the president in 2012.  In September, Jay-Z and Beyoncé hosted a $40,000-per-seat Manhattan fundraiser for the president at Jay-Z’s 40/40 club.  Jay-Z also released a campaign video for Obama in October, and as noted above, campaigned with Bruce Springsteen and the president in Columbus, Ohio.  Other celebrities made pro-Obama videos that circulated on the web, including Will Ferrell, Cher, and Kathy Griffin.  Morgan Freeman narrated a pro-Obama campaign ad.  Still, this is not a full accounting of all the campaign assistance the Obama effort received from actors, musicians, playwrights, professional athletes, and other celebrities.

Actor Jon Voight – known for his roles in films such as “Midnight Cowboy” (1969), “Coming Home” (1978), and “Mission Impossible” (1996) – supported Mitt Romney.
Actor Jon Voight – known for his roles in films such as “Midnight Cowboy” (1969), “Coming Home” (1978), and “Mission Impossible” (1996) – supported Mitt Romney.
     Romney and the Republicans had their share of celebrities too.  Detroit musician Kid Rock performed at Romney rallies and the Romney campaign used Rock’s “Born Free” song as one of its regular campaign anthems for much of 2012.  Randy Owen, the lead singer of the group Alabama, and Johnny Van Zant, frontman for Lynyrd Skynyrd, also endorsed Romney, as did country music star Trace Adkins, who performed at campaign rallies for Romney.  John Elway, former quarterback for the Denver Broncos, endorsed Romney in Colorado a few days before the first debate.  Donnie and Marie Osmond were Romney supporters, as was Gene Simmons of the rock group Kiss.  Actors Jon Voight, Kelsey Grammar, Robert Duvall, Check Norris and Jeff Foxworthy endorsed Romney too, as did Clint Eastwood, famously, at the Republican National Convention. Obama out-raised Romney by nearly 5-to-1 among donors from the “TV/ movies/music” segment.  Cindy Crawford appeared in a video on behalf of Romney, and comedian Dennis Miller and former pro golfer Jack Nicklaus also endorsed the Republican candidate.

     But in terms of celebrity campaign donations, Romney had a relatively small share of the Hollywood/ music industry money pot, receiving some $46,500 from donors including: playwright Neil Simon, Olympic figure skater Kristi Yamaguchi, actor Orson Bean, producer Jerry Bruckheimer, professional football player Peyton Manning, and World Wrestling Entertainment CEO Vince McMahon and his wife, Linda, a Republican candidate herself, then running for the U.S. Senate seat in Connecticut being vacated by retiring Sen. Joe Lieberman.  The McMahons were also among those donating to Restore Our Future, a conservative super PAC backing Romney’s bid.  And the Republican National Committee picked up $78,886 from celebrity donors who included the McMahons, Jerry Bruckheimer, singer Pat Boone, New York Yankee baseball star, Alex Rodriguez, and others.  But over the 2010-2012 election cycle, according to one count, Obama out-raised Romney by nearly a 5-to-1 margin among donors from the “TV/ movies/music” segment, receiving roughly $4.5 million in donations from that group compared to something under $1 million for the Romney campaign.


Springsteen Stood Out

November 6, 2012 election-day edition of the Wilmington,  Delaware “News Journal” newspaper, also ran the Obama-Springsteen photo on its front page.
November 6, 2012 election-day edition of the Wilmington, Delaware “News Journal” newspaper, also ran the Obama-Springsteen photo on its front page.
     But Bruce Springsteen, because of his following in the swing-state and rust-belt Midwest – and also among working-class voters broadly – appears to have played a more-than-normal celebrity role in the final weeks of the 2012 election.  And perhaps for that reason alone, his front-page notice in the Washington Post and a few other newspapers on election day was right on target.  But Springsteen has also shown himself to be one of the more thoughtful celebrities when he does become involved in political campaigning, not entering the fray lightly.  In 2004, when he decided to take up the cause for John Kerry, he wrote an Op-Ed piece in the New York Times explaining his views on the candidate.  And he has also used his website to post longer statements explaining his political views and the backing of particular candidates.  But for most of his fans – Democrat, Republican, or Independent – his message is already transparent in his music, which normally conveys a determined, though sometimes angry but usually hopeful, American patriotism.

     For other stories at this website with content related to Bruce Springsteen see, for example: “Steinbeck to Springsteen,” “Springsteen & Reagan,” and “Streets of Philadelphia.”  Additional story choices on politics can be found at the “Politics & Society” category page.

     Thanks for visiting. – Jack Doyle

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Date Posted: 14 December 2012
Last Update: 14 December 2012
Comments to: jdoyle@pophistorydig.com

Article Citation:
Jack Doyle, “Barack & Bruce, 2008-2012,”
PopHistoryDig.com, December 14, 2012.

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Sources, Links & Additional Information

Of his ride on Air Force One with President Obama in Nov 2012, Bruce Springsteen rated the experience as “pretty cool” – here with wife, Patti Scialfa.
Of his ride on Air Force One with President Obama in Nov 2012, Bruce Springsteen rated the experience as “pretty cool” – here with wife, Patti Scialfa.
Bruce Springsteen sharing a joke with audience at Des Moines, Iowa rally about late-night Obama phone calls.
Bruce Springsteen sharing a joke with audience at Des Moines, Iowa rally about late-night Obama phone calls.
Bruce Springsteen greeting First Lady Michelle Obama at campaign rally in Des Moines, Iowa, Nov. 5, 2012.
Bruce Springsteen greeting First Lady Michelle Obama at campaign rally in Des Moines, Iowa, Nov. 5, 2012.
August 5, 2002: Bruce Springsteen on Time magazine cover with a feature story that includes “an intimate look at how Springsteen turned 9/11 into a message of hope.”
August 5, 2002: Bruce Springsteen on Time magazine cover with a feature story that includes “an intimate look at how Springsteen turned 9/11 into a message of hope.”
Bruce Springsteen and other Kennedy Center honorees being lauded by President Obama & First Lady Michelle Obama in President’s box, Kennedy Center, Washington, D.C., December 2009.
Bruce Springsteen and other Kennedy Center honorees being lauded by President Obama & First Lady Michelle Obama in President’s box, Kennedy Center, Washington, D.C., December 2009.
October 2004: Presidential candidate John Kerry with Bruce Springsteen at campaign rally in Madison, Wisconsin. Photo, Mike DeVries /Capital Times.
October 2004: Presidential candidate John Kerry with Bruce Springsteen at campaign rally in Madison, Wisconsin. Photo, Mike DeVries /Capital Times.
October 2008: Portion of invitation to Billy Joel/Bruce Springsteen special concert & Obama fundraiser hosted  by Harvey Weinstein, Anna Wintour & others.
October 2008: Portion of invitation to Billy Joel/Bruce Springsteen special concert & Obama fundraiser hosted by Harvey Weinstein, Anna Wintour & others.
Stevie Wonder with President Obama at the White House.  Wonder performed at Obama campaign rallies in 2008 & 2012 and at the president’s 2009 inauguration.
Stevie Wonder with President Obama at the White House. Wonder performed at Obama campaign rallies in 2008 & 2012 and at the president’s 2009 inauguration.
Nov 2012: Poster advertising Obama rally with former President Bill Clinton and musician Dave Matthews.
Nov 2012: Poster advertising Obama rally with former President Bill Clinton and musician Dave Matthews.
Katy Perry performing at October 2012 Obama rally in Las Vegas wearing her latex “election ballot” dress –  with the Obama-Biden box filled in.
Katy Perry performing at October 2012 Obama rally in Las Vegas wearing her latex “election ballot” dress – with the Obama-Biden box filled in.
John Mellencamp performed at Obama and Vice President Joe Biden campaign rallies in 2008 and 2012.
John Mellencamp performed at Obama and Vice President Joe Biden campaign rallies in 2008 and 2012.
Notice posted on the internet about Jay-Z performing at Obama campaign rally in Columbus, OH, 5 Nov 2012.
Notice posted on the internet about Jay-Z performing at Obama campaign rally in Columbus, OH, 5 Nov 2012.
Rapper and music mogul Jay-Z performing at Obama campaign rally in Columbus, Ohio, 5 November 2012.
Rapper and music mogul Jay-Z performing at Obama campaign rally in Columbus, Ohio, 5 November 2012.
On-line notice about Bruce Springsteen appearance for Obama in Madison, WI, November 5, 2012.
On-line notice about Bruce Springsteen appearance for Obama in Madison, WI, November 5, 2012.

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________________________________



 




“1968 Presidential Race”
Republicans

Richard Nixon, center, is flanked by Dan Rowan, left, and Dick Martin right, of ‘Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In’ TV show at October 1968 campaign stop in Burbank, CA.  Nixon appeared on  ‘Laugh-In’ in mid-Sept 1968 in the humorous 'sock-it-to-me' segment, covered later below.  (AP photo)
Richard Nixon, center, is flanked by Dan Rowan, left, and Dick Martin right, of ‘Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In’ TV show at October 1968 campaign stop in Burbank, CA. Nixon appeared on ‘Laugh-In’ in mid-Sept 1968 in the humorous 'sock-it-to-me' segment, covered later below. (AP photo)
     In the 1968 presidential race, Hollywood and celebrity involvement in politics reached a level not seen in several decades.  The participation of movie stars, singers, directors, authors, sports figures, and other celebrities in the election was more prominent among Democrats perhaps, but was also a factor on the Republican side.  Historically, Republicans were more suspicious of liberal-leaning Hollywood than Demo- crats.  And Hollywood itself, especially after the communist witch hunts of the late 1940s and 1950s, was leery of politics generally. 

     “People in Hollywood are generally afraid to be active in politics,” said actor Dick Powell in September 1960.  “This is especially true of some in television who believe that their sponsors would not want them to be identified with a political party.”  Another actor, Vincent Price, added in the same 1960 interview: “Here in Hollywood, actors are not supposed to have political opinions.”  But many did, of course.  Dick Powell, for example, was then, in September 1960, heading up a group of Hollywood Republicans supporting the Richard Nixon-Henry Cabot Lodge ticket then bidding for the White House.  But by the early 1960s, and in 1968 in particular, celebrity involvement in politics would become much more prominent.

Ronald & Nancy Reagan at victory party after winning the 1966 California governor's race.
Ronald & Nancy Reagan at victory party after winning the 1966 California governor's race.
     In fact, by the mid-1960s, Republican actors began running for, and winning, public office.  Actor/dancer George Murphy was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1964, and actor Ronald Reagan won the California Governor’s race in 1966.  Murphy was a film actor who danced with Shirley Temple in the 1938 film Little Miss Broadway and acted opposite Judy Garland in Little Nellie Kelly (1940).  Murphy became active in California politics in the 1950s and had served as director of entertainment for Dwight Eisenhower’s presidential inaugurations of 1953 and 1957.  By 1964, Murphy became a politician himself, winning a California U.S. Senate seat.

     Ronald Reagan had been movie actor in the 1930s and 1940s, appearing in variety of films, and also became a familiar 1950s TV host for the popular “General Electric Theater.”  Reagan’s second wife, Nancy, had also appeared in Hollywood films.  In addition to Reagan and Murphy winning office, one of Hollywood’s most notable childhood stars from the 1940s, Shirley Temple, ran for an open seat in Congress in 1967, but did not win.  Still, by the time of the 1968 presidential election, with Ronald Reagan as California’s governor and George Murphy in the U.S. Senate, Hollywood and its celebrities were clearly a presence in Republican politics.  But among the candidates for the Republican presidential nomination that year, was the very un-Hollywood former Vice-President, Richard M. Nixon.

 

Three to Tango ipod

Nixon’s Rise 

Nixon cheering himself over election returns in 1950 in defeat of Democrat Helen Gahagan-Douglas in U.S. Senate race.
Nixon cheering himself over election returns in 1950 in defeat of Democrat Helen Gahagan-Douglas in U.S. Senate race.
     Richard Nixon had grown up in the shadow of Hollywood, but was certainly not a Hollywood type himself or inclined toward its culture or lifestyle.  Still, throughout his political career, Nixon would find a measure of star power in his campaigns, with various celebrities and studio executives supporting him.  Yet in his early career, Nixon would probe Hollywood as a Congressman hunting communists, and in 1950 he would launch a Senate bid opposing former Hollywood actress, Helen Gahagan-Douglas.

     Nixon first made his way onto the national scene in 1946, elected as a Congressman from California.  In Washington he quickly made a career for himself in the late 1940s as a member of the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC), which pursued alleged communists in government and in Hollywood.  Although Nixon became known for his role in the Alger Hiss case  — a State Department official accused of being a Soviet spy – he also helped HUAC query Hollywood actors and executives suspected of communist activities or lacking in their loyalties.  In 1947 hearings, for example, he asked Jack Warner of Warner Brothers, “How many anti-communist movies have you made?” 

George Murphy, shown here with Shirley Temple in 1938, helped Richard Nixon in his bid for the White House in 1960, and became a U.S. Senator himself in 1964.
George Murphy, shown here with Shirley Temple in 1938, helped Richard Nixon in his bid for the White House in 1960, and became a U.S. Senator himself in 1964.
     In 1950, Nixon ran for a U.S. Senate seat from California, opposing Democrat Helen Gahagan Douglas.  Douglas was a 1920s Broadway actress who starred in the 1935 movie She.  Elected to Congress in 1944, Douglas served three terms in the U.S. House as a liberal New Dealer.  She was married to a former actor, Melvyn Douglas, later a Hollywood executive and also among “suspect  liberals.”  During Nixon’s Senate campaign with Gahagan-Douglas, he cited her alleged “Communist-leaning” votes in Congress.  On the campaign trail he called her “the Pink Lady” (“pinko” being short slang for communist), saying at one point she was “pink right down to her underwear.”  Nixon won the election, but many felt he had run a smear campaign against Douglas.

     As a young Congressman and then a Senator, Nixon rose quickly in the Republican party, becoming Dwight D. Eisenhower’s vice-presidential running mate in 1952 (though Nixon did have one brush with controversy that year nearly costing him his career; see “Nixon’s Checker’s Speech”).  The Eisenhower/ Nixon ticket, in any case,  won two successive terms  — 1952 and 1956.  But when Nixon ran for President in 1960, opposing John F. Kennedy, he lost.  Then in 1962, he tried to become California’s Governor and lost again, this time to Democrat Pat Brown.  In each of these elections, from the early 1950s, there was always some contingent of Hollywood – both actors and studios – supporting Nixon and/or the Eisenhower/Nixon ticket.  Nixon first met entertainer Bob Hope in the 1950s when Nixon was Vice President.   Hope would become a friend and supporter thereafter.  In 1960, when Nixon ran for the White House, Hollywood stars George Murphy and Helen Hayes formed a “Celebrities for Nixon Committee.”

Nixon had met Bob Hope in the 1950s when he was Vice President with Eisenhower.  Hope became a Nixon supporter, and is shown here in September 1969 with President Nixon in the Oval Office.
Nixon had met Bob Hope in the 1950s when he was Vice President with Eisenhower. Hope became a Nixon supporter, and is shown here in September 1969 with President Nixon in the Oval Office.
     Another Hollywood supporter helping Nixon in 1960 was Mervyn LeRoy, a film director and producer.  In the 1930s LeRoy directed Edward G. Robinson in Little Caesar (1931) and as head of production at MGM in 1938, produced The Wizard of Oz.  Involved in advancing the careers of Clark Gable, Loretta Young, Robert Mitchum and Lana Turner, LeRoy also produced musicals in the 1950s and a series of hits for Warner Brothers such as Mister Roberts, The Bad Seed, No Time for Sergeants, The FBI Story and Gypsy.  In August 1960, LeRoy was heading up a drive in Hollywood to recruit others for Nixon.  In addition to LeRoy, George Murphy, and Helen Hayes, the 1960 Nixon/Lodge ticket also had other Hollywood backers, including: Jimmy Stewart, Gary Cooper, Rosalind Russell, Robert Montgomery, Robert Cummings, Robert Taylor, Irene Dunn, Cesar Romero and Mary Pickford.  Again in 1962, when Nixon ran for Governor of California,  he found a similar roster of Hollywood supporters – among them, Jimmy Stewart, Red Skelton, Rosalind Russell, Dick Powell, June Allyson, Robert Young, Tony Martin, Cyd Charisse, Irene Dunn, Johnny Mathis, Louise Beavers, and Efrem Zimbalist, Jr.

Nixon on Jack Paar TV show, believed to be March of 1963.  Parr is holding Nixon’s book, ‘Six Crises,’ published in 1962.
Nixon on Jack Paar TV show, believed to be March of 1963. Parr is holding Nixon’s book, ‘Six Crises,’ published in 1962.
     But after Nixon lost badly to Pat Brown in the 1962 California Governor’s race – by nearly 300,000 votes – he charged that the media had showed favoritism to Brown.  Many pundits at the time thought Nixon was finished as a politician, especially since he declared the day after his loss: “You won’t have Nixon to kick around anymore because, gentlemen, this is my last press conference.”  But several months later, Nixon appeared on The Jack Paar Program, (a talk show similar to that of today’s David Letterman or Jay Leno ) leaving the door open to his political future.

     And sure enough, by the mid-1960s, Richard Nixon was rising from the ashes of his prior losses, on his way to one of the biggest political comebacks in American history.  Nixon joined a New York law firm after his California gubernatorial defeat, and from there laid the groundwork for his return.  He campaigned vigorously for Republicans in the 1966 Congressional elections, providing a key base of indebted members.  Republicans added 47 House seats in that election, three in the Senate, and eight governorships.  Nixon was also traveling and advancing his ideas on national politics and international affairs among Republican insiders.  So it was no surprise to party regulars in January 1968, when he formally announced his candidacy for the Republican presidential nomination.

 

Romney, Rocky & Reagan

In some 1967 polling, Michigan Governor George Romney, a former auto company executive, led Nixon among moderates.
In some 1967 polling, Michigan Governor George Romney, a former auto company executive, led Nixon among moderates.
     Nixon’s initial challenger for the Republican nomination was Gov. George Romney of Michigan, father of Mitt Romney, the recent Republican presidential candidate of 2008.  George Romney was a successful business leader at the American Motors car company from 1954 to 1962, maker of one of the early compact cars named the Rambler.  He became Governor of Michigan from 1963 to 1969.  Romney formally entered the race for the Republican presidential nomination in late November 1967, saying, “A Republican president can work for a just peace in Vietnam unshackled by the mistakes of the past.”  Although Romney led Nixon among moderates in very early polls, he soon met with political misfortune.  Romney had initially supported the war in Vietnam, but later moderated his position after making a fact-finding visit there in 1965.  “I no longer believe that it was necessary for us to get involved in South Vietnam to stop Communist aggression in Southeast Asia,” he explained at one point, urging “a sound peace in South Vietnam at an early time.”  This was a sharp reversal from his earlier belief that the war was “morally right and necessary.”  However, in making his reversal on the war, Romney explained during one interview of being misled by military officials, using the term “brainwashed,” which would turn out to be an unfortunate choice of words that eventually undid his presidential bid.  By February 1968, less than two weeks before the New Hampshire primary, Romney pulled out of the race.

Nelson Rockefeller, shown on Time’s Aug 1960 cover, had previously battled Nixon for the nomination and lost.
Nelson Rockefeller, shown on Time’s Aug 1960 cover, had previously battled Nixon for the nomination and lost.
     Nelson Rockefeller, governor of New York, became the heir apparent to moderate and anti-war Republicans after Romney went down.  A descendant of the Rockefeller oil fortune, Rockefeller had been New York’s governor since 1959.  He had also run for the Republican presidential nomination twice before – once in 1960 losing to Nixon, and agin in 1964 losing to conservative Arizona Senator Barry Goldwater. 

     In the first primary of 1968 – New Hampshire on March 12th, now without Romney – Nixon took 78 percent of the vote.  Republicans wrote in the name of then yet-to-announce Rockefeller, who received 11 percent of the vote.  Rockefeller became something of a reluctant candidate, but allowed party members and others to work on his behalf.  And eventually, Rockefeller did get into campaign mode, putting forward a plan to disengage from Vietnam and also offering some novel Republican strategies to address urban problems.  But throughout the 1968 primary season, Nixon generally led Rockefeller in the polls, although Rockefeller won the April 30th Massachusetts primary.

Ronald Reagan and Nancy Davis star in 1957's ‘Hellcats of the Navy,’ by Columbia Pictures.
Ronald Reagan and Nancy Davis star in 1957's ‘Hellcats of the Navy,’ by Columbia Pictures.
     The other Republican candidate then on the horizon, and a potential problem for Nixon, was filmstar-turned-politician Ronald Reagan.  Even before he became California’s Governor in 1966, Reagan had begun to attract a national following, especially among conservatives.  He had given an important, televised speech supporting Barry Goldwater for President in 1964 which had marked him as a rising star. 

     By 1968, with support from conservatives, Reagan emerged as Nixon’s chief rival in the Nebraska presidential primary of May 14th.  Still, Nixon took 70 percent of the vote there to 21 percent for Reagan, and 5 percent for Rockefeller.  Nixon continued to win the primaries, with the exception of California, which he conceded to Reagan — a primary in which only Reagan’s name appeared on the ballot. 

     Reagan’s large margin in California, however, gave him a narrow lead in the nationwide primary popular vote – Reagan had 1,696,632 votes or 37.93% compared to Nixon’s 1,679,443 votes or 37.54%.  Some believe that if Reagan had made a committed run for the nomination, and had mounted a serious campaign earlier, he could have beat Nixon.  Still, by the time the Republican National Convention assembled in August 1968, Nixon had 656 delegates, needing only 11 more to reach the nomination at 667.

 

Celebrities for Nixon

Nixon shown here with Rudy Vallee in the 1960s.  Vallee had been a well known radio and Hollywood film star of the 1930s & 1940s.
Nixon shown here with Rudy Vallee in the 1960s. Vallee had been a well known radio and Hollywood film star of the 1930s & 1940s.
      Ronald Reagan, of course, was Hollywood personified, and with wife Nancy Davis who had also been an actress, they were well-connected throughout Hollywood.  But Richard Nixon had his own Hollywood connections, reaching back to the older network of stars who had supported his earlier campaigns.  Nixon’s Hollywood stars, however, were somewhat older than those on the Democratic side in 1968. Nixon’s group included stars who had reached their peak in earlier years, such as Ray Bolger and Rudy Vallee, for example – but stars, nonetheless, who still had a following.  “I have been making speeches for the Republicans, trying to create more party unity,” explained Ray Bolger to a reporter in April 1968.  “They sought me out, but I happen to be very fond of Dick [Nixon] and think he’s very able.  I’ve played golf with him.”  Rudy Vallee was also quoted at the time saying that Nixon was “the most qualified man in this country, intellectually and emotionally.”  Nixon’s campaign would also recruit other TV entertainers, athletes, and singers to help in his 1968 presidential bid.  Among these stars, for example, were: Pat Boone, Connie Francis, Jackie Gleason, Hugh O’Brian, Ginger Rogers, and last but not least, John Wayne.

John Wayne’s movie, ‘The Green Berets', was released in July 1968.
John Wayne’s movie, ‘The Green Berets', was released in July 1968.
     Wayne had backed Nixon over Kennedy in the 1960 presidential race, and in 1968 he was backing Nixon again.  Wayne liked Nixon for his anti-communist stance.  A supporter of the Vietnam War, Wayne was a critic of Lyndon Johnson’s handling of the War.  Wayne had made a popular war movie at the time that used Vietnam – a very patriotic film called The Green Berets (June-July 1968).  The film had a premier in Atlanta, Georgia on June 25, 1968, which coincided with that city’s “Salute To America” celebration.  Wayne served as grand marshal in the parade, and the overall event attracted some 300,000 people.  The Green Berets film, meanwhile, was cheered in the south, but protested in northern cities and university towns.  Nixon’s campaign staff had noted Wayne’s appeal to blue collar voters and a certain segment of the white southern vote.  One of Nixon’s campaign aides at the time, Kevin Philips, explained Wayne’s appeal to a segment of voters Nixon needed: “Wayne might sound bad to people in New York,” he said, “but he sounds great to the schmucks we’re trying to reach through John Wayne — the people down there along the Yahoo Belt.  If I had time I’d check to see in what areas The Green Berets was held over [in theaters], and I’d play a special series of John Wayne [Nixon campaign] spots wherever it was.”  Wayne was also scheduled to speak at the Republican Convention in Miami that August.
Green Bay Packer quarterback Bart Starr – shown on a ‘Sport Illustrated’ Jan 1967 cover – was a Nixon supporter in 1968.
Green Bay Packer quarterback Bart Starr – shown on a ‘Sport Illustrated’ Jan 1967 cover – was a Nixon supporter in 1968.

     Among other Nixon supporters were famous athletes, including, former heavyweight boxing champ Joe Louis, Los Angeles Lakers basketball star Wilt Chamberlain, and Green Bay Packer quarterback Bart Starr.  Joe Louis was long retired from the boxing ring by then, but his name was still well known to sports enthusiasts.  Bart Starr was probably the most famous professional football player in the country at the time.  He had led the Packers to NFL Championships in 1961, 1962, 1965, 1966, and 1967.  In 1966 and 1967, he also led the Packers to convincing victories in the first two Super Bowls and was named the Most Valuable Player of both games.  Pro basketball player Wilt Chamberlain  — the LeBron James and Shaqueal O’Neill of his day – was nearly ten years into his career by then, and had played for the Harlem Globetrotters, the Philadelphia/San Francisco Warriors, and Philadelphia 76ers.  He would help Nixon reach out to the black community and tout Nixon’s ideas on “black capitalism.”

Tex Ritter, who sang the famous 1952 movie song, ‘Do Not Forsake Me Oh, My Darlin’, was a Nixon supporter in 1968.
Tex Ritter, who sang the famous 1952 movie song, ‘Do Not Forsake Me Oh, My Darlin’, was a Nixon supporter in 1968.
     Another Nixon sup- porter in 1968 was Tex Ritter, a singing cowboy who began a radio career in the late 1920s, and also had success with stints in radio, film, Broadway, and recording.  Ritter, father of the late actor John Ritter, was also known for singing the famous High Noon film song of 1952, “Do Not Forsake Me Oh My Darlin.”  It won an Academy award for Best Song of the year and also became a popular hit.  Ritter sang the High Noon song at the Academy Awards ceremony in 1953, the first to be televised.  By 1968, Ritter had also become quite active in Republican politics, supporting the runs of various candidates including, John Tower of Texas, Howard Baker of Tennessee, George Murphy of California, Barry Goldwater of Arizona, and Ronald Reagan in California.  A personal friend of Nixon’s, Ritter also wrote a campaign song for Nixon in 1968.  On one occasion when Ritter was on tour in Germany, Nixon arranged for a plane to meet Ritter and his wife so that Ritter could entertain a political gathering being held for Nixon in Nashville, Tennessee where nearly 25,000 supporters were gathered.  Nixon would also garner the support from Roy Ackuff of the Grand Ole Oprey.
Republican convention in Miami, August 1972, where Nixon was nominated on the first ballot.
Republican convention in Miami, August 1972, where Nixon was nominated on the first ballot.

 

Miami Convention

     On August 5, 1968 at the opening of Republican National Convention, Miami Beach Convention Center in Miami Beach, Florida, there were mini-skirted Rockefeller girls, Nixon men on stilts costumed as Uncle Sam, and live elephants out in the street.  Celebrities such as Hugh O’Brien and John Wayne were on hand too.  On the first morning of the convention, delegates cheered enthusiastically as John Wayne spoke.  Nelson Rockefeller, technically still in the running at that point, had his celebrities, too – among them, Kitty Carlisle, Teresa Wright, Nancy Ames, Hildegarde, and singer Billy Daniels.  On the evening of August 7th, 1968, an estimated guest list of some 8,000 were wined and dined at a Nelson Rockefeller reception.  Lionel Hampton’s band provided music, and among the guests were hundreds of celebrities.

John Wayne adressing convention.
John Wayne adressing convention.
     During the main business of the convention, however, Nixon was nominated on the first ballot with 692 votes.  Rockefeller was second at 277, and Reagan third at 182.  For vice president, House Minority Leader Gerald Ford proposed New York City Mayor John Lindsay.  However, Nixon turned to Maryland Governor Spiro Agnew as his running mate.  After Nixon received the nomination, celebrities who had lined up for the other candidates shifted their support to Nixon.  By September 1968, “Celebrities for Nixon-Agnew,” had more than 100 famous names on its roster, among them, Rory Calhoun, Ray Milland, Art Linkletter, Guy Lombardo, and Connie Francis.  Three weeks later, the Democrats convened their national convention in Chicago, nominating Vice President Hubert Humphrey and U.S. Senator Ed Muskie from Maine (see companion piece on the Democrats).

Ronald Reagan threw his full support to Nixon at the 1968 convention.
Ronald Reagan threw his full support to Nixon at the 1968 convention.
     The Democrats’ gathering in Chicago had been quite messy and divisive, with fighting over the Vietnam War and clashes in the streets between police and demonstrators, all televised to a national audience.  Nixon and his campaign capitalized on the Democrats’ misfortune by staging a massive campaign appearance in Chicago that fall, with Nixon’s “law and order” speeches blending imagery of the Democrat’s convention violence along with the general unrest in the country that year.  This “law and order” theme, coupled with his courting of the “law-abiding” middle class, was used heavily in political campaign ads that fall.

Nixon campaigning in the Philadelphia, PA area, July 1968.
Nixon campaigning in the Philadelphia, PA area, July 1968.
     In May 1968, Nixon had given a radio speech that focused on the “silent center” of American voters — “the millions of people in the middle spectrum who do not demonstrate, who do not picket or protest loudly” – but were at the heart of America.  Nixon courted this constituency and refined his message in the fall calling these Americans the “silent majority”.  The core of the idea, according to Nixon speechwriters, was found in a 1948 book by historian Arthur Schlessinger, Jr., called The Vital Center.  But Nixon made it his own during the campaign, hitting the theme time and time again, at the convention and throughout the fall of 1968.  Nixon claimed to speak for this majority of law-abiding citizens; citizens who felt in 1968 they were being blamed for the social problems of the day; citizens the liberals “talked down to.”  Amidst the growing social upheaval, Nixon appealed to these voters, promising a return to the stability of the Eisenhower years.

 

The Celebrity Preacher

     Another prominent American who had the ear of the middle America, and was also a supporter of Richard Nixon in 1968, was evangelist Billy Graham.  Graham was a very popular religious leader with a huge following.  A long-time friend of Nixon’s, Graham had prominently supported Nixon over Kennedy in the 1960 presidential election.  In the 1950s, he had also supported Eisenhower.  When Nixon was Vice President, Graham arranged for Nixon to address major gatherings of Methodists, Presbyterians, among others, and wrote at least one speech for him, according to Garry Wills.Billy Graham’s huge popu- larity in the south was  seen as especially helpful to Nixon’s “Southern strategy.”  “Graham worked closely with Nixon in the 1968 campaign, advised him on relations with the Evangelical community, and vouched for him in that community,” explains Wills in his book Head and Heart: American Christianities.  Graham’s huge popularity in the south, in particular, was regarded as especially helpful to Nixon’s “Southern strategy” in 1968, a bid to appeal to conservative white Democrats in southern states, many still fearful of racial desegregation.  Although Graham had desegregated his own religious activities in the South during the 1950s, he denounced civil rights agitators in the 1960s.  His endorsement of “law and order” fit nicely with Nixon’s plan to attract Southern whites to the Republican side by denouncing liberal activists.

Billy Graham & Richard Nixon, 1970.
Billy Graham & Richard Nixon, 1970.
     Graham also rose publicly to Nixon’s defense during the fall election campaign after Humphrey supporter George W. Ball, a former ambassador to the Unite Nations, had made a negative comment about Nixon’s character.  “Mr Ball reflected on Mr. Nixon’s character and personal integrity,” said Graham to reporters in September 1968.  “I have known Richard Nixon intimately for more than 20 years.  I can testify that he is a man of high moral principle.”  Ball had said he thought Nixon a man “more interested in public opinion polls that principles.”  Ball said he found “no pattern in Mr. Nixon’s life.  He is a man who is one thing one day, and another the next”.  Billy Graham was also advising Nixon when he chose Spiro Agnew as his vice president at the Republican convention, although Graham had favored Sen. Mark Hatfield of Oregon, an active Christian.  At one of his crusade services in Pittsburgh shortly before the 1968 election, Graham accorded Nixon a place of prominence and praised Nixon “effusively,” according to author Michael G. Long in his book, The Legacy of Billy Graham.

 

Connie & Jackie

Popular singer Connie Francis, shown here on an album cover, made a TV ad for Nixon in 1968.
Popular singer Connie Francis, shown here on an album cover, made a TV ad for Nixon in 1968.
     Nixon also enlisted singing artists and television personalities to offer public endorsements or do campaign ads.  In September 1968, the Nixon campaign made a TV commercial with singer and movie actress Connie Francis.  Francis was then a popular singer and had a large following.  Among her hit songs in the 1950s and early 1960s were: “Who’s Sorry Now”(#4, 1958), “Everybody’s Somebody’s Fool”(#1, 1960), “Don’t Break the Heart That Loves You”(#1 1962), and others.  She had also appeared in few films, such as Where The Boys Are and Follow The Boys (1963).  In the late 1960s, Francis had a number of albums on the market and was also appearing on TV shows and performed for audiences abroad as well.  In her appearance in the Nixon campaign ad, Francis commented on finding disrespect for America in her travels abroad, while also noting a deplorable lack of respect for authority at home.  In the ad, Francis said Nixon would set things right if elected president.  The spot ran during the popular Laugh-In TV show.  New York Times writer Jack Gould, reviewing the Connie Francis ad, said it “embraced all the ills of the oversimplified campaign ad…”
Jackie Gleason, popular in his 1950s ‘Honeymooners’ TV sit-com, shown here in the 1961 film ‘The Hustler.’
Jackie Gleason, popular in his 1950s ‘Honeymooners’ TV sit-com, shown here in the 1961 film ‘The Hustler.’

     In the fall of 1968, Jackie Gleason, the TV entertainer and film actor – making his first endorsement in national politics – threw his support to Richard Nixon.  Gleason was the star of The Jackie Gleason Show and The Honeymooners, both of which were popular TV shows of the 1950s and early 1960s.  Gleason had also made a few movies by then, including The Hustler of 1961, in which he played opposite Paul Newman as pool shark Minnesota Fats. ( Newman had supported Democrat Eugene McCarthy).  Gleason in 1968 was still a popular celebrity and had a following throughout the country. 

     In the fall campaign, Gleason kicked off a one-hour long televised rally for Nixon from New York’s Madison Square Garden on October 31, 1968.  He introduced the hour with his personal endorsement of Nixon, stating on the tape it was his first ever political endorsement as he made his appeal to voters. 

     On the tape, after a narrator introduces Gleason – who is dressed in a dapper suit with a carnation in his lapel – he makes his pitch:

Nixon with Jackie Gleason on golf course.
Nixon with Jackie Gleason on golf course.

     “I love this country.  It’s been good to me – beyond my wildest dreams.  And because I love America so much, lately I’ve been concerned.  Like a lot of you, I’m concerned about where American is going in the next four years.  That’s why I’ve decided to speak up for Richard Nixon.  He sees it like it is.  And he tells it like its is.  I’ve never made a public choice like this before.  But I think our country needs Dick Nixon –  and we need him now.  I think we’ll all feel a lot safer with him in the White House.
     In the next hour, you’re going to see him, hear him speak.  Listen to him.  Make up your own mind.  Never mind what everybody else tells you he says.  Listen to him say it, yourself.  And see if you don’t agree with me.  Dick Nixon’s time has come.  We need him.  You and I need him.  America needs him.  The world needs him.  …And so Madison Square Garden, ‘a-wa-a-a-y we go!’.”

Richard Nixon with Jimmy Stewart, Fred MacMurray, and Bob Hope at Burbank, CA Lakeside Golf Club in January 1970.  (AP photo)
Richard Nixon with Jimmy Stewart, Fred MacMurray, and Bob Hope at Burbank, CA Lakeside Golf Club in January 1970. (AP photo)
     Following the election, Nixon and Gleason would continue to have contact with one another, particularly in Florida.  Gleason lived in Florida and Nixon had a compound on Biscayne Bay only miles away, where he would vacation during his presidency.  In addition, both were avid golfers, and Gleason would have Nixon as a guest at some of his later celebrity and charity golf tournaments.  During his Presidential years, Nixon would also play golf with Hollywood celebrities from time to time.

T.V. Strategy

Esquire’s May 1968 cover had some fun with a stock Nixon photo mixed with some cosmetics ad copy. ‘This time he’d better look right,’ said the cover note, alluding to Nixon’s poor showing vs. JFK in 1960.  Nixon did not debate Humphrey in 1968 and held few press conferences.
Esquire’s May 1968 cover had some fun with a stock Nixon photo mixed with some cosmetics ad copy. ‘This time he’d better look right,’ said the cover note, alluding to Nixon’s poor showing vs. JFK in 1960. Nixon did not debate Humphrey in 1968 and held few press conferences.
     Back on the 1968 campaign trail, meanwhile, Nixon and his handlers were careful in how they used television.  Although Nixon disliked the press, and he had fared poorly in his televised debates with John F. Kennedy in 1960, his 1968 campaign made great creative use of television in political advertising.  In addition to celebrities such as Connie Francis and Jackie Gleason pitching for Nixon, there were also some well known and up-and-coming politicians who made political spots supporting Nixon.  Former actor and California governor Ronald Reagan made a Nixon TV ad urging voters not to vote for the third-party candidate (i.e., George Wallace), calling it a “wasted vote.”  Hollywood’s U.S. Senator George Murphy of California also urged voters in a TV ad to elect Nixon, stressing Nixon’s qualifications in world affairs.  And a Congressman named George Bush (i.e., George Bush senior) made a TV ad for Nixon focused on youth and Nixon’s “new answers for the 70s” — stressing Nixon’s “confidence in kids.”  Law and order and crime were also themes in Nixon’s TV ads.  Some played on fear, as in one showing a woman walking down a poorly lighted street while the narrator spoke of a rising crime rate, violence, and assault, and the  need to make streets safe.  Using the “law and order”theme, the campaign also turned out ads that tried to associate Nixon’s opponent, Hubert Humphrey, with social protest, rising crime, and violence in the streets.  One ad showed a smiling Humphrey as images of Vietnam, protests, and the out-of-control Democratic convention rolled by to a Dixieland rendition of “A Hot Time in the Old Town Tonight.”  The spot ran once in prime time but was pulled after Democratic protest.  Nixon meanwhile, mindful of how television hurt him in 1960, refused to debate Humphrey directly and held few press conferences during his campaign.  But he did appear in a series of hour-long TV programs and biographical profiles – programs produced by media consultant Roger Ailes, then in one of his first political jobs (Ailes is today the president of Fox News Channel).  In these controlled settings, Nixon was interviewed by panels of carefully-selected citizens.  He occasionally faced tough questions, but the discussions took place in front of partisan audiences from which the press was excluded.

 

“Sock it To Me”

     Nixon did, however, make one notable TV appearance in the 1968 election; an appearance on one of the more popular TV shows of that day – Laugh-In.  Formally known as Rowan and Martin’s Laugh-In, the comedy and variety show was something like the Saturday Night Live of its day, though more of a fad show.  But it was quite popular among the young.  It offered witty skits and political barbs, and made stars of Goldie Hawn and Lily Tomlin.  But most importantly for advertisers and politicians, Laugh-In had a very good rating, with millions watching.  In mid-September 1968, Nixon broke from his general election campaign to appear on the show and recite the show’s signature catchphrase, “sock it to me,” often done by noted celebrities. Some believe that Nixon’s ‘sock-it-to-me’ appearance on Laugh-In helped him win the election, as it cast the otherwise formal and stodgy Nixon in a few seconds of self-deprecat- ing humor. Nixon’s taped appearance ran on September 16, 1968.  Nixon himself had been reluctant to do the spot, not being a big fan of TV to begin with.  And most of his aides were not very keen on the idea either, and advised against it.  But one of the show’s writers, Paul Keyes, was a friend of Nixon’s, and when Nixon was out in California for a press conference they took a camera and got him aside to do the phrase.  But it wasn’t easy. It took several takes.  Nixon kept saying the phrase in an angry tone.  Finally, Nixon did the line as a question, “Sock it to me?, with emphasis and uptick on the “me.”  That was the version used, and the producer thought it made Nixon look good – so good, in fact, they thought Hubert Humphrey should appear on the show in an equal role.  For Humphrey, they were thinking of using a variation of the phrase – “I’ll sock it to you, Dick” – as if responding to Nixon.  But Humphrey’s handlers thought it would appear undignified, so Humphrey did not appear.  Happily for Nixon, his Laugh-In appearance may have helped him in the election.  Some believe that the brief clip had cast the otherwise formal and stodgy Nixon in a few seconds of self-deprecating humor.  Even Humphrey would later tell the show’s producer that not making the appearance on Laugh-In  might have cost him votes in the election.  Nixon would also make an appearance with Laugh-In’s Dan Rowan and Dick Martin at a campaign stop in Burbank, California in October 1968 (see photo at beginning of story above).

Nixon campaigning in Philadelphia, PA, on Chestnut Street, September 1968. (AP photo).
Nixon campaigning in Philadelphia, PA, on Chestnut Street, September 1968. (AP photo).

 

Nixon Wins

     On election day that November, in one of the closest elections in U.S. history, Nixon beat Humphrey by a slim margin.  Although Nixon took 302 electoral votes to Humphrey’s 191, the popular vote was extremely close: Nixon at 31,375,000 to 31,125,000 for Humphrey, or 43.4 percent to 43.1 percent.  Third party candidate George Wallace was a key factor in the race, taking more votes from Humphrey than Nixon, hurting Humphrey especially in the south and with union and working class voters in the north. Wallace recorded 9.9 million votes, or 13.5 percent of the popular vote, winning five southern states and taking 45 electoral votes.  Democrats retained control of the House and Senate, but the country was now headed in a more conservative direction.

     In his victory, Nixon brought some of his famous friends along with him to celebrate at the inaugural festivities.  And beyond that, a few also made it into the realm of policy and received formal appointments.  Shirley Temple Black was appointed by Nixon to be U. S. Representative to the United Nations.  Other of Nixon’s famous friends became informal advisors and helped set a new cultural and even moral tone in the country. 

Esquire magazine ran a June 1969 cover story on ‘the Nixon style’ featuring his celebrity friends (behind Nixon):  Art Linkletter, Billy Graham, Rudy Vallee & Lawrence Welk.
Esquire magazine ran a June 1969 cover story on ‘the Nixon style’ featuring his celebrity friends (behind Nixon): Art Linkletter, Billy Graham, Rudy Vallee & Lawrence Welk.

     In June 1969, Esquire magazine poked fun at the new “Nixon style” in Washington with a cover story depicting Nixon supporters Lawrence Welk, Rudy Vallee, Billy Graham, and Art Linkletter along with Nixon himself for the story, “Getting Hep to the Nixon Style.”

     Nixon would subsequently win re-election in November 1972, crushing Democrat George McGovern. But the Watergate scandal – which began as a back-pages, police-blotter news story about a bungled break-in at the Democrat’s Washington, D.C. headquarters – was already in motion.  Watergate would soon unravel to become a full-fledged national scandal that would shake the federal government to its core, bringing Nixon to impeachment and then resignation as President in August 1974.  Meanwhile, back in California where Nixon’s career had begun, there were those who remembered the 1940s and 1950s, and proudly sported a popular bumper sticker during the Watergate years that read: “Don’t Blame Me, I Voted for Helen Gahagan-Douglas!”

(Note: See also companion piece on the Democrats in 1968 ).

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Date Posted: 11 March 2009
Last Update: 11 March 2009
Comments to: jdoyle@pophistorydig.com

Article Citation:
Jack Doyle, “1968 Presidential Race, Republicans,”
PopHistoryDig.com, March 11,2009.

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Sources, Links & Additional Information Behind the Mask: The Rise of Leslie Vernon video

Murray Schumach, “Producer Plans Drive for Nixon; Mervyn LeRoy, Heading the G.O.P. Hollywood Push,”New York Times, Tuesday, August 23, 1960, p. 26.

Murray Schumach, “Hollywood Slate; Luminaries Come to the Aid of Their Parties in the Presidential Race,” New York Times, Sunday September 25, 1960, p. X-9.

Murray Schumach, “Hollywood Joins Political Battle; Stars Jump on Bandwagons in Brown-Nixon Contest,” New York Times, Monday, September 17, 1962, p. 37.

“The Brainwashed Candidate,” Time, Friday, September 15, 1967.

Chris Bachelder, “Crashing The Party: The Ill-Fated 1968 Presidential Campaign of Governor George Romney,” Michigan Historical Review, September 22, 2007.

Warren Weaver, “M’Carthy Gets About 40%, Johnson and Nixon on Top in New Hampshire Voting; Rockefeller Lags,” The New York Times, Wednesday, March 13, 1968, p. 1.

Louis Calta, “Entertainers Join Cast of Political Hopefuls; They Get Into Act to Back 3 Candidates for the Presidency,” New York Times, Saturday, April 6, 1968, p. 42.

Associated Press, “Celebrities Endorse Candidates,” Daily Collegian (State College, PA), May 5, 1968.

“NFL Quarterbacks Head Busy Day for Athletes,” The Washington Post, Times-Herald, May 23, 1968, p. C-9.

“Wilt Chamberlain for Nixon,” New York Times, Saturday, June 29, 1968, p. 30.

Tom Wicker, “Nixon Is Nominated on the First Ballot,” New York Times, Thursday, August 8, 1968, p. 1.

“Wilt Chamberlain Will Push ‘Black Capitalism’ Program,” New York Times, Thursday, August 8, 1968, p. 30.

Robert J. Donovan, “GOP Names Nixon on First Ballot,” Los Angeles Times, August 8, 1968, p. 1.

Don Irwin, “Nixon Comeback Had Its Start in Ashes of 1964 GOP Debate, Los Angeles Times, August 8, 1968, p. 1.

“Chamberlain to Aid Nixon’s Slum Program,” Los Angeles Times, August 8, 1968, p.10.

“Nixon Image Defended; Billy Graham Blasts Ball,” St. Petersburg Times, Monday, September 30, 1968, p. 10-A

UPI, “Billy Graham Says Nixon Is Not ‘Tricky’,” The Washington Post, October 1, 1968, p. A-4.

“Nixon Gets Quasi-Psychedelic Plug,” New York Times, Wednesday, October 9, 1968, p. 33.

Thomas J. Foley, “Politicians Take Cue From Show Business; Nixon, Humphrey Both Use Panel Shows, Documentaries in Biggest TV Campaign, Los Angeles Times, October 6, 1968, p. A-16.

For 1968 campaign ads, see Museum of the Moving Image, “The Living Room Candidate: Presidential Campaign Commercials: 1968.”

Gary A. Yoggy (ed.), Back in the Saddle: Essays on Western Film and Television Actors, 1998, McFarland & Company, Inc., 1998, 224pp.

Norman Mailer, Miami and the Siege of Chicago, Weidenfeld and Nicolson,1968.

Garry Wills, Head and Heart: American Christianities, New York: Penguin Group, 2007.

Nancy Gibbs and Michael Duffy, Billy Graham: The Preacher and the Presidents: Billy Graham in the White House, Center Street, 2007.

Seth Dowland, “Judgment Days: Two New Books Find Good and Evil in the Rev. Billy Graham’s Presidential Politics,” Mountain Express, Vol. 14 / Issus 11, October10, 2007.

Cecil Bothwell, The Prince of War, Brave Ulysses Books, 2007.

Ann Heppermann & Kara Oehler, “This Weekend in 1968: Political Plays to the Silent Center,” American Public Radio, May 17, 2008.

“The Presidents Series: Richard M. Nixon,” American Experience, PBS/WGBH, 2002-2003.

 

1968 Presidential Race
Democrats

Paul Newman, one of many notable Hollywood stars who became active on behalf of presidential candidates during 1968's primary & general elections. Life magazine, May 10, 1968.
Paul Newman, one of many notable Hollywood stars who became active on behalf of presidential candidates during 1968's primary & general elections. Life magazine, May 10, 1968.
     In 1968, celebrity participation in the presidential primary and general elections of the United States reached a level that had not been seen in some years.  This participation was more prominent among Democrats perhaps, but was also a factor in the Republican races.  Many in Hollywood and the arts community had been wary of political activism after experiencing the communist witch-hunts of the late 1940s and 1950s.  Congressional hearings, loyalty oaths, and Hollywood blacklists during that period had terrorized actors, producers, musicians, and others, wrecking careers and ruining lives.

     Yet in the 1960s,  the caldron of social issues and political unrest throughout the country,  coupled in 1967-68 with an offering of hopeful candidates – especially on the Democratic side — brought both older and newer Hollywood celebrities into the political process like never before.  “In no other election,” observed Time magazine in late May 1968, “have so many actors, singers, writers, poets, artists, professional athletes and assorted other celebrities signed up, given out and turned on for the candidates.”

     A war was then raging in Vietnam and a military draft was taking the nation’s young to fight it.  President Lyndon Johnson had raised U.S. troop strength in Vietnam to 486,000 by the end of 1967.  Protests had erupted at a number of colleges and universities.  In late October 1967, tens of thousands of demonstrators came to the Pentagon calling for an end to the war.  In addition, a growing civil rights movement had pointed up injustice and racism throughout America.  Three summers of urban unrest had occurred.  Riots in 1967 alone had taken more than 80 lives.  In the larger society, a counter culture in music, fashion and values – brought on by the young – was also pushing hard on convention.  And all of this, from Vietnam battle scenes to federal troops patrolling U.S. cities, was seen on television as never before.  Society seemed to be losing its moorings.  And more was yet to come, as further events – some traumatic and others unexpected – would fire the nation to the boiling point.  There was little standing on the sidelines; people from all walks of life were taking sides.

From left, Sidney Poitier, Harry Belafonte & Charlton Heston at 1963 Civil Rights march.
From left, Sidney Poitier, Harry Belafonte & Charlton Heston at 1963 Civil Rights march.

     Hollywood and the arts community had a long history of political involvement and activism on behalf of presidential candidates, dating at least to the 1920s.  Even in the dark days of the 1950s there had been a sizeable swath of Hollywood backing Democrat Adlai Stevenson for his Presidential bids of 1952 and 1956.  And in the 1960 election of Jack Kennedy, there was notable support from Frank Sinatra and friends, as well as Kennedy family connections to Hollywood.  Others, like singer Pete Seeger, had never stopped their activism, even in the face of political pressure.  By the early 1960s, with the civil rights movement in particular, a new wave actors and singers such as Joan Baez, Harry Belefonte, Marlon Brando, Bob Dylan, Charlton Heston, Sidney Poitier, Paul Newman and others were becoming involved in one way or another.  Some lent their name or provided financial support; others joined marches and demonstrations.   By the mid-1960s, however, the Vietnam War became a goading factor for many in Hollywood.  And among the first to speak out and oppose the war was an actor named Robert Vaughn.

TV actor Robert Vaughn led early Hollywood opposition to the Vietnam War.
TV actor Robert Vaughn led early Hollywood opposition to the Vietnam War.
 

The Man from UNCLE

     Robert Vaughn was the star of a popular primetime TV spy series called The Man From U.N.C.L.E., which ran from September 1964 to mid-January 1968. Vaughn was among the first to criticized President Lyndon B. Johnson on the Vietnam war – and he did so very publicly in a January 1966 speech.  In Indianapolis, at a dinner given to support Johnson’s re-election, Vaughn spoke out against the war and LBJ’s policy there.  “Everyone at the front table had hands over their eyes,” Vaughn later explained when asked about the reaction.  Vaughn became worried about the Vietnam War after immersing himself in all the documents, books and articles he could find on the subject.  “I can talk for six hours about the mistakes we have made,” he told one reporter in 1966.  “We have absolutely no reason to be in Viet Nam-legal, political or moral.”

     In late March 1966, Vaughn went to Washington to meet with politicians.  He lunched with Senator Frank Church (D-ID) and also had a lengthy meeting with Senator Wayne Morse (D-OR) to discuss the war. He told the press then “the Hollywood community is very much against” the Vietnam War. “[T]he Hollywood com- munity is very much against” the Vietnam War.
        – Robert Vaughn, March 1966.
But wasn’t it risky for a star to be so outspoken, he was asked?  “I’ve had nothing but encouragement from my friends in the industry, from the studio, even the network,” he said.  On his visit to Washington that weekend Vaughn was a house guest of Bobby Kennedy’s at Hickory Hill in nearby Virginia.  He continued to be visible in the Vietnam debate, appearing as a guest on William F. Buckley’s TV talk show, Firing Line. He also engaged in impromptu debate with Vice President Hubert Humphrey on a live Minneapolis talk show. At the peak of Vaughn’s popularity, he was asked by the California Democratic Party to oppose fellow actor, Republican Ronald Reagan, then running for California governor in the 1966 election.  Vaughn, however, supported Democrat Edmund G. Brown, who lost in a landslide to Reagan.

     Vaughn would continue to oppose the war, leading a group called Dissenting Democrats.  By early 1968, Vaughn supported the emerging anti-war presidential candidate Senator Eugene McCarthy (D-MN), then running for his party’s nomination. (Vaughn had later planned to switch to Robert Kennedy, a close friend, if Kennedy won the June 1968 California primary).

 

Gene McCarthy

McCarthy at 1968 campaign rally in Wisconsin.
McCarthy at 1968 campaign rally in Wisconsin.

     Gene McCarthy had announced his candidacy for the White House on November 30, 1967.  Opposing the war was the main issue for McCarthy, who had been prodded to run by anti-war activists.  On the Republican side, former vice President Richard Nixon announced his candidacy in January 1968.  And on February 8th, Alabama’s Democratic Governor George Wallace – the segregationist who in June 1963 had stood at the doors of the University of Alabama to block integration – entered the presidential race as an Independent.

     McCarthy attracted some of the more liberal Democrats in Hollywood, including those who had been for Adlai Stevenson in the 1950s.  “…[H]e’s the man who expresses discontent with dignity,” actor Eli Wallach would say of McCarthy in 1968.  Wallach had won a Tony Award in 1951 for his role in the Tennessee Williams play The Rose Tattoo and also became famous for his role as Tuco the “ugly” in the 1966 film The Good, the Bad and the Ugly. Wallach liked the fact that McCarthy had taken “a firm position on the war in Vietnam.”  Wallach and his wife Anne Jackson, a stage actress, were among those who held fundraisers and poetry readings for McCarthy.  Actress Myrna Loy was another McCarthy supporter.  She had played opposite William Powell, Clark Gable, Melvyn Douglas, and Tryone Power in films of the 1930s and 1940s.  Loy was a lifelong activist who had supported Adlai Stevenson in 1952 and 1956.  In 1968, she became a stalwart for McCarthy, making personal campaign appearances for him and hosting fundraisers.  But perhaps the most important Hollywood star to come out for McCarthy was Paul Newman.

 

The Paul Newman Factor

Paul Newman at 1968 fundraiser.
Paul Newman at 1968 fundraiser.
      Paul Newman was then among Hollywood’s most popular actors, and among its top five box office draws.  By 1968, he had appeared in more than a dozen major films and had a following of both older and younger Americans.  Among his films, for example, were: Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956), as boxer Rocky Graziano; Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958), opposite Elizabeth Taylor; and The Young Philadelphians (1959).  He also appeared with his wife Joanne Woodward in several films including: The Long, Hot Summer (1958), Rally ‘Round the Flag, Boys!, (1958), From the Terrace (1960), Paris Blues (1961), and A New Kind of Love (1963).  Other signature films of Newman’s in the 1960s were: Exodus (1960), The Hustler (1961), Hud (1963), Harper (1966), Hombre (1967), and Cool Hand Luke (1967).  Along with Joanne Woodward, Newman took time away from his profession during 1968 to work months at a time for McCarthy.  He made numerous campaign appearances for McCarthy throughout the country during the Democratic primaries and also became a McCarthy delegate to the Democratic convention.

Campaigning by Newman at a McCarthy rally in Menominee Falls, Wisconsin, 1968.
Campaigning by Newman at a McCarthy rally in Menominee Falls, Wisconsin, 1968.
      Newman’s support for McCarthy – like many others – was largely because of the Vietnam War. McCarthy, however, was not well known outside of the U.S. Senate in Washington D.C. and his home state of Minnesota.  In addition to actively campaigning for McCarthy, Newman was also filmed in political ads for the candidate, and emceed a telethon to raise money for McCarthy that had been quite successful.  But it was Newman’s early help in the New Hampshire primary that was particularly important for McCarthy – especially given the results and the political fallout that followed. In fact, some credit Newman with raising McCarthy’s visibility enough to enable him to make the strong showing he did in New Hampshire – a showing which later affected decisions by both Lyndon Johnson and Bobby Kennedy.

     Newman made campaign appearances in New Hampshire during February and March 1968, some with wife Joanne Woodward.  Tony Randall and Rod Serling also made appearances for McCarthy in New Hampshire.  But it was Newman who drew the crowds and notice by the press.  In March 1968, Newman went to Claremont, New Hampshire to campaign for McCarthy.  Tony Podesta, then a young MIT student, was Newman’s campaign contact.  Podesta worried that day that only a few people might show up to hear Newman. Some credit Paul Newman with raising McCarthy’s visibility in New Hamp- shire, enabling his strong showing there. Instead, more than 2,000 people came out to mob Newman.  “I didn’t come here to help Gene McCarthy,” Newman would say to his listeners that day.  “I need McCarthy’s help.”

     “Until that point,” said Podesta, “McCarthy was some sort of a quack not too many people knew about, but as soon as Paul Newman came to speak for him, he immediately became a national figure.”  In New Hampshire, the Manchester Union Leader newspaper published a political cartoon showing Newman being followed by McCarthy with the caption: “Who’s the guy with Paul Newman?”  Author Darcy Richardson would later write in A Nation Divided: The Presidential Election of 1968, that Newman’s visit to the state “caused a great stir and drew considerable attention to McCarthy’s candidacy.” New Republic columnist Richard Stout, attributing honesty and conviction to Newman’s New Hampshire campaigning, wrote that the actor “had the star power McCarthy lacked, and imperceptibly was transferring it to the candidate.” Barbara Handman, who ran The Arts & Letters Committee for McCarthy, would later put it more plainly: “Paul turned the tide for McCarthy. . . Paul put him on the map — he [ McCarthy] started getting national coverage by the press. He started being taken seriously.”

 

New Hampshire Earthquake

     On March 12, 1964, McCarthy won 42 percent of the vote in New Hampshire to Lyndon Johnson’s 49 percent, a very strong showing for McCarthy and an embarrassment for Johnson.  McCarthy’s campaign now had a new legitimacy and momentum that would have a cascading effect on decisions that both Lyndon Johnson and Bobby Kennedy would make.  Paul Newman, meanwhile, continued to campaign for McCarthy beyond New Hampshire and throughout the election year.

March 22, 1968 edition of Time magazine, reporting on McCarthy’s surprising showing in New Hampshire & the emerging Democratic fight.
March 22, 1968 edition of Time magazine, reporting on McCarthy’s surprising showing in New Hampshire & the emerging Democratic fight.
      McCarthy soon had a long list of luminaries supporting his run for the White House, including: Alan Arkin, Betty Comden, Melvyn Douglas, Adolf Green, Woody Allen, Carl Reiner, Barbra Streisand, Jill St. John, Darren McGavin, Eva Marie Saint, Burt Lancaster, Sonny Fox, Alan Jay Lerner, Dick Van Dyke, and Leonard Nemoy.  Bette Davis was also a McCarthy supporter and served as hostess for some of his functions.  Playwright Arthur Miller, and author William Styron were also active for McCarthy as were folk singers Peter, Paul & Mary.  Some of the famous names would also participate in what were then called “Eugene cabarets”– fundraising, entertain- ment, and other gatherings held in New York, San Francisco, and other cities using an admission price to raise money for McCarthy.  These events ranged from nightclub shows to poetry readings.  One featured Elaine May doing comedy, another had social critic and cartoonist Jules Feiffer as the guest.  In Los Angeles, a “Eugene cabaret” featured novelist William Styron, actor Ossie Davis, and writer James Baldwin in a debate on Styron’s novel, The Confessions of Nat Turner.  In later months, the “Eugene cabarets” would be contributing $11,500 a week to McCarthy’s campaign. And there would be larger events too.  In mid-May 1968, some 19,000 Eugene McCarthy supporters attended a star-studded event at New York City’s Madison Square Garden.  Playwright Neil Simon along with comedians Tony Randall and Larry Blyden performed a satirical skit spoofing Johnson and Humphrey, along with other events.  The entertainers that night raised $300,000 for McCarthy.  But it was the New Hampshire primary that had sent McCarthy on his way.  Also important for McCarthy in New Hampshire had been the college kids who came “clean for Gene” and gave endless hours to his campaign.  However, in the wake of McCarthy’s surprise showing in New Hampshire, came Bobby Kennedy.

Bobby Kennedy, 1968.
Bobby Kennedy, 1968.
 

Kennedy In, LBJ Out

On March 16th, four days after the New Hampshire primary showed Lyndon Johnson to be vulnerable and McCarthy viable, Bobby Kennedy jumped into the race, angering many McCarthy supporters.  Kennedy had agonized over whether to enter the race for months, and in fact, McCarthy and supporters had gone to Kennedy in 1967 to urge him to run.  McCarthy then decided to enter the race after it appeared Kennedy was not going to run.  But once Kennedy entered the race, he and McCarthy engaged in an increasingly heated and sometimes bitter contest for the nomination.

     In 1968, however, party leaders still had a great deal of influence in the nominating process and the selection of delegates.  Primaries then were less important and fewer in number than they are today.  Still, a strong showing in certain primaries could create a bandwagon effect and show the party establishment that a particular candidate was viable.  In 1960, John Kennedy helped get the party’s attention when he defeated Hubert Humphrey in the West Virginia primary.  Now in 1968, Gene McCarthy had the party’s attention.

Lyndon Johnson's surprise announcement of March 31, 1968 made headlines across the country.
Lyndon Johnson's surprise announcement of March 31, 1968 made headlines across the country.
      Robert Kennedy would have to defeat McCarthy and President Johnson in every primary that he could then still enter.  Among the primaries then available were: Indiana and Washington, D.C. on May 7th; Nebraska on May 14th; Oregon on May 28th; California and South Dakota on June 4th; and New York on June 18th.  But then unexpectedly, following Kennedy’s announcement less than two weeks later, came another jolt for the party.  Lyndon Johnson, a sitting president and the presumed nominee of his party, stunned the nation by announcing on national television that he would not accept nor seek the Democratic presidential nomination.  Johnson, among other things, had seen polling data from the then-pending Wisconsin primary showing McCarthy in the lead, which on April 2nd McCarthy would win with 56 percent of the vote to LBJ’s 35 percent.

King shot, April 4, 1968.
King shot, April 4, 1968.
 

King Shot!

     On April 4th, 1968, several days after LBJ’s bombshell, the nation was ripped apart by news that civil rights leader Martin Luther King had been assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee. In the next few days, dozens of American cities erupted in violence.

RFK at scene of his famous speech in Indianapolis the evening Martin Luther King died. AP Photo/Leroy Patton, Indianapolis News.
RFK at scene of his famous speech in Indianapolis the evening Martin Luther King died. AP Photo/Leroy Patton, Indianapolis News.
      Robert Kennedy, who had then begun his campaign, had arrived in Indiana on April 4th to begin some campaigning there for the upcoming primary.  On a flight from Muncie to Indianapolis, he learned that civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., had been shot, and before landing heard that King had died.  Despite warnings from Indianapolis police that they could not guarantee his safety, Kennedy decided to proceed with plans to address an outdoor rally to be held in the heart of the city’s African American community.  On that cold and windy evening, Kennedy broke the news of King’s death in an impassioned, extemporaneous speech on the need for compassion in the face of violence.  It has proven to be one of the great speeches in American political history.  Although a number of cities erupted with riots following King’s death, Indianapolis did not.  Political campaigns, meanwhile, were suspended for about a week as the nation mourned King’s death.

     By the end of April, the nation was boiling on other fronts, too. Student protesters at Columbia University in New York City took over the administration building on April 23rd and shut down the campus.  On the campaign trail, McCarthy won the April 23rd Pennsylvania primary, and a few days later, on April 27th, Lyndon Johnson’s Vice President, former Minnesota senator Hubert Humphrey, formally announced he would seek the Democratic presidential nomination.

Vice President Hubert Humphrey enters the race for the Democratic nomination, April 1968.
Vice President Hubert Humphrey enters the race for the Democratic nomination, April 1968.
      Humphrey, however, was taking a distinctly different route to the nomination than McCarthy and Kennedy.  Humphrey, for the most part, did not go the primary route, although he did have surrogates in a few states.  Instead, Humphrey planned to use the “party machine” to gather his delegates and was the favored establishment candidate.

     Lyndon Johnson would also help Humphrey, but mostly from behind the scenes since Johnson was regarded a liability for any candidate given his Vietnam record.  Meanwhile, on the campaign trail, a showdown of sorts was brewing between Kennedy and McCarthy as the May 7th Indiana primary approached.

 

Celebs for McCarthy

     In April and early May of 1968, there was a lot of campaigning in Indiana, and star power was again at work with celebrities helping McCarthy.  In April, Paul Newman was drawing large crowds in the state for McCarthy, where he made 15 appearances.  At one of those stops, Newman explained from a tailgate of station wagon: “I am not a public speaker. I am not a politician. I’m not here because I’m an actor. I’m here because I’ve got six kids. I don’t want it written on my gravestone, ‘He was not part of his times.’ Also making appearances for McCarthy in Indiana were  Simon & Garfunkel, Dustin Hoffman, Myrna Loy,  and  Gary Moore. The times are too critical to be dissenting in your own bathroom.”  Newman continued campaigning for McCarthy through May 7 and was then still drawing crowds, with his own motorcade sometimes followed by cars of adoring fans.

     Also making appearances for McCarthy in Indiana were actor Dustin Hoffman, singing duo Simon & Garfunkel, Myrna Loy, and TV host Gary Moore.  Simon & Garfunkel sang at a McCarthy fundraiser at the Indiana State Fairgrounds Coliseum in May 1968, where Dustin Hoffman introduced them.  Hoffman’s popular film at the time, The Graduate – filled with a Simon & Garfunkel soundtrack – was then still in theaters.  This celebrity support for McCarthy, as Newman had shown in New Hampshire, was important for McCarthy.  “When you have a candidate who is not as well known, and there’s no money so that you can’t by television time,” explained Barbara Handman, head of the Arts and Letters Committee for McCarthy, “these people [celebs] become more and more effective for us.  They’re well-known drawing cards…”  Handman had previously headed up similar committees for Jack Kennedy in 1960, and Lyndon Johnson in 1964.  Her husband, Wynn Handman, was co-founder of the American Palace Theater.  Both were well connected in Hollywood.

 

Celebs for Kennedy

Andy Williams, Robert Kennedy, Perry Como, Ted Kennedy, Eddie Fisher at unspecified 1968 fundraising telethon, Lisner Auditorium, G.W. University, Wash., D.C. (photo, GW University).
Andy Williams, Robert Kennedy, Perry Como, Ted Kennedy, Eddie Fisher at unspecified 1968 fundraising telethon, Lisner Auditorium, G.W. University, Wash., D.C. (photo, GW University).
     Robert Kennedy, a celebrity in his own right, would draw crowds like a rock star once his campaign got going – especially later in California.  But even Kennedy had famous names on his side.  After he announced his candidacy in March 1968, his campaign was deluged with offers of help from Hollywood – some 100 actors, directors and producers called offering their support.  And in a blow to McCarthy, some of his early Hollywood supporters, such as Lauren Bacall, Kirk Douglas, Sammy Davis Jr., Candice Bergen, Rosemary Clooney, Andy Williams, and the rock ‘n roll group, Jefferson Airplane, now broke for Kennedy.  Among other Hollywood and celebrity supporters working for Kennedy were: Warren Beatty,  Bill Cosby, Tony Curtis, Bobby Darin, Henry Fonda, Jack Lemon, Shirley MacLaine, Malina Mercouri, Jack Parr, David Suskind, Nancy Wilson, Gene Kelly, Jack Lemon, Gregory Peck, and Rod Steiger.  Sammy Davis, Jr., who was performing in Chicago in the spring of 1968 in Golden Boy, would campaign for Bobby on his days off at small colleges in the nearby states of Nebraska and Indiana.  Filmmaker John Frankenheimer directed and produced ads for Robert Kennedy, and Kennedy also hired documentary filmmaker Charles Guggenheim to produce campaign films.

Bobby Kennedy campaigning in Indianapolis, May 1968. Behind Kennedy to the right, are NFL football stars Lamar Kundy, Rosey Grier and Deacon Jones. (photo by Bill Eppridge from his book, 'A Time It Was'.
Bobby Kennedy campaigning in Indianapolis, May 1968. Behind Kennedy to the right, are NFL football stars Lamar Kundy, Rosey Grier and Deacon Jones. (photo by Bill Eppridge from his book, 'A Time It Was'.
      Kennedy also had a number of professional athletes in his corner, including NFL football stars Lamar Lundy, Rosey Grier, and Deacon Jones and former prizefighter Tony Zale. Rafer Johnson, a 1960 Olympic gold medalist, headed an “Athlete’s for Kennedy” committee and often accompanied Kennedy on his tours through black communities.

     Lesley Gore, a pop singer who by then had several Top 40 hits – including “It’s My Party” (1963), “You Don’t Own Me” (1964), “Sunshine, Lollipops & Rainbows” (1965), and “California Nights” (1967) — also became a Kennedy supporter.  At 21 years old, and about to graduate from Sarah Lawrence College in Yonkers, New York, Gore became head of Kennedy’s effort to get young voters, called “First Voters for Kennedy.”  She volunteered after she heard that Kennedy needed someone to attract young voters.  “I understand there are 13 million first-time voters this year,” she told a New York Times reporter in early April 1968.  “After my graduation next month I intend to give more of my time to visiting colleges and universities around the country.”  In this effort, Gore would be traveling with actresses Candice Bergen and Patty Duke, and also the rock group, Jefferson Airplane.

     Andy Williams, a friend and skiing companion to Kennedy, was also a key supporter. “I’m doing it because I think it important,” Williams told a New York Times reporter. “I am worried about the image of America. People don’t think Nixon is swell, and they don’t think Humphrey is swell.  Bobby has star quality.” Williams would refurbish his guest house for use by the Kennedy family when Bobby campaigned in California.

 

Sinatra for Humphrey

Frank Sinatra & Hubert Humphrey, Washington, D.C., May 1968.
Frank Sinatra & Hubert Humphrey, Washington, D.C., May 1968.
      One entertainer noticeably absent from the Kennedy list was Frank Sinatra.  Sinatra had backed JFK in 1960 but had a falling out with Jack Kennedy after that election.  And as Attorney General, Bobby had initiated some actions against the Las Vegas gambling scene where Sinatra had friends and interests.  Sinatra supported Vice President Hubert Humphrey for the nomination, and had met with Humphrey in Washington in early May, pledging to make campaign appearances for Humphrey in California and elsewhere.  Sinatra headlined an Oakland, California gala for Humphrey and a delegate slate that opposed RFK in May.  At the Oakland fundraiser, held on May 22, 1968, Sinatra gave an extensive live performance, which in recent years has been found on the web in various bootleg editions.  Sinatra also performed for Humphrey at other events, including an early August 1968 gala at Cobo Hall in Detroit, and he also did a TV ad for Humphrey that fall.

     During his campaign, Humphrey would gather additional Hollywood and celebrity supporters beyond Sinatra.  Among these were some of the older and more established Hollywood names, sports stars, and other leading names, including actress Tallulah Bankhead, opera star Roberta Peters, jazz singer Sarah Vaughan, former heavyweight boxing champ Jack Dempsey, writer and naturalist Joseph Wood Krutch, and fashion designer Mollie Parnis.

 

Indiana & Beyond

A Gene McCarthy campaign celebration, 1968.
A Gene McCarthy campaign celebration, 1968.
      Back on the campaign trail, Kennedy won the Indiana primary on May 7th, and then defeated McCarthy in the Nebraska primary on May 14th.  But McCarthy upset Kennedy in the Oregon primary on May 28th — the first time a Kennedy had ever lost a public election.  After Kennedy’s defeat in Oregon, the California June 5th primary became the crucial showdown for Kennedy and McCarthy.

     Both candidates campaigned vigorously throughout California, a winner-take-all contest with a large pot of delegates.  McCarthy stumped the state’s colleges and universities, where he was recognized for being the first candidate to oppose the war.  Kennedy campaigned in the ghettos and barrios of the state’s larger cities, where he was mobbed by enthusiastic supporters.  A few days before the election, Kennedy and McCarthy also engaged in a televised debate – considered a draw.

     On the east coast, meanwhile, and in New York city in particular, there was a star-studded celebrity fundraising rally for McCarthy in New York’s Madison Square Garden on May 19, 1968.  One Canadian blogger, who as a teenager happened to be in New York city that weekend with a friend, recently wrote the following  “forty-years-ago” remembrance of the event:

. . .Rob and I did many crazy things that weekend. . . .We learned that McCarthy was having a rally at Madison Square Garden on the Sunday night so along we went figuring we’d meet some more chicks. That event was awe inspiring.

All sorts of famous people spoke or performed that night. Paul Newman, Phil Ochs, Mary Tyler Moore to name a few. A new, young actor said a few words to the crowd on behalf of the candidate. We recognized him as the star of the ‘adult’ movie we had seen the night before. The movie was The Graduate and he was a very young Dustin Hoffman.

Celebrities walked thru the arena imploring people to donate to the campaign. Tony Randall came up our aisle and we gave him a couple of bucks. Stewart Mott (General Motors rich kid) stood up and donated $125,000 right there on the spot. The crowd was delirious. Sen. McCarthy spoke to the crowd and promised to take his fight against Sen. Kennedy all the way to the Chicago convention in August. It was pretty heady stuff for a 17 year-old from Toronto….

RFK campaigning in California.
RFK campaigning in California.
      On May 21, 1968, the Kennedy campaign in California unveiled its “Hollywood for Kennedy” committee.  According to Joseph Palermo’s book, In His Own Right, this committee was chaired by singer Andy Williams, and included, among others: Lauren Bacall, Otto Preminger, Mahalia Jackson, Sidney Portier, Janet Leigh, Shelley Winters, Marlene Dietrich, Rita Hayworth, Kim Novak, Trini Lopez, Milton Berle, Henry Mancini, Elizabeth Montgomery, and Marlo Thomas.  According to Palermo: “Kennedy could count on well-known actors and entertainers who shared his views on the war and on race relations.“…Kennedy’s enlistment of the Hollywood elite built on his family ties to the entertainment industry dating back to the 1920s…” - Joseph Palermo . . . A unique tactical alliance developed between California’s exorbitantly wealthy celebrity class, and some of the poorest, most dispossessed people of the state.  Kennedy’s enlistment of the Hollywood elite built on his family ties to the entertainment industry dating back to the 1920s, and helped craft the image that he might restore to the White House some of the glamour of Camelot.”  Michael Harrington, author of The Other America, also campaigned for Kennedy in California, as did John Fell Stevenson, the son of Adlai Stevenson.  The Kennedy campaign also organized two star-studded “Kennedy for President” galas, one at the Los Angeles Sports Arena on May 24, the other at the San Francisco Civic Auditorium on June 1st.  These were nationally-televised events that gave Kennedy added exposure.

Robert Kennedy campaigning.
Robert Kennedy campaigning.
      On June 4, the day of the California primary, after a grueling campaign of some 85 days to that point, Kennedy rested with his wife Ethel and six of their children at the Malibu, California home of movie director and friend, John Frankenheimer.  Late in the day, Frankenheimer brought Kennedy to the campaign’s election night headquarters at the Ambassador Hotel.  In a suite there, Kennedy awaited the results in the company of friends and supporters, among them, Andy Williams, Shirley MacLaine, Rafer Johnson, and Milton Berle.

 

RFK Assassinated!

      Four hours after the polls closed in California, Kennedy claimed victory as he addressed his campaign supporters just past midnight in the Ambassador Hotel.  On his way through the kitchen to exit the hotel, he was mortally wounded by assassin Sirhan Sirhan.  His death became yet another of 1968′s convulsing events.  Seen as an emerging beacon of hope in a dismal time, many had pinned their hopes on Kennedy and took his loss very personally.  The Democratic party went into a tailspin as a stunned nation grieved.  Thousands lined the tracks as Kennedy’s funeral train moved from New York City to Washington D.C.  Millions watched his funeral on television.  At the request of Bobby’s wife, Ethel, Andy Williams sang the “Battle Hymn of the Republic” at Kennedy’s funeral.

New York Times headlines, June 5, 1968.
New York Times headlines, June 5, 1968.
      Kennedy had defeated McCarthy in California, 46 percent to 42 percent.  Kennedy’s team believed that by winning California, he would knock McCarthy out of the race and set up a one-on-one contest against Hubert Humphrey at the national convention that August.  Kennedy had also planned to woo Humphrey delegates before the convention.  Still, Kennedy was in second place overall after the California primary, with 393 delegates compared to Humphrey’s 561.  McCarthy then held 258 delegates.  McCarthy was aiming for the New York primary, where he had support from antiwar activists in New York City.

     Historians and journalists have disagreed about Kennedy’s chances for the nomination had he not been assassinated.  Michael Beschloss believes it unlikely that Kennedy could have secured the nomination since most of the delegates were then uncommitted and yet to be chosen at the Democratic convention.  Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. and author Jules Witcover have argued that Kennedy’s broad appeal and charisma would have given him the nomination at the convention.  And still others add that Kennedy’s experience in his brother’s presidential campaign, plus a potential alliance with Chicago mayor Richard Daley at the Democratic Convention, might have helped him secure the nomination.

 

Dems Realign

     Leading up to Democratic convention in Chicago, former Kennedy supporters tried to sort out what had happened and whether and how they would line up with other candidates.  George Plimpton, a well known New Yorker and journalist who authored the 1963 book Paper Lion, had been a Kennedy supporter.  He was with Kennedy the night he was assassinated in the Ambassador Hotel kitchen, walking in front of him.  In New York, on August 14, 1968, Plimpton sponsored a party at the Cheetah nightclub on behalf of McCarthy supporters, along with co-sponsor William Styron, author of the The Confessions of Nat Turner. Henry Fonda was scheduled to host a McCarthy rally in Houston.  “I started out with Senator Kennedy,” explained Fonda to a New York Times reporter, “Now I think McCarthy is the best choice on the horizon.”  McCarthy supporters had other rallies and fundraisers scheduled in 24 other cities for mid-August ahead of the Chicago convention, including one at New York’s Madison Square Garden that included conductor Leonard Bernstein and singer Harry Belafonte.  Hubert Humphrey’s campaign also had fundraisers, including one in early August at Detroit’s Cobo Hall with performances by Frank Sinatra, Trini Lopez, and comedian Pat Henry.

Humphrey campaign poster.
Humphrey campaign poster.
      Trini Lopez, a popular singer in the 1960s who had more than a dozen pop and adult contemporary hit songs, including 1963′s “If I Had A Hammer,” worked vigorously for Humphrey in August1968.  Lopez postponed an opening at Harrah’s nightclub in Las Vegas to travel with Humphrey and help him with younger voters.  Humphrey also made pre-convention campaign appearances with other music celebrities, including one with singer James Brown in the Watts section of Los Angeles, where Humphrey targeted “black business ownership” as the subject of his pitch, but also, after Brown’s prompting, did a little “soft shoe” Boogaloo with the singer.  On the California television show It’s Happening, Humphrey chatted with the leader of the rock group, Paul Revere and The Raiders, attempting to reach younger voters.

     By mid-August 1968, “Entertainers for Humphrey” included Hollywood names such as Bill Dana, Victor Borge, Alan King, and George Jessel.  There were also more than 80 other luminaries in a somewhat less well-known “arts & letters” group including: classical pianist Eugene Istomin, author and scholar Ralph Ellison, violin virtuoso Isaac Stern, manager/impresario Sol Hurok, playwright Sidney Kingsley, opera singer Robert Merrill, authors John Steinbeck, James T. Farrel, and Herman Wouk, and dancer Carmen de Lavallade.  Humphrey had also picked up some former supporters of Republican Nelson Rockefeller, including architect Philip Johnson and dancer Maria Tallchief.  But Humphrey’s biggest challenges were directly ahead at the Democratic National Convention.

National Guardsmen at the Conrad Hilton Hotel at the Democratic National Convention.
National Guardsmen at the Conrad Hilton Hotel at the Democratic National Convention.

 

Turmoil in Chicago

As the 1968 Democratic National Convention opened in Chicago on August 26, 1968, there was a fractured party and little agreement on the main platform issue, the Vietnam War.  In addition to the formal business of the presidential nomination inside the convention hall, there was a huge focus on the convention location as a protest venue for  the Vietnam War, as thousands of young activists had come to Chicago.  But Chicago’s Democratic Mayor Richard J. Daley – also the political boss running the convention – had prepared for anything, and had the Chicago police and the National Guard ready for action.  Tensions soon came to a head.

Convention floor, 1968.
Convention floor, 1968.
      The convention became a national spectacle – both inside the hall and outside in the streets – and one of the most violent political scenes in American history.  And much of it was played out on prime-time television.  Americans were shocked to see Chicago police brutally beating anti-war protesters in the streets.  Tear gas used to disperse the protesters wafted into hotel suites of delegates and even that of candidate Humphrey.  At the convention itself, Chicago mayor Richard Daley was blamed for the police clubbings in the streets.  Daley at one point was seen on television angrily cursing Senator Abraham Ribicoff of Connecticut, who had made a speech denouncing the excesses of the Chicago police.  Inside the hall, CBS News reporter Dan Rather was attacked on the floor of the convention while covering the proceedings.

     Haynes Johnson, a reporter who then covered the convention for the Washington Post , has recently written: “The 1968 Chicago convention became a lacerating event, a distillation of a year of heartbreak, assassinations, riots and a breakdown in law and order that made it seem as if the country were coming apart.  In its psychic impact, and its long-term political consequences, it eclipsed any other such convention in American history, destroying faith in politicians, in the political system, in the country and in its institutions.  No one who was there, or who watched it on television, could escape the memory of what took place before their eyes.”

Paul Newman & Arthur Miller at convention.
Paul Newman & Arthur Miller at convention.
      A number of Hollywood activists and celebrities who had campaigned for various candidates attended the convention – some as formal delegates.  Paul Newman and playwright Arthur Miller, for example, came as McCarthy delegates from Connecticut.  Television coverage of the convention not only captured the action of the formal proceedings and some of the violence in the streets, but also did interviews with various pundits and some of the attending celebrities.  ABC News of August 28, 1968, for example, included short interviews with Paul Newman, Tony Randall, Gore Vidal, and Shirley MacLaine.  Sonny Bono – of the famed “Sonny & Cher” rock star duo – had come to Chicago to propose a plank in the Democratic platform for a commission to look into the generation gap, or as he saw it, the potential problem of “duel society.”  Bono, then 28, would become a Republican Congressman in the 1990s.  Dinah Shore made a brief convention appearance for McCarthy, singing her famous “See The USA in Your Chevrolet” anthem, adapting it as, “Save The USA, the McCarthy Way, America is the Greatest Land of All,” throwing her trademarked big kiss at the end.

 

The Nomination

Humphrey supporters, 1968 Democratic National Convention.
Humphrey supporters, 1968 Democratic National Convention.
      During the convention process, there had been some attempt to prevent Hubert Humphrey from getting the nomination.  Robert Kennedy’s death had sent the already frayed Democratic Party into some disarray.  Kennedy’s delegates had not united behind any single candidate: some went to McCarthy, some went to a late candidacy of Senator George McGovern of South Dakota, and others simply did not vote. The splintering of Bobby Kennedy’s supporters appeared to help Humphrey.  And the Vietnam plank being considered was not supported by many liberals.  At the convention, McCarthy would say that “if Senator Kennedy had not died, we would have this party under control on Vietnam.”  And although McCarthy did not personally like Robert Kennedy and fought him bitterly in the primaries, he offered to support a make-shift plan to nominate his younger brother, Senator Ted Kennedy, on the first ballot.  McCarthy was approached on the proposal by Stephen Smith, Kennedy’s brother-in-law, and McCarthy offered to throw all his weight to Ted Kennedy.  McCarthy’s gesture was unexpected, but the Ted Kennedy effort faltered in any case.  In the end, Humphrey beat McCarthy and McGovern on the first ballot.  The convention then chose Senator Ed Muskie of Maine to be Humphrey’s running mate.  But Time magazine would later report in its September 6th issue, showing the Humphrey-Muskie pairing on its cover, but with Mayor Daley in the background, “What was to have been remembered as the Democratic Convention that nominated Hubert Humphrey may go down in history instead as an event of rancor and rioting.”

Time cover Sept 6, 1968: Humphrey-Muskie ticket shadowed by Chicago.
Time cover Sept 6, 1968: Humphrey-Muskie ticket shadowed by Chicago.
      Post-Chicago, a number of active Democrats, including various Hollywood supporters, were not happy with the choices before them.  Walter Matthau called the Humphrey-Nixon face-off “a choice between strychnine and arsenic.”  Paul Newman told a Time reporter he might need ”a month of serious drinking” before deciding on whether to support Humphrey actively.  Newman did say, however, that he would cast his ballot for Humphrey.  Steve Allen, also among McCarthy’s Hollywood supporters, lent his name to the Humphrey campaign as well.

     Humphrey, for his part, attempted to reach out to Hollywood celebrities, as California would be a crucial state in the general election.  Humphrey met with a number of celebrities during and after the convention, one of whom was Warren Beatty.  Beatty in 1967 had directed and starred in the movie Bonnie & Clyde, a huge box office hit.  Beatty had appeared in a number of earlier films as well, from Splendor in the Grass (1961) to Kaleidoscope (1966).  Beatty reportedly offered to make a campaign film for Humphrey if he would agree to denounce the war in Vietnam, which Humphrey would not do.  During September and October 1968, a number of Hollywood’s stars and celebrities came around to support Humphrey, with gala events and/or rallies such as one at the Lincoln Center for Performing Arts in New York in late September, and another at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles in late October.

Hollywood actor E.G. Marshall narrated a political ad for Hubert Humphrey in 1968 that pointedly raised doubts about opponents Nixon and Wallace.
Hollywood actor E.G. Marshall narrated a political ad for Hubert Humphrey in 1968 that pointedly raised doubts about opponents Nixon and Wallace.
      There were also celebrities who helped Humphrey in television advertising, such as E. G. Marshall, a two-time Emmy Award-winning actor.  Marshall played a lawyer named Lawrence Preston on a popular 1960s TV show, The Defenders and also co-starred in a famous 1957 movie 12 Angry Men.  Marshall narrated a four-minute TV ad for Humphrey that contrasted Humphrey’s record versus that of opponents, Richard Nixon and George Wallace.  In the ad, the authoritative and well-spoken Marshall stood by large, life-size photographs of each Wallace and Nixon, ticking off the problems of each candidate as he stood by their likeness.  At the end, alongside of Humphrey’s photograph, after extolling his best qualities, Marshall concludes: “There is only one man of the three who trusts me, and who trusts you…. Now he is asking us to trust him… This is a time when a good man can become a great man. I believe in Hubert Humphrey, and I trust him.  And God willing, he will be our next President.”

New York Times, 7 Nov 1968.
New York Times, 7 Nov 1968.

 

Nixon Wins

     On November 5th in one of the closest elections in U.S. history, Nixon beat Humphrey by a slim margin.  Although Nixon took 302 electoral votes to Humphrey’s 191, the popular vote was extremely close: Nixon at 31,375,000 to 31,125,000 for Humphrey, or 43.4 percent to 43.1 percent.  Third party candidate George Wallace was a key factor in the race, taking more votes from Humphrey than Nixon,  especially in the south and among union and working class voters in the north.  Nearly 10 million votes were cast for Wallace, some 13.5 percent of the popular vote.  He won five southern states and took 45 electoral votes.  Democrats did retain control of the House and Senate, but the country was now headed in a more conservative direction.  In the wake of their loss, the Democrats also reformed their presidential nominating process.  As Kennedy and McCarthy supporters gained more power within the party, changes were adopted for the 1972 convention making the nominating process more democratic and raising the role of primary elections. Hubert Humphrey would become the last nominee of either major party to win the nomination without having to compete directly in primary elections.

Warren Beatty, who worked for Bobby Kennedy in 1968, continued his activism & political film making, flirting with a White House bid himself in 1999.
Warren Beatty, who worked for Bobby Kennedy in 1968, continued his activism & political film making, flirting with a White House bid himself in 1999.

 

Celebrity Postscript

     Many of the celebrities who worked for Democratic candidates in 1968 did not throw in the towel after that election.  They came back in subsequent presidential election cycles to work for and support other Democrats ranging from George McGovern and Jimmy Carter to Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama.  And some of 1968′s activists, and their successors, also continued that long history of Hollywood film-making that has focused on American politics as film subject.   Among some of the post-1968 films that explored that realm, for example, were: The Candidate (1972, with Robert Redford, screenplay by Jeremy Larner, a Gene McCarthy speechwriter); All the President’s Men (1976, with Dustin Hoffman and Robert Redford); Wag The Dog, (1997, with Dustin Hoffman and Robert De Niro), Bullworth (1998, produced & directed by Warren Beatty who also plays the central character), and others.

     And certainly by 1968, if not before, it had become clear that Hollywood and politics were intersecting in an increasing number of ways, especially in the packaging of candidates.  Hollywood techniques were fast becoming political techniques.  Hollywood personalities like Ronald Reagan and George Murphy were winning political office by then as well – Murphy taking a U.S. Senate seat as a California Republican in 1964, and Reagan elected in 1966 as California’s Republican Governor. Certainly by 1968, if not before, it had become clear that Hollywood and politics were intersecting in an increasing number of ways. Reagan, of course, would become president in 1980, and others from Hollywood, such as Warren Beatty, would also consider running for the White House in the year 2000.

     Today, celebrities and Hollywood stars remain sought-after participants in elections and political causes of all kinds.  Their money and endorsements are key factors as well.  Yet polling experts and political pundits continue to debate the impact of celebrities on election outcomes, and many doubt their ability to sway voters.  Still, in 1968, celebrity involvement was a factor and did affect the course of events, as every political candidate at that time sought the help of Hollywood stars and other famous names to advance their respective campaigns.

Readers of this story may also find several other “politics & celebrity” stories at this website of interest, including the companion piece to this article on the Republicans and Richard Nixon in 1968, and also: “Barack & Bruce” (Bruce Springsteen & others campaigning for Barack Obama in 2008 & 2012); “The Jack Pack” (Frank Sinatra & his Rat Pack in John F. Kennedy’s 1960 campaign); and “I’m A Dole Man”( popular music in Bob Dole’s 1996 Presidential campaign). See also the “Politics & Culture” page for additional stories. Thanks for visiting – and please consider supporting this website. Thank you. — Jack Doyle

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Date Posted: 14 August 2008
Last Update: 26 June 2014
Comments to: jdoyle@pophistorydig.com

Article Citation:
Jack Doyle, “1968 Presidential Race, Democrats,”
PopHistoryDig.com, August 14, 2008.                                                                              Return to Home Page

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Sources, Links & Additional Information

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Peter Bart, “Vaughn: The Vietnik from U.N.C.L.E.,” New York Times, May 29, 1966, p. D-9.

Satan’s Little Helper ipod Warren Weaver, “M’Carthy Gets About 40%, Johnson and Nixon on Top in New Hampshire Voting; Rockefeller Lags,” The New York Times, Wednesday, March 13, 1968, p. 1.

“Unforeseen Eugene,” Time, Friday, March. 22, 1968.

‘The Hustler’ Is on Cue for McCarthy,” Washington Post-Times Herald, March 23, 1968, p. A-2.

E. W. Kenworthy, “Paul Newman Drawing Crowds In McCarthy Indiana Campaign,” New York Times, Monday, April 22, 1968, p.19

Louis Calta, “Entertainers Join Cast of Political Hopefuls; They Get Into Act to Back 3 Candidates for the Presidency,” New York Times, Saturday, April 6, 1968, p. 42.

Associated Press, “Celebrities Endorse Candidates,” Daily Collegian (State College, PA), May 5, 1968.

Lawrence E. Davies, “Sinatra Supports Slate Competing With Kennedy’s,” New York Times, Sunday, May 5, 1968, p. 42

“The Stars Leap Into Politics,” Life, May 10, 1968.

Leroy F. Aarons, “Poetry’s Popular At Club Eugene,” The Washington Post, Times Herald, May 16, 1968, p. A-20.

“The Pulchritude-Intellect Input,” Time, Friday, May 31, 1968.

“Newman and Miller Named Delegates to Convention,” New York Times, Wednesday July 10, 1968, p. 43.

“HHH Office Unit Opens, With Sinatra,” Washington Post, Times Herald, August 2, 1968, p. A-2.

Richard F. Shepard, “Stage and Literary Names Enlist for Candidates; Plimpton Giving a Party in Night Club to Further McCarthy’s Cause,” New York Times, Wednesday, August 14, 1968, p.40.

Florabel Muir, “Trini Goes All Out for HHH,” The Washington Post, Times Herald, August 15, 1968, p. D-21.

Dave Smith, “Singer to Tell Democrats of Youth’s Views,” Los Angeles Times, Aug 23, 1968, p. 27.

Victor S. Navasky, “Report on The Candidate Named Humphrey,” New York Times Magazine, Sunday August 25, 1968, p. 22.

“Guests Flock to Week-Long Party Given by Playboy…” New York Times, August 29, 1968.

Jack Gould, ” TV: A Chilling Spectacle in Chicago; Delegates See Tapes of Clashes in the Streets,” New York Times, Thursday August 29, 1968, p. 71.

Tom Wicker, “Humphrey Nominated on the First Ballot After His Plank on Vietnam is Approved; Police Battle Demonstrators in Streets,”New York Times, August 30, 1968.

David S. Broder, “Hangover in Chicago – Democrats Awake to a Party in Ruins,”The Washington Post, Times Herald, August 30, 1968 p. A-1.

“Dementia in the Second City,” Time, Friday, September 6, 1968.

“The Man Who Would Recapture Youth,” Friday, Time, September 6, 1968.

“Dissidents’ Dilemma,” Time, Friday, September 20, 1968.

Richard L. Coe, “Candidates By Starlight,” The Washington Post, Times Herald, November 3, 1968, p. K-1.

E.G. Marshall, 1968 T.V. ad for Humphrey Campaign, “Nixon vs. Humphrey vs. Wallace,” @ The Living Room Candidate.org.

Joe McGinniss, The Selling of the President, New York: Trident Press, 1969.

Pope Brock, “Myrna Loy: So Perfect in Her Way, it Almost Seems We Imagined Her,” People, April 4, 1988, p. 47.

Charles Kaiser, 1968 In America: Music, Politics, Chaos, Counterculture, New York: Grove Press, 1997, 336pp.

Ted Johnson (managing editor, Variety magazine), “Paul Newman: Bush is America’s ‘Biggest Internal Threat’,”Wilshire & Washington.com, June 26, 2007.

Ted Johnson, “Flashback to 1968,” Wilshire & Washington.com, April 25, 2008 (also ran in Variety magazine; Ted Johnson is managing editor).

Darcy G. Richardson, A Nation Divided: The 1968 Presidential Campaign, iUniverse, Inc., 2002, 532pp.

Tom Brokaw, Boom! Voice of the 1960s: Personal Reflections on the ‘60s and Today, New York: Random House, 2007, 662 pp.

“Robert Vaughn,” Wikipedia.org.

Ron Brownstein, The Power and The Glitter, New York: Knopf Publishing Group, December 1990 448 pp.

Joseph A. Palermo, “Here’s What RFK Did in California in 1968,” Huffington Post.com, January 10, 2008.

Joseph A. Palermo, In His Own Right: The Political Odyssey of Senator Robert F. Kennedy, New York: Columbia, 2001.

Associated Press, AP Photos @ www.daylife.com.

Ray E. Boomhower, “When Indiana Mattered – Book Examines Robert Kennedy’s Historic 1968 Primary Victory,” The Journal-Gazette, March 30, 2008.

“Forty Years Ago This Weekend – May, 1968….,”BlogChrisGillett.ca, Sunday, May 18, 2008.

Haynes Johnson, “1968 Democratic Convention: The Bosses Strike Back,” Smithsonian magazine and Smithsonian.com, August 2008.

“Democratic National Convention,” Wikipedia.org.

“United States Presidential Election, 1968,” Wikipedia.org.

See also, “The 1968 Exhibit,” a traveling and online exhibit organized by the Minnesota History Center partnership with the Atlanta History Center, the Chicago History Museum and the Oakland Museum of California.

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