The Pop History Dig

“Bandstand Performers”
1963

Dick Clark on the "American Bandstand" TV show from Philadelphia, appears with teens around him as he reads mail. AP photo.
Dick Clark on the "American Bandstand" TV show from Philadelphia, appears with teens around him as he reads mail. AP photo.
     In 1963, American Bandstand, the popular Philadelphia-based TV dance show with Dick Clark, was still going strong, having been broadcast nationally since August 1957.  The show was still seen mid-afternoons five days a week on the ABC television network.  However, by 1963, Bandstand’s format had been shortened to 30 minutes per show.  Not long thereafter, it began broadcasting taped shows rather than live broadcasts.  Then, in September 1963, ABC moved Bandstand to  Saturdays-only for one hour.  But even with those changes, American Bandstand was still a place where many aspiring recording artists came for national exposure to help launch and/or advance their careers.

     During 1963, there were more than 200 guest appearances on American Bandstand, with a number of artists making their national television debuts.  Among some of the more notable performers appearing in 1963 with one or more hit songs were: Dionne Warwick, Paul & Paula, the Ronettes, the Righteous Brothers, Peter Paul & Mary, Franki Valli & The Four Seasons, The Chiffons, Dion, Bobby Rydell, Skeeter Davis, Nancy Sinatra, Lesley Gore, Frankie Avalon, Gene Pitney, Dee Dee Sharp, Jan & Dean, Neil Sedaka, Darlene Love, Bobby Vinton, Link Wray, and others.

Cover sleeve for Dionne Warwick’s single, “Don't Make Me Over,” a hit song in 1962-63.
Cover sleeve for Dionne Warwick’s single, “Don't Make Me Over,” a hit song in 1962-63.
     In January 1963, Dionne Warwick made what may have been her first national TV appearance on American Bandstand performing her hit song, “Don’t Make Me Over.”  Released in October 1962, Warwick’s song had broken through nationally after receiving heavy radio play in San Francisco.  It debuted on the Billboard chart December 8, 1962, rising to No.21 on that chart and to No. 5 on the R&B chart in January 1963.  Warwick would follow this hit with others, including, “Anyone Who Had a Heart,” released in December 1963 and “Walk On By” in April 1964, a major international hit and million seller.  Warwick went on to stardom and a long career of many hits, including those in collaboration with the writer/producer team of Burt Bacharach and Hal David during the 1962 -1971 period.  Warwick, in fact, would put 56 singles on the Billboard Hot 100 chart between 1962 and 1998, making her one of the that era’s leading female recording stars.

Frank Valli & The Four Seasons appeared twice on “American Bandstand” in 1963.
Frank Valli & The Four Seasons appeared twice on “American Bandstand” in 1963.
     The Four Seasons, a quartet of singers from New Jersey with front man Franki Valli and his famous falsetto voice, appeared on American Bandstand at least twice in 1963.  These “Jersey Boys” as they would come to be known years later from a famous stage production of that name, formed their group in 1960 as The Four Lovers.  They eventually became The Four Seasons, with Frankie Valli on lead, Bob Gaudio keyboards and tenor vocals, Tommy DeVito on lead guitar and baritone vocals, and Nick Massi on bass guitar and bass vocals.  By the time they appeared on American Bandstand in 1963, they were already stars, having released their first album in 1962 with the No. 1 hit single “Sherry,” followed by their second No. 1 hit, “Big Girls Don’t Cry” – both million-sellers.  The Four Season appeared twice on Bandstand in 1963 – once in February and once in March – performing “Walk Like a Man” on both occasions.  That song had been released in January 1963, but by March 2nd that year it had hit No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100, remaining there for three weeks and in the Top 40 for 12 weeks.  The Four Seasons would go on to become one of the more popular musical groups of that era, and for years thereafter, selling some 175 million records worldwide.

Lesley Gore, shown at 1964 TAMI concert, appeared on Bandstand, May 1963, singing “It’s My Party.”
Lesley Gore, shown at 1964 TAMI concert, appeared on Bandstand, May 1963, singing “It’s My Party.”
     In late May 1963, a 17 year-old New Jersey teenager named Lesley Gore (Lesley Sue Goldstein) made her first appearance on American Bandstand singing her soon-to-be No.1 hit, “It’s My Party.”  Just three months earlier, she was virtually unknown, performing locally at a Manhattan nightclub.  That’s when Quincy Jones, a producer with Mercury Records, had caught her performance.  By late February 1963, Jones came to Gore’s family home where she chose a demo song named “It’s My Party” to record for his label.  Six weeks later, the recording was finished and sent to record stores.

     But by June 1, 1963, after Gore made her national TV debut on Bandstand performing ”It’s My Party,” the song shot to No. 1 on the pop charts, remaining there for two weeks.  Gore would also have big subsequent follow-up hits, including “Judy’s Turn To Cry” and “You Don’t Own Me.”  And years, later, she would also be nominated for an Oscar for co-writing the 1980 song, “Out Here On My Own” from the movie Fame.

     The Righteous Brothers appeared on Bandstand in June 1963, but this was before their major stardom, coming at a time when they worked with a small recording company and then using the Moonglow label. Under that label, they produced two moderate hits: “Little Latin Lupe Lu” and “My Babe.”  Their big hit – “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin,” produced with studio wizard Phil Spector – would not come until 1965. 

The Righteous Brothers duo of Bill Medley and Bobby Hatfield. Click photo for separate story.
The Righteous Brothers duo of Bill Medley and Bobby Hatfield. Click photo for separate story.
     Among others appearing on Bandstand in June of 1963, were: Frankie Avalon, Chubby Checker, Bobby Vinton, and Nancy Sinatra.  James Brown also appeared that month performing his “Prisoner of Love,” as did Barbara Lewis with her hit, “Hello Stranger” and The Essex, with their hit,”Easier Said Than Done.”  The Essex were an interesting group for that time, composed as they were of five U.S. Marines: Walter Vickers, Rodney Taylor, Billy Hill, Rudolph Johnson, and female Marine, Anita Humes.  Stationed at Camp LeJeune in North Carolina, they cut a demo that landed them a contract with Roulette Records.  Their hit song, “Easier Said Than Done,” was written by William Linton and Larry Huff, recorded by the group in 20 minutes, and released in May 1963.  To the group’s surprise, it soared to No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart on July 6, sold more than one million copies, and garnered a gold disc from the recording industry.  In September1963, The Essex had another hit, “A Walkin’ Miracle,” which rose to No.12 on the pop charts.  The group appeared on American Bandstand June 7th, 1963.

Little Stevie Wonder appeared on Bandstand July 8, 1963.  Click photo for separate story.
Little Stevie Wonder appeared on Bandstand July 8, 1963. Click photo for separate story.
     Stevie Wonder, a young blind teenager out of Detroit, made his network television debut on American Bandstand on July 8, 1963, with a performance of his harmonica-with-vocals song, “Fingertips, Part 2.”  Wonder would go on to become a very popular music artist for decades, winning many Grammy awards, and continuing his success into the 21st century.  Major Lance appeared on Bandstand in September 1963 with a popular dance song called “Monkey Time,” written by Curtis Mayfield, a song that had risen to No. 8 on the pop charts that August. 

     In the latter part of 1963, Dick Clark’s American Bandstand had a contingent of “girl group” recording artists on the show– i.e., groups that were girl-led, all-girl composed, or had a “girl group” sound.  Among these were the Jaynetts, the Chiffons, Darlene Love, Dee Dee Sharp, Martha Reeves and the Vandellas, and the Ronettes.  Clark also gave local groups continued opportunity on his show such as The Dreamlovers, a Philadelphia doo-wop group that once backed Chubby Checker on “The Twist” and other songs.  This group appeared several times on Bandstand in 1963.

Dick Clark interviewing a young Little Richard on American Bandstand sometime in 1963 or 1964.
Dick Clark interviewing a young Little Richard on American Bandstand sometime in 1963 or 1964.
     Although American Bandstand was still an important force in the music industry of that day, its power wasn’t what it had been in the 1950s.  By September 1963, when the show went to its Saturday-only format, it wasn’t playing new recordings every day, which had been one of Bandstand’s big selling points in the music industry.  With its reduced air time and song plugging, the show lost some of its influence in the industry.  Still, through 1963 American Bandstand was the place where aspiring artists came to launch or enhance their music careers.  Bandstand would have many years remaining as a TV dance show, extending into the 1980s.

     The 1963 season, in any case, was the last year that American Bandstand would be broadcast from Philadelphia.  In early 1963, the live broadcasts were replaced by previously-taped shows, though still running five days a week.  In August, Bandstand ended its weekday broadcasts and instead, went to a Saturdays-only show for one hour, ending its years in Philadelphia with its final broadcasts in December 1963.  By February 1964, the show resumed broadcasting from Los Angeles, California, near Hollywood.  Clark by then had also been serving as a game show host, a part of his career that would grow in the years ahead.  At the time of Bandstand’s move west, Dick Clark was still a young man at age 34.

The Jaynettes appeared on Bandstand in 1963 with their song, "Sally, Go Round the Roses."
The Jaynettes appeared on Bandstand in 1963 with their song, "Sally, Go Round the Roses."
     The move to California and the show’s location near the growing music industry in the Los Angeles area, was beneficial in terms of Bandstand landing more musical guests.  And in terms of the youth culture at that time, California was becoming an important center of attention.  It was “where the action was,” as Clark would later explain.  “Everything was going on there.  The surfing craze was high on everybody’s list of things to do, whether you lived near water or not.  Everybody wanted to have bleached-blonde straight hair… So I figured I’d better get out [there].”

     Still, the 1963-1964 period became something of dividing line for Bandstand and the nation.  With the assassination of President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963, America fell into a period of mourning and national soul-searching.  And with the turn of the new year in 1964, the music began to change as well.  In February 1964, after the Beatles performed on The Ed Sullivan Show, “Beatlemania” swept the country.  Plain Vanilla rock ‘n roll was heading into some new territory, not the least of which would be drug and psychedelic influences. 

1962: Top left to right -  Martha Reeves, Annette Beard, Mary Wells & Dick Clark. Click for Martha & The Vandellas story.
1962: Top left to right - Martha Reeves, Annette Beard, Mary Wells & Dick Clark. Click for Martha & The Vandellas story.
     Although Clark and American Bandstand were then in California and would adapt with the changing times and fashion, after Bandstand left Philadelphia it would never again have quite the same dominance it enjoyed during the late 1950s and early 1960s.  As author John Jackson has put it in his American Bandstand book, 1964 became the year in which “Clark’s epic production began its steady diminution…to becoming…just another television show.”  Dick Clark, in any case, while continuing to host the Bandstand show for many years in California, was building his career in other areas, including game shows, television productions, and related entertainment businesses through his Dick Clark Productions, which he formed in 1957.

     What follows below is a listing of artists who appeared on American Bandstand in 1963 – the final Philadelphia year — along with a few Bandstand “top ten” lists from that year.  Artists appearing on Bandstand are listed by date, and in some cases, with the song each performed.  Other Bandstand-related stories at this website include, “At the Hop, 1957-1958,” “Bandstand Performers, 1957,” and “American Bandstand, 1956-2007,” the latter  providing  a general history of the show, Dick Clark, and his related businesses.  Thanks for visiting — and please consider supporting this website.  Thank you.
 - Jack Doyle.

 

“American Bandstand”
Selected Guests & Performers
1963

Dion DiMucci appeared on Bandstand in January 1963 showcasing “Ruby Baby.” Click for his story.
Dion DiMucci appeared on Bandstand in January 1963 showcasing “Ruby Baby.” Click for his story.
Skeeter Davis appeared twice on Bandstand in 1963, performing her song “The End of the World” in February.
Skeeter Davis appeared twice on Bandstand in 1963, performing her song “The End of the World” in February.
Surfing music was popular in the early 1960s, and Jan & Dean had a hit with “Surf City,” but appeared on ‘Bandstand’ in March 1963 with their song, “Linda.”
Surfing music was popular in the early 1960s, and Jan & Dean had a hit with “Surf City,” but appeared on ‘Bandstand’ in March 1963 with their song, “Linda.”
James Brown appeared on Bandstand in June 1963 showcasing “Prisoner of Love.” Click for his website.
James Brown appeared on Bandstand in June 1963 showcasing “Prisoner of Love.” Click for his website.
Folk group Peter Paul & Mary, appeared on Bandstand May 2, 1963 for their song, “Puff the Magic Dragon.”
Folk group Peter Paul & Mary, appeared on Bandstand May 2, 1963 for their song, “Puff the Magic Dragon.”
Bobby Vinton performed his song, “Blue on Blue,” when he appeared on Bandstand June 14, 1963.
Bobby Vinton performed his song, “Blue on Blue,” when he appeared on Bandstand June 14, 1963.
The Chiffons appeared on Bandstand October 12, 1963. Click for "Girl Groups" story.
The Chiffons appeared on Bandstand October 12, 1963. Click for "Girl Groups" story.
Link Wray and group appeared on Bandstand June 10, 1963 performing hit instrumental, “Jack the Ripper.”
Link Wray and group appeared on Bandstand June 10, 1963 performing hit instrumental, “Jack the Ripper.”
The Ronettes appeared on ‘Bandstand’ 2x in 1963 w/ big hit “Be My Baby.” Click on photo for their story.
The Ronettes appeared on ‘Bandstand’ 2x in 1963 w/ big hit “Be My Baby.” Click on photo for their story.

January 1963

Jan 2:  D. Warwick- “Don’t Make Me Over”
Jan 4:  Johnny Thunder- “Loop de Loop”
Jan 10:  B. Lynn- “You’re Gonna Need Me”
Jan 11:  Freddy Cannon- “Four Letter Man”
Jan 15:  The Dreamlovers
Jan 17:  Dion – “Ruby Baby”
Jan 18:  Paul & Paula- “Hey Paula”
Jan 22:  Barbara Lynn
Jan 23:  J. Mathis- “What Will Mary Say?”
Jan 28:  Steve Alaimo
Jan 29:  Conway Twitty- “The Pickup”
Jan 31:  Bobby Comstock & The Counts

February 1963

Feb 1:  The Dreamlovers
Feb 4:  Bobby Rydell- “Love is Blind”
Feb 6:  J. Darren- “Pin A Medal on Joey”
Feb 8:  Lou Christie- “The Gypsy Cried”
Feb 12:  Sandy Stewart
Feb 14:  S. Davis- “End Of The World”
Feb 19:  J. Ray- “Look Out, Chattanooga”
Feb 20:  Lou Christie- “The Gypsy Cried”
Feb 21:  Nancy Sinatra
Feb 22:  Four Seasons- “Walk Like A Man”
Feb 24:  N. Sedaka- “Alice in Wonderland”
Feb 25:  J. Tillotson-”Out of My Mind”
Feb 27:  Marcie Blaine
Feb 28:  Marcie Blane- “Bobby’s Girl”

March 1963

Mar 1: Four Seasons- “Walk Like a Man”
Mar 5: Bobby Comstock- “Let’s Stomp”
Mar 6: Connie Francis- “Follow the Boys”
Mar 8: Nancy Sinatra- “Like I Do”
Mar 12: Johnny Thunder
Mar 14: Jo Ann Campbell- “Mother…”
Mar 18: Anita Bryant- “Our Winter Love”
Mar 19: Timi Yuro- “Insult to Injury”
Mar 22: Wayne Newton
Mar 26: The Dreamlovers
Mar 28: Wayne Newton- “Heart…”
Mar 29: Jan & Dean- “Linda”

April 1963

Apr 2: B. Vinton- “Over the Mountain”
Apr 12: J. Soul- “If You Wanna Be…”
Apr 17: S. Alaimo- “Lifetime of…”
Apr 18: Al Martino- “I Love You Because”
Apr 19: Johnny Cymbal- “Mr Bass Man”
Apr 23: Bobby Lewis- “Intermission”
Apr 25: Freddy Cannon- “Patty Baby”
Apr 26: Frankie Avalon

May 1963

May 1: Mickey Callan
May 2: Peter, Paul & Mary- “Puff…”
May 3: Jimmy Clanton
May 7: N. Sedaka- “Let’s Go Steady…”
May 8: D. Love- “Today I Met Boy…”
May 14: Rockin’ Rebels
May 24: S. Davis- “…Saving My Love”
May 30: Lesley Gore- “It’s My Party”
May 31: B. Hyland- “…Afraid to Go Home”

June 1963

Jun 5: The Righteous Brothers
Jun 6: Dee Dee Sharp
Jun 7: Essex – “Easier Said Than Done”
Jun 10: Ray Stevens- “Harry The Ape”
Jun 11: Frankie Avalon
Jun 12: Chubby Checker- “Black Cloud”
Jun 13: T. Yuro- “Make the World…”
Jun 14: Bobby Vinton- “Blue on Blue”
Jun 17: Miami Beach Show
Jun 18: Nancy Sinatra- “One Way”
Jun 19: Steve Alaimo
Jun 20: Bill Anderson- “Still”
Jun 21: Guest info unavailable
Jun 26: James Brown- “Prisoner of Love”
Jun 27: Barbara Lewis- “Hello Stranger”
Jun 28: Paul & Paula- “First Quarrel”

July 1963

Jul 3: Dean Randolph- “False Love”
Jul 4: Joey Dee- “Dance, Dance, Dance”
Jul 5: Dee Dee Sharp- “…Cradle of Love”
Jul 8: Stevie Wonder – “Fingertips, Pt 2″
Jul 10: Link Wray- “Jack the Ripper”
Jul 11: Doris Troy
Jul 17: Freddy Cannon
Jul 22: Bobby Vinton
Jul 23: F. Cannon- “Everybody Monkey”
Jul 24: Roy Orbison- “Falling”
Jul 25: B. Hyland- “Afraid to Go Home”
Jul 26: Jimmy Clanton
Jul 29: Patty Duke (Patty Duke Show)
Jul 30: Mel Carter- “When a Boy…”
Jul 31: Frankie Avalon

August 1963

Aug 1: The Dovells- “Betty in Bermudas”
Aug 2: Freddie Scott- “Hey Girl”
Aug 5: Eddie Hodges- “Halfway”
Aug 6: D. D. Sharp- “Rock Me in The…”
Aug 7: Jo Ann Campbell
Aug 8: Wayne Newton- “Danke Schoen”
Aug 9: Steve Alaimo- “Don’t Let Sun…”
Aug 12: Al Martino- “Painted, Tainted…”
Aug 13: Roy Clark- “Tips of My Fingers”
Aug 14: Dick & Dee Dee- “Love is…”
Aug 15: Bandstand Fans Special
Aug 19: Duane Eddy- “… Lonely Guitar”
Aug 22: Dick & Dee Dee
Aug 23: B. Lynn- “…Laura’s Wedding”
Aug 29: Fats Domino- “Red Sails in Sunset”
Aug 30: Final Daily Show- Dick Clark

Bandstand “Top Ten” List
(30 August 1963)

1. “My Boyfriend’s Back!”- The Angels
2. “Hello Mudduh…”- Allan Sherman
3. “Fingertips”- Little Stevie Wonder
4. “Candy Girl”- The 4 Seasons
5. “Blowin’ in Wind”- Peter, Paul & Mary
6. “If I Had A Hammer”- Trini Lopez
7. “Judy’s Turn to Cry”- Lesley Gore
8. “Mockingbird”- Inez & Charlie Foxx
9. “More”- Kai Winding
10.”Denise”- Randy & The Rainbows

September 1963
(Saturday shows begin)

Sep 7: Neil Sedaka- “The Dreamer”
Sep 7: The Jaynettes- “Sally Go…Roses”
Sep 14: Dion- “Donna the Prima Donna”
Sep 14: Major Lance- “Monkey Time”
Sep 21: Skt. Davis- “Can’t Stay Mad…”
Sep 21: Garnett Mimms- “Cry Baby”
Sep 28: B. Rydell- “Let’s Make Love…”
Sep 28: The Ronettes- “Be My Baby”

October 1963

Oct 5: Dee Dee Sharp- “Wild”
Oct 5: Linda Scott- “Let’s Fall in Love”
Oct 12: The Chiffons- “A Love So Fine”
Oct 19: Peggy March- “…Follow Him”
Oct 19: Bill Anderson- “8 x 10″
Oct 26: The Busters- “Bust Out”
Oct 26: Freddy Cannon- “That’s What…”

Bandstand “Top Ten” List
(12 October 1963)

1. “Sugar Shack”- J. Gilmer & Fireballs
2. “Be My Baby”- The Ronettes
3. “Blue Velvet”- Bobby Vinton
4. “Cry Baby”- G. Mimms & Enchanters
5. “Sally, Go ‘Round…”- The Jaynetts
6. “Busted”- Ray Charles
7. “My Boyfriend’s Back”- The Angels
8. “Mean Woman Blues”- Roy Orbison
9. “Heat Wave”- Martha & Vandellas
10. “Donna the Prima Donna”- Dion

November 1963

Nov 2: Dale & Grace- “…Up to You”
Nov 2: Wayne Newton- “Shirl Girl”
Nov 9: Gene Pitney- “24 Hrs From Tulsa” 
Nov 9: Sunny & Sunglows- “Talk to Me”
Nov 16: Bobby Bare- “500 Miles…”
Nov 16: Brian Hyland- “Let Us Make…”
Nov 30: Dick Clark’s Celebrity Party

December 1963

Dec 7: Neil Sedaka – “Bad Girl”
Dec 7: Vito & Salutations- “Unchained…”
Dec 7: Chubby Checker- “Hooka Tooka”
Dec 21: Chubby Checker- “Lody Lo”
Dec 21: Donald Jenkins- “Adios”
Dec 28: Bobby Vinton- “Blue Velvet”
Dec 28: Patty Duke- Dick Clark interview

Bandstand “Top Ten” List
(21 December 1963)

1. “Dominique”- The Singing Nun
2. “Louie Louie”- The Kingsmen
3. “Don’t Have to Be a…” – Caravelles
4. “There! I Said it Again”- Bobby Vinton
5. “Since I Fell for You”- Lenny Welch
6. “Be True to Your School”- Beach Boys
7. “Drip Drop”- Dion
8. “…Leaving it Up to You” – Dale & Grace
9. “Everybody” – Tommy Roe
10. “Popsicles & Icicles” – The Murmaids

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Note:  This is not a complete list of all
1963 American Bandstand guests, as some
dates, artists and/or songs are missing.
Available sources have incomplete,
conflicting, or uncertain information.

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Date Posted: 30 April 2012
Last Update: 28 July 2013
Comments to: jdoyle@pophistorydig.com

Article Citation:
Jack Doyle, “Bandstand Performers: 1963,”
PopHistoryDig.com, April 30, 2012.

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Sources, Links & Additional Information

Roy Orbison appeared on “American Bandstand” June 24, 1963 performing his song, “Falling.”
Roy Orbison appeared on “American Bandstand” June 24, 1963 performing his song, “Falling.”
Barbara Lewis appeared on Bandstand, June 27, 1963, performing “Hello Stranger.” Click for separate story.
Barbara Lewis appeared on Bandstand, June 27, 1963, performing “Hello Stranger.” Click for separate story.

John A. Jackson, American Bandstand: Dick Clark and the Making of a Rock ‘n’ Roll Empire, New York: Oxford University Press, 1997.

Associated Press, “‘American Bandstand’ Honored for Its Age,” New York Times, September 16, 1987.

Hank Bordowitz, Turning Points in Rock and Roll, Citadel Press, 2004.

“Dionne Warwick,” in Holly George-Warren and Patricia Romanowski (eds), The Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll, Rolling Stone Press, New York, 3rd Edition, 2001, pp. 1046-1047.

“Don’t Make Me Over,” Wikipedia.org.

“The Four Seasons,” in Holly George-Warren and Patricia Romanowski (eds), The Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll, Rolling Stone Press, New York, 3rd Edition, 2001, pp. 346-347.

“The Four Seasons,” Wikipedia.org. 

“May 30, 1963: Lesley Gore Sings ‘It’s My Party’ on Bandstand,” History.com.

“Lesley Gore,” Wikipedia.org.

R. Buxton, “Dick Clark,” The Museum of American Broadcast Communications.

“American Bandstand,” The Museum of American Broadcast Communications.

“Dick Clark,” The Radio Hall of Fame.

American Bandstand articles at New York Daily News.

The Essex,”Wikipedia.org.

“Dick Clark Interview with Bobby Darin, 1963,” BobbyDarin.net.

“American Bandstand – Season 6 Episode Guide,” TV.com.

“American Bandstand – Season 7 Episode Guide,” OVGuide.com.

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Among dance shows that Dick Clark did in 1963 was the one photographed above –  a “Dick Clark Parade of Stars” show undertaken with CHUM radio in Toronto, Canada on July 19, 1963 at the Maple Leaf Gardens.
Among dance shows that Dick Clark did in 1963 was the one photographed above – a “Dick Clark Parade of Stars” show undertaken with CHUM radio in Toronto, Canada on July 19, 1963 at the Maple Leaf Gardens.

 

 

“Bandstand Performers”
1957

Dick Clark, in the late 1950s, at his podium station for the popular TV dance show, "American Bandstand."
Dick Clark, in the late 1950s, at his podium station for the popular TV dance show, "American Bandstand."
     In August 1957, American Bandstand, a new television show broadcast out of Philadelphia, PA, featured local teenagers dancing to the new rock ‘n roll music.  The show had just “gone national” on the ABC television network on August 5th.  With its new young host, Dick Clark, the show aired every day at 3 p.m. for an hour-and-a-half.  Within six months of its national debut, American Bandstand was picked up by 101 stations.  Soon there were about 20 million viewers tuning in, half of whom were adult.  Fan letters poured in by the tens of thousands.  Teenagers came to Philadelphia from wide and far for a chance to dance on the show.  But American Bandstand also became a place where new talent could be seen, as Clark allotted featured spots on each show for new acts to perform their songs.  “Perform,” in this case, is a generous term as the guest or guests typically “lyp-synced” or mouthed the words to their pre-recorded songs rather than performing them live.  They did, however, appear in person and typically sat with Clark in brief conversation, answering his questions about their music, where they were from, what they were doing next, etc.

"Tom & Jerry" (Simon & Garfunkel) appeared on "Bandstand" Nov 22, 1957 performing "Hey Schoolgirl," a song that hit No. 54 & sold 100,000 copies.
"Tom & Jerry" (Simon & Garfunkel) appeared on "Bandstand" Nov 22, 1957 performing "Hey Schoolgirl," a song that hit No. 54 & sold 100,000 copies.
     During American Bandstand’s first national season – which ran a short five months from its August opening – about 200 or so guests appeared.  Typically, one or two acts were scheduled for each show.  Among notable guests appearing that first season, some making their television debuts, were: Paul Anka, Chuck Berry, Sam Cooke, Bobby Darin, The Del-Vikings, The Diamonds, Buddy Holly, Johnny Mathis, Simon & Garfunkel( “Tom & Jerry”), Andy Williams, Jackie Wilson, and others.  Some guests appeared more than once that season, including: Frankie Avalon, The Chordettes, The Everly Brothers, The Four Coins, Bill Haley & the Comets, Jerry Lee Lewis, The Mello Kings, and Gene Vincent.  A few acts in 1957 launched national and international careers after appearing on Bandstand. Danny & The Juniors, for example, rose quickly to national notice shortly after an early December 1957 Bandstand appearance.  Their song, “At the Hop,” rose to the top of the music charts within weeks of their appearance. 

Dick Clark with Johnny Mathis on American Band-stand in Oct 1957.  Mathis released two singles in 1957: “Wonderful, Wonderful” & “It’s Not For Me To Say.”
Dick Clark with Johnny Mathis on American Band-stand in Oct 1957. Mathis released two singles in 1957: “Wonderful, Wonderful” & “It’s Not For Me To Say.”
     On December 5th, 1957, the Diamonds appeared with their song “the Stroll,” which kicked off a new kind of dance with the kids forming two lines facing each other with several yards of space between them, as dance couples then took turns “strolling” down this middle aisle.  Non-musical guests would also appear occasionally, as in the case of actor Hugh O’Brian from the ABC-TV series “The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp.”  O’Brian appeared on the October 25, 1957 show.  Some guests appeared only once and never emerged as national stars.  Among those who appeared in 1957, were artists from an older era of popular music that continued in a period of transition to rock ‘n roll music.  A listing of many of those who appeared on American Bandstand during its first national season appears below by show date, and when available, song performed.

Dick Clark interviewing the Everly Brothers at a “Bandstand” performance. They appeared at least twice in 1957 – Sept 13th & Dec 23rd, singing “Wake Up Little Susie” and other songs.
Dick Clark interviewing the Everly Brothers at a “Bandstand” performance. They appeared at least twice in 1957 – Sept 13th & Dec 23rd, singing “Wake Up Little Susie” and other songs.
     In addition to the regular American Bandstand weekday afternoon shows that aired in 1957, there were also a series of prime time American Bandstand TV shows broadcast on Monday evenings in the 7:30-8:00 p.m. time slot.  Bill Haley & The Comets, for example, appeared on the prime time show, October 28th, 1957; Mickey & Sylvia appeared there, November 25th, 1957.  The prime time shows, 13 in all that year, were much like the daytime show, with a bit more focus on the guests.  These shows appeared to be experimental and served to broaden the reach of Bandstand to more viewers who could not see the daytime version.  Some of these show dates are also included below.  In any case, in 1957, American Bandstand – with its nationally-broadcast television dance show and a daily spotlight on new musical talent – was helping to build the gigantic national and international business that would emerge around rock ‘n roll music.

     See also at this website, a more general background story on the history of American Bandstand, Dick Clark, and related businesses, 1956-2007.


American Bandstand
Guests & Performers
Aug-Dec, 1957


Paul Anka  – shown here on a Dutch record sleeve –  made his TV debut on American Bandstand August 7, 1957 singing his soon-to-be No.1 hit, “Diana.”
Paul Anka – shown here on a Dutch record sleeve – made his TV debut on American Bandstand August 7, 1957 singing his soon-to-be No.1 hit, “Diana.”
Buddy Holly & the Crickets – shown on an album compilation – appeared on ‘Bandstand’ August 26, 1957, singing ‘That’ll Be The Day.’
Buddy Holly & the Crickets – shown on an album compilation – appeared on ‘Bandstand’ August 26, 1957, singing ‘That’ll Be The Day.’
Jackie Wilson appeared on ‘American Bandstand’ Oct 4, 1957 performing ‘Reet Petite (the Finest Girl You Ever Wanna Meet).’
Jackie Wilson appeared on ‘American Bandstand’ Oct 4, 1957 performing ‘Reet Petite (the Finest Girl You Ever Wanna Meet).’
Jerry Lee Lewis, who played a hot piano, appeared 3 times on AB in 1957: Aug 19,  Oct 10, and Nov 4 singing “Great Balls of Fire” and other songs.
Jerry Lee Lewis, who played a hot piano, appeared 3 times on AB in 1957: Aug 19, Oct 10, and Nov 4 singing “Great Balls of Fire” and other songs.
Bobby Darin, who went from teen idol to Las Vegas nightclub act, appeared on Bandstand Dec 17, 1957 to perform “Call My Name.” Click for separate story.
Bobby Darin, who went from teen idol to Las Vegas nightclub act, appeared on Bandstand Dec 17, 1957 to perform “Call My Name.” Click for separate story.
"Mickey & Sylvia," who had a million-seller with "Love is Strange," appeared on Bandstand's evening show, Nov 25th, 1957. Click for separate story.
"Mickey & Sylvia," who had a million-seller with "Love is Strange," appeared on Bandstand's evening show, Nov 25th, 1957. Click for separate story.

August 1957

Aug 5: Billy Williams / The Chordettes
Aug 6: D. Hawkins – “Susie Q”/ D. Rondo
Aug 7: Paul Anka – “Diana”
Aug 9: Lee Andrews & the Hearts
Aug 12: Gene Vincent / The Four Coins
Aug 13: Jodie Sands / Sal Mineo
Aug 14: Rusty & Doug Kershaw
Aug 15: Lee Kane
Aug 16: Ted Newman
Aug 19: Jerry Lee Lewis / Jimmy Bowen
Aug 20: David Hill / Terri Stevens
Aug 21: Randy Starr
Aug 22: The Dubs
Aug 23: Steve Karmen
Aug 26: Buddy Holly / Doc Bagby
Aug 27: Johnny Nash
Aug 28: Eileen Barton / Matys Brothers
Aug 29: Malcolm Dodds & Tunedrops
Aug 30: The Frank Virtuoso Quintet

September 1957

Sep 2: Andy Williams / The Bobbettes
Sep 3: Mello-Kings – “Tonight, Tonight”
Sep 4: Libby Dean
Sep 5: Brian Fischer
Sep 6: The Mike Pedicin Quintet
Sep 9: The Diamonds
Sep 10: Jimmie Rodgers
Sep 11: Webb Pierce
Sep 12: Nick Noble / The Tune Weavers
Sep 13: Everly Brothers – “…Little Suzie”
Sep 16: The Crew-Cuts / Ted Newman
Sep 17: Tom Leonetti / Bobby Charles
Sep 18: Frankie Avalon / Rod Willis
Sep 19: Dale Hawkins / Bob Jaxson
Sep 20: Don Rondo / The Poni-Tails
Sep 23: The Playmates
Sep 24: Dick Lindy
Sep 25: Eileen Rodgers
Sep 26: The Rays
Sep 27: Bob Crewe
Sep 30: Sonny James

October 1957

Oct 1: Cathy Carr
Oct 2: Bobby Brooks
Oct 3: Marvin Rainwater
Oct 4: Jackie Wilson – “Reet Petite”
Oct 7: The Shepherd Sisters
Oct 7: The Chordettes*
Oct 8: The Chordettes/Chuck Reed
Oct 9: Johnny Mathis/Andy Williams
Oct 10: J. Lee Lewis/Thurston Harris
Oct 11: Del-Vikings/Teddy Randazzo
Oct 14: The Four Coins
Oct 14: Bandstand evening show*
Oct 15: Carol Jarvis
Oct 16: Mello-Kings/Lou Connettie
Oct 17: Artie Wayne
Oct 18: No guest info
Oct 21: Five Satins / Rover Boys
Oct 21: Billy Williams*
Oct 22: Romaine Brown/Robin Hood
Oct 23: Georgia Gibbs
Oct 24: Cathy Carr/Vernon Taylor
Oct 25: Hugh O’Brian
Oct 26: Gene Vincent
Oct 28: Bill Haley & Comets*
Oct 29: Bonnie Guitar/DeJohn Sisters
Oct 30: Billy Miles / Jill Whitney
Oct 31:  4 Top Hatters / Bob Grabeau

November 1957

Nov 1: The Four Esquires
Nov 4: Jerry Lee Lewis/The Bachelors
Nov 4: The Shepherd Sisters*
Nov 5: J. Bennett / Mitzi Mason
Nov 6: Jerry Reed
Nov 7: Tommy Prisco
Nov 8: Chuck Berry / Lu Ann Simms
Nov 11: Paul Carr & Fran Lori
Nov 11: Joni James*
Nov 12: Joni James
Nov 13: Janice Harper
Nov 14: Jim Lowe / Wilburn Bros.
Nov 15: Dick Duane / Gary Trexler
Nov 18: No guest info
Nov 18: Am Bandstand evening show*
Nov 19: Marty Robbins
Nov 20: Rusty Draper
Nov 21: The Crickets
Nov 22: Tom & Jerry
Nov 25: Guy Pastor
Nov 25: Mickey & Sylvia*
Nov 26: Sunny Gale
Nov 27: Bill Haley and His Comets
Nov 28: Paul Hampton
Nov 29: Ronnie Self

December 1957

Dec 2: Bill Craddock / Sam Cooke
Dec 2: No Guest information*
Dec 3: No Guest information
Dec 4: Jimmie Dee / Danny & Juniors
Dec 5: The Diamonds / Helen Curtis
Dec 6: Terry Noland
Dec 9: The Sprouts
Dec 9: Bill Justis Combo- “Raunchy”*
Dec 10: Kay Armen
Dec 11: Randy Starr
Dec 12: Frankie Avalon
Dec 13: Gene Nash
Dec 16: Gene Vincent & Blue Caps
Dec 16: Sonny James*
Dec 17: Bobby Darin- “Call My Name”
Dec 18: Georgia Gibbs
Dec 19: Jerry Vale
Dec 20: The Twin-Tones
Dec 23: Johnny Crawford /4 Esquires
Dec 23: The Everly Brothers*
Dec 24: Mello Kings- “Tonight, Tonight”
Dec 25: Mike Pedicin Quartet
Dec 26: Patti Page / Four Esquires
Dec 27: Will Glahe / The Techinques
Dec 30: Bob Jaxon / Lee Allen
Dec 30: N. “Thin Man” Watts*
Dec 31: Fontaine Sisters / Tina Robin

______________________________

Note: This is not a complete list of all 1957 American Bandstand guests for the “national” season, as some dates are missing and a few have incomplete or uncertain information.

*American Bandstand evening TV show, 7:30pm.

______________________________

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Date Posted: 12 August 2010
Last Update: 19 April 2012
Comments to:  jdoyle@pophistorydig.com

Article Citation:
Jack Doyle, “Bandstand Performers, 1957,”
PopHistoryDig.com, August 12, 2010.

________________________________


 


Sources, Links & Additional Information

The Mello-Kings appeared twice on Bandstand in 1957 performing ‘Tonite, Tonite”(later corrected to “Tonight, Tonight”).  Despite rising only to No.77 on the pop charts, the song remains a Doo Wop favorite.
The Mello-Kings appeared twice on Bandstand in 1957 performing ‘Tonite, Tonite”(later corrected to “Tonight, Tonight”). Despite rising only to No.77 on the pop charts, the song remains a Doo Wop favorite.
Chuck Berry, shown here in another performance, made his national TV debut on American Bandstand Nov. 8, 1957 singing “Rock and Roll Music.”
Chuck Berry, shown here in another performance, made his national TV debut on American Bandstand Nov. 8, 1957 singing “Rock and Roll Music.”
Danny & The Juniors rose to national fame after they appeared on Bandstand as a substitute act in early December 1957, singing "At The Hop," which soared to No.1. Click for separate story.
Danny & The Juniors rose to national fame after they appeared on Bandstand as a substitute act in early December 1957, singing "At The Hop," which soared to No.1. Click for separate story.
Bill Haley and his Comets, one of the more famous rock ‘n roll acts by 1957, appeared on Bandstand’s prime time show Oct 28th and on the regular show, Nov 27th 1957.
Bill Haley and his Comets, one of the more famous rock ‘n roll acts by 1957, appeared on Bandstand’s prime time show Oct 28th and on the regular show, Nov 27th 1957.
The Chordettes appeared on the first nationally televised “American Bandstand” show, August 5, 1957. Their No. 2 national hit, “Lollipop,” came in 1958.
The Chordettes appeared on the first nationally televised “American Bandstand” show, August 5, 1957. Their No. 2 national hit, “Lollipop,” came in 1958.

John A. Jackson, American Bandstand: Dick Clark and the Making of a Rock ‘n’ Roll Empire, New York: Oxford University Press, 1997.

Hank Bordowitz, Turning Points in Rock and Roll, Citadel Press, 2004.

“Facing the Music,” Time, Monday, November 30, 1959.

“Teen-Agers’ Dreamboat,” New York Times, March 5, 1960.

“American Bandstand” and “Dick Clark,” The Museum of American Broadcast Communications.

Dick Clark,” The Radio Hall of Fame.

American Bandstand episodes, TV.com.

Susan Bickelhaupt, TV Week 3, “Growing Up With Bandstand,” Boston Globe, May 10, 1992.

Murray Dubin, “Fifty Years Ago, American Bandstand Was Born in Philadelphia,” Philadelphia Inquirer, May 3, 2002, p. D-1.

Bill Keveney, “American Bandstand: Hopping After 50 Years.” USA Today, May 2, 2002: p. D-3.

William Robbins, “Philadelphians Swing to 50′s Rock.” New York Times, July 1, 1982. p. A-12.

Tom Shales, “Dick Clark! American Bandstand,” Washington Post, February 4, 1977, p. B-1.

“Tall, That’s All,” Time, Monday, April 14, 1958.

“Facing the Music,” Time, Monday, Nov. 30, 1959.

Summary of the National Register of Historic Places Nomination for American Bandstand building, WFIL and WHYY studios, 4548 Market St., Philadelphia., Pennsylvania, July 28, 1986.

“American Bandstand” and “Dick Clark,” The Museum of American Broadcast Communications.

“Dick Clark,” The Radio Hall of Fame.

Richard Corliss, “Philly Fifties: Rock ‘n Radio,” Saturday, July 14, 2001.

Ginia Bellafante, “Ultrasuede Is Funny – VH-1′s Reruns of American Bandstand Prove the Hootie Network Can Outwit MTV,” Time, Monday, April 22, 1996.

Fred Goodman, “Roll Over, Beethoven: How Dick Clark Taught American Parents not to be Afraid of Rock-and-Roll and Made a Fortune in the Process,” Dick Clark and the Making of a Rock ‘n’ Roll Empire, Book Review, New York Times, October 26, 1997

Thomas Heath and Howard Schneider, “Snyder Adds A TV Icon To His Empire, “Washington Post, Wednesday, June 20, 2007, P. D-1.

Dick Clark and Richard Robinson, Rock, Roll & Remember, Thomas Y. Crowell, Publisher, 1976.

Robert Stephen Spitz, Rock, Roll & Remember, Book Review, New York Times, October 24, 1976.

Ken Emerson, “The Spin on Bandstand – Music, TV and Popular Culture Learned to Swing to the Beat of a Different Drummer: Big Bucks,” Los Angeles Times, August 5, 2007.

A documentary film entitled The Wages of Spin, focuses on the history of American Bandstand, the 1950s payola scandal, and Dick Clark. A preview clip from that documentary is available at You Tube and additional information is found at Character Driven Films.

Dick Clark,” Wikipedia. org.

American Bandstand,” Wikipedia.org.

________________________________






“At The Hop”
1957-1958

Danny & The Juniors – from left, Danny Rapp, Dave White, Joe Terranova, and Frank Maffei – rose to fame in the late 1950s with “At The Hop.”
Danny & The Juniors – from left, Danny Rapp, Dave White, Joe Terranova, and Frank Maffei – rose to fame in the late 1950s with “At The Hop.”
     They began singing on Philadelphia street corners in the mid-1950s. They were just young kids at the time — 14 and 15 years old, attending John Bartram High School.  They were a foursome: Danny Rapp, Dave White, Frank Maffei, and Joe Terranova.

     Dave White had helped form the group early on.  He was the son of a show business couple who did an acrobatic routine.  Dave had hung out with some black kids in the area who were then singing a new kind of harmony.  “I knew church music, and I knew how to read music,” White would later recount to the Los Angles Times.  “They taught me the R&B and rock ‘n’ roll element.  I was so excited about it that I went around and found guys in my neighborhood who could sing.”

     The four boys sang at school parties and other local functions.  They practiced whenever they found time – in their cars, in the school hallways, wherever.  One night they decided to go to a street corner where a local record producer named John Madara lived.  After telling the boys to “get lost” a few times, Madara finally went downstairs for a listen.  The boys weren’t bad, he thought to himself.  In fact, they were good enough for an introduction to local disc jockey, Larry Brown, and his partner, Artie Singer, who had a record label, Singular Records.  It was 1957.


The young and hopeful Danny & The Juniors in a recording studio, 1957.
The young and hopeful Danny & The Juniors in a recording studio, 1957.
     At the time, the boys called themselves the Juvenaires, and they had come up with a couple of songs.  One was a ballad titled “Sometimes.”  Another was a dance tune titled “Do the Bop,” written by group member Dave White.  Artie Singer liked “Do the Bop,” and had the group soon cut a demo for him to test with local DJs.  Singer took the record to a friend for an opinion – a friend who happened to be Dick Clark of the new Philadelphia TV dance show, American Bandstand

     Clark, in addition to hosting Bandstand, was also a radio DJ.  Danny and the Juniors’ member Joe Terranova, who later renamed himself Joe Terri, recalled that the Philadelphia record business at that time was pretty hot.  Producers were turning out new recordings by the dozens.  And when the local DJs would give them air time, “they would sell 50,000-60,000 copies,” said Terri.  “They really didn’t care if it was a national hit or not.  They were making money doing it that way.”


First Record

The first recording of “At The Hop” in 1957 was on the Singular Records label of Philadelphia.
The first recording of “At The Hop” in 1957 was on the Singular Records label of Philadelphia.
     Dick Clark liked what he heard in the music that Artie Singer had brough him, but he offered two suggestions: that the boys shorten the name of their group from the Juvenairs to the Juniors, and that they change the term “bop,” used in “Do The Bop,” to something else.  Clark explained that the kids on Bandstand were then doing a dance called the Bop.  “But these dances come and go quickly,” said Clark, suggesting that the group change the word “bop” to “hop.”  Record hops, said Clark, “are gonna be around for a long, long time.”  In fact, part of Dick Clark’s lucrative career in the 1950s and 1960s involved sponsoring record hops, or “sock hops” as they were sometimes called.  In any case, with Clark’s advice, the Juniors’ song was renamed “At The Hop.”  It was then re-recorded and the group also changed their name to Danny & The Juniors.  Producer Artie Singer put the record out on his Singular Records label.  In a 2007 You Tube clip, from a longer documentary on Dick Clark and the payola scandal, Singer says on camera that Dick Clark asked for 50 percent of publication rights to “At The Hop” as a condition for playing the record.  But when “At the Hop” first came out, it didn’t get much attention.  That would soon change, however.

 

After Danny & the Juniors appeared on ‘Bandstand’ in Dec 1957, ABC’s Paramount record label acquired the rights to “At The Hop,” which became a No.1 hit, selling 2 million copies.
After Danny & the Juniors appeared on ‘Bandstand’ in Dec 1957, ABC’s Paramount record label acquired the rights to “At The Hop,” which became a No.1 hit, selling 2 million copies.
Bandstand Calls

     Dick Clark’s Bandstand TV show, meanwhile, had taken off.  Beginning as a locally-broadcast Philadelphia show, Bandstand had become the highest rated local daytime show in the nation.  Network TV executives in New York had taken notice.  The ABC network decided to take the show national.  By August 1957, now called American Bandstand, ABC began broadcasting the show nationwide at 3 p.m. for an hour-and-a-half.  Within six months of going national, American Bandstand was picked up by 101 stations.  Twenty million viewers were now tuning in, and 20,000-to-45,000 fan letters were arriving each week.  Teenagers came from all over the country to dance on the show.  But Bandstand was also a place where new talent could be seen; a place where aspiring artists could get their start.  Danny & The Juniors, still laboring in the back bench of struggling  Philadelphia singing groups, were about to get a big break.

Danny & the Juniors appearing on “American Bandstand,” with Dick Clark at the podium, 1950s.
Danny & the Juniors appearing on “American Bandstand,” with Dick Clark at the podium, 1950s.
     On December 2, 1957, Singer got a somewhat frantic phone call from Dick Clark.  A singing group scheduled to appear on Bandstand – said to have been Little Anthony & The Imperials – had cancelled and Clark needed a fill-in act imme- diately.  Singer sent over Danny & the Juniors who did an on-air lip-sync performance of their new song, “At the Hop.”  After the performance, the Bandstand switchboard lit up with hundreds of callers wanting to know about the group and the new song.  ABC’s Paramount record label quickly became aware of the popular new song, bought up the master recordings, and re-issued the single under its ABC-Paramount label.  By December 9th, 1957– a week after Danny & The Juniors had made their “emergency” fill-in appearance on Bandstand – “At The Hop” hit the Billboard pop chart, and within a month it was the No. 1 record in America.


Record sleeve for Danny & the Juniors’ extended play 45 rpm with four songs: "At The Hop," "Rock and Roll Is Here To Stay," "Sometimes" and "School Boy Romance," 1958.
Record sleeve for Danny & the Juniors’ extended play 45 rpm with four songs: "At The Hop," "Rock and Roll Is Here To Stay," "Sometimes" and "School Boy Romance," 1958.
     “Overnight, we went from being unknowns to music stars,” Joe Terry would recall years later.  “At the Hop” topped the U.S. charts for five weeks and sold 2 million copies around the world, reaching the No. 1 spot on the pop, country, and R& B charts.  Danny & the Juniors were labeled Best New Group of 1957.  Early in 1958, Dick Clark presented Danny & the Juniors with a gold record for “At The Hop” during an American Bandstand TV show — the show where the boys had made their national debut.  According to one listing at Billboard magazine, “At The Hop” is ranked the 23rd all-time, best-selling record.  On Band- stand, meanwhile, Danny and the Juniors  became frequent guests on the nationally- telecast show, reportedly making dozens of appearances.  They also appeared on other television shows.  On January 2, 1958, they appeared on “The Pat Boone Chevy Showroom” singing “At The Hop.”  They also made appearances on “The Patti Page Big Record Show” and “Nashville Now,” among others.  And they toured with famous radio DJ, Alan Freed, and his rock ‘n roll revue.  In June 1958 they made their Hollywood debut in the Columbia Pictures’ film, Let’s Rock, starring Julius LaRosa, who plays a mainstream singer attempting to fight off the rising new sound of rock ‘n roll music.

Life Changes

Danny & the Juniors performing in the late 1950s.
Danny & the Juniors performing in the late 1950s.
     After “At the Hop” had risen to top the charts, and the group had a national hit, life for the four young Philadelphia teenagers quickly changed.  In a retrospective interview with Joe Terry (Terranova) years later, some of the group’s early experiences were described:

Q: “How did life change for you when ‘At The Hop’ went to number one?”

A: “We had some major decisions to make.  Myself, being that I was still in high school, so I had to decide whether I was gonna’ come out of high school and forego a college education and go into show business.  So, life changed drastically.  My goal was to go to Drexel University and become a draftsman / architect.  That was a big decision that we all had to make.  Dave had a scholarship to one of the universities.  I don’t think Frank had any college plans, nor Danny.  We went into a world where we were working tours almost every night for at least a year and a half.  So, you give up your teen-age youth and become an entertainer.  And that’s what happened…”.

Record sleeve cover for Danny & The Juniors’ 1958 song, “Rock and Roll is Here to Stay.”
Record sleeve cover for Danny & The Juniors’ 1958 song, “Rock and Roll is Here to Stay.”
Second Hit

     The follow up to “At The Hop” was a song called “Rock ‘n Roll Is Here to Stay,” which also has its own asterisk in rock ‘n roll history.  In 1957-58, rock ‘n roll music wasn’t being well received throughout all corners of America.  On T.V. in 1957, for example, Ed Sullivan’s producers decided that Elvis Presley could only be seen on camera from the waist up, as they considered his hip movements too suggestive.  In Chicago that year, Car- dinal Stritch of the Catholic archdiocese, prohibited all rock ‘n roll music from the church’s schools, fearing that “its rhythms encourage young people to behave in a hedonistic manner.”  And in January 1958, St. Louis radio station KWK, had all rock ‘n roll music banned from its play list.  The disc jockeys there – during a much-promoted “record-breaking” week – ceremoni- ously gave every rock ‘n roll record in the station’s library a “farewell spin” before smashing them to pieces.  The station manager, Robert Convey, called the action “a simple weeding out of undesirable music.”Danny & the Juniors’ “Rock ‘n Roll Is Here to Stay,” was written in re- sponse to St. Louis KWK radio station’s ban on rock ‘n roll music and its on-air smashing of records.  Danny and Juniors “Rock ‘n’ Roll Is Here to Stay” was reportedly written in response to the radio station’s actions, and for a time, the song became something of a rock ‘n roll anthem.  Written by Dave White, the song rose to No.19 on the music charts and became the group’s only other U.S. Top 20 hit.  The song would also be used in the 1978 film soundtrack for Grease.

     In 1960, Danny & the Juniors were signed to Dick Clark’s Swan Records label and they released “Twistin’ USA,” which made it into the Top 40, becoming their final hit single.  They went on to release more singles, including  “Pony Express” and nine other songs that would chart on Billboard’s Hot 100 list, but none of these repeated the success of their first two songs.  “At The Hop,” however, would live again in future years, and would come into vogue on several occasions as rock ‘n roll nostalgia emerged in the U.S. and U.K.

     In the 1973 movie, American Graffiti, which was set in part the late 1950s rock ‘n roll era, a scene at a senior class dance is featured with a look-alike band playing Danny & the Juniors’ “At the Hop” song.  In 1976, nearly 20 years after its debut, “At the Hop” was re-issued in Britain where a wave of 1950s nostalgia had taken hold, propelling the tune back on the charts, reaching No. 39.


Later Years

CD label for “Back to the Hop,” a collection of 26 various recorded and studio cuts of Danny & The Juniors’ music with Swan Records during the 1960-1962 period, by Roller Coaster Records, U.K., 1995 and as MP3 in 2003.
CD label for “Back to the Hop,” a collection of 26 various recorded and studio cuts of Danny & The Juniors’ music with Swan Records during the 1960-1962 period, by Roller Coaster Records, U.K., 1995 and as MP3 in 2003.
     In later years, after their prime-time hit-making, the members of Danny & the Juniors went their separate ways, some not far from Philadelphia or the music business.  For a time in the 1970s Danny Rapp and Joe Terranova had an “oldies” show on WCAM radio in Camden, New Jersey.  Frank Maffei went on to become an optometrist.  Dave White continued co-writing music with John Madara in Philadelphia, producing hit songs such as: “The Fly” by Chubby Checker; “One, Two, Three” by Len Barry of The Dovells; and “You Don’t Own Me” by Leslie Gore.  Lead singer Danny Rapp became assistant manager at a toy factory for a time, and would return to performing in the early 1980s up until the time of his April 1983 death (by suicide, see below) in Parker, Arizona. 

     Dave White Tricker (his full name) and Madara split up in the mid-60s, and White hit the skids for a time and couldn’t pay the rent. So he moved to a New Jersey farmhouse and began working with a rock band called Crystal Mansion.  About that time, his old singing buddy, Danny Rapp made him an offer to join a reunited Danny and the Juniors for some Las Vegas work organized by Dick Clark.  “Danny called me up and said, ‘We can get $10,000 a week,’ and I didn’t have two cents,” White said, describing the call in a later interview.  But White decided not to rejoin Danny, and in 1971 released a solo album in the mellow singer genre, but it was not a chart-buster.  Then in 1978, rock ‘n roll nostalgia took off, and “At the Hop” found its way onto the hit soundtrack for Grease, yielding songwriting royalties for White.  His Crystal Mansion group, meanwhile, signed a recording deal with 20th Century Fox records.  White then went to Los Angeles and pumped his royalty money into his new band.  But soon, the money ran out.  “All of a sudden my sixty grand that I got from Grease [was] gone.”  Crystal Mansion, meanwhile, was put on the backburner at Fox and White then took some film courses at UCLA.  In 1982, White again met Danny Rapp, this time at a Lake Tahoe lounge where Danny was then performing with a new lineup of Juniors.  The brief reunion went well, and White even went onstage and sang a couple of numbers with the group, but decided against going back with Danny, although tempting at time.  White had resolved to himself he would only go back on the road if he had to, as a last resort.  His songwriting royalties from what he had written in the ’50s and early ’60s was enough to keep him afloat.

Danny’s Suicide
1983

     In early April 1983, in a motel room in Quartzsite, Arizona near Pheonix, the body of Danny Rapp was found.  He was the victim of an apparent gunshot suicide.  Rapp had been doing some performing in the early 1980s, and was then in Pheonix for a schedule of shows.  But Rapp had not been seen for a few days, and failed to appear for scheduled performances in Pheo- nix.  As the frontman for Danny & the Juniors, Rapp sang lead with the rock n roll group until they broke up in the mid-1960s.  In the 1970s he briefly had a radio show in Camden, New Jersey.  In later years, he became assistant manager in a toy factory.  Rapp was born in Philadelphia in May 1941.  He was 42 years old at the time of his death.

     Joe Terry, meanwhile, had received a phone call from Danny Rapp in Arizona around Christmas of 1982, shortly before his suicide.  “He was just on the road, pounding it out,” Terry said.  “He said, ‘I’m tired, I’m coming off the road.’  There was no hint, other than the fact he was tired, that he was going to do anything like that.”  White and Terry later described Rapp as troubled, given to drinking binges on occasion and other out-of-control behavior.  “He had a lot of personal problems — a divorce he never quite got over,” Terry would say.

     By the late 1980s, Dave White was trying to score with some music video work.  Still, his old music was keeping him afloat.  The songs he had written with Madara in the 1960s would be periodically revived by new artists, helping his songwriter royalties to flow again.  In 1988, “You Don’t Own Me,” originally scored in the mid-1960s, had a lucrative revival in a new version by the British group Blow Monkeys – a song that was also included on the megahit Dirty Dancing sound track album.  That one song produced more than $50,000 in royalties for White, with more in the offing.  At the time, White then moved from a North Hollywood trailer park to a Newport Beach condo.  He acknowledged that the periodic revival of his songs was “like an annuity or something,” helping to pay the bills.  “It’s kept me going for 30 years, and I really appreciate it, ” he explained in 1988.  “But you never know what you’re going to make next year. There was a time in there when I hardly made any money.  Nostalgia wasn’t in…. Now, it’s hot again, but nostalgia could go into a decline.  That’s why I’ve been trying real hard the last few years to come up with new hits.”

     In later years, a reformed Danny & the Juniors featuring Joe Terry (Terranova), Frank Maffei and his brother, Bobby Maffei, began performing on the oldies circuit.  This group has continued performing into the 2000s.  In 2002, for example, they performed in Honolulu, Hawaii at the Blaisdell Arena in a nostalgia-filled show that also featured the reformed oldies groups including the Coasters, Bill Haley’s Comets, and the Drifters.


Sha-Na-Na

CD cover for “Whole Lotta Sha-Na-Na” album of 2006, first issued, Nov 1997.
CD cover for “Whole Lotta Sha-Na-Na” album of 2006, first issued, Nov 1997.
     Other progeny of the “At-The-Hop” sound and the Danny & the Juniors legacy would continue in the musical world in various forms – if only as part parody.  In addition to Dave White’s songwriting and later hits, the group’s saxaphonist, Lennie Baker, helped form a rock ‘n roll nostalgia/parody group named Sha-Na-Na.  This group played “At The Hop” at the historic Woodstock concert in 1969.  The new group was relatively unknown at the time and were performing covers of ’50s hits and “doo-wop” songs, including Danny & The Junior’s “Rock and Roll is Here to Stay.”  At Woodstock, their performance of “At The Hop,” which preceded Jimi Hendrix, helped launch their career.  Sha-Na-Na, among other things, would go on to have their own TV show, running from 1977 to 1982.  They also appeared in the movie Grease and performed several songs in that film, including  “Rock and Roll is Here to Stay.”  Sha-Na-Na, in fact, would release 21 albums and remain active, with varying personnel, into the 2000s.

Theater marquee announcing acts in an Alan Freed rock 'n roll show, 1950s.
Theater marquee announcing acts in an Alan Freed rock 'n roll show, 1950s.
     For more stories at this website on the history of popular music and its various uses in advertising, politics, and film, go to the “Annals of Music” category page, or visit the Home Page for other story choices.  Thanks for visiting — and please consider supporting this website. Thank you. — Jack Doyle.

______________________

Date Posted: 12 August 2010
Last Update: 12 May 2013
Comments to:  jdoyle@pophistorydig.com

Article Citation:
Jack Doyle, “At the Hop, 1957-58,”
PopHistoryDig.com, August 12, 2010

____________________________




Sources , Links & Additional Information

CD cover for Billboard’s “Top Rock ‘n’ Roll Hits of 1958”  – Rhino / Wea, October 1990.
CD cover for Billboard’s “Top Rock ‘n’ Roll Hits of 1958” – Rhino / Wea, October 1990.
“Danny and the Juniors,” in Holly George-Warren and Patricia Romanowski (eds), The Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll, Rolling Stone Press, New York, 3rd Edition, 2001, pp. 236-237.

Gary James, “Interview with Joe Terry of Danny & The Juniors,” ClassicBands.com.

Jay Warner, “Danny & the Juniors,” Vocal Group Hall of Fame, Induction, 2003.

Mick Patrick, “John Madara Interview,” Spectro Pop.com

At least one 1958 tape of “At the Hop” by Danny & The Juniors has been captured in a You Tube clip.

Jay Warner, “Danny and The Juniors,” American Singing Groups: A History From 1940s to Today, 2006, New York: Hal Leonard Corp.,. pp. 142-143.

Danny & The Juniors
Dick Clark Show Appearances
1957-1963

American Bandstand
December 2, 1957
June 4, 1958
September 12, 1958
May 10, 1960
May 10, 1961
March 1,1963

The Dick Clark Show
February 22,1958
June 7, 1958
June 21, 1958
October 11, 1958
September 3, 1960

________________________
*Not a complete listing, as the group made numerous appearances on Dick Clark shows.

Danny and The Juniors website.

“Danny & The Juniors,”ThatPhillySound.com.

“Danny & The Juniors,” Wikipedia.org.

“Phila. Singer Danny Rapp, 42,” Philadelphia Inquir- er, April 6, 1983, p. D-11.

Associated Press, “Singer’s Body Identified,” April 7, 1983.

Tim Ryan, “At The Hop,” Honolulu Star-Bulletin, Thursday, September 26, 2002.

Mike Boehm, ‘At the Hop’: A Lesson in Staying Power,” Los Angeles Times, March 6, 1988.

“Flip Side of Rock ‘n’ Roll,” Los Angeles Times, March 12, 1988.

David White (musician),” Wikipedia.org.

A documentary film, The Wages of Spin, chronicles the Philadelphia music scene from 1952 thru 1963.  Dick Clark and American Bandstand are covered in the film, as well as the payola scandal of the late 1950s, including some film clips of the Congressional payola hearings.  A clip from that film is available at You Tube.  See also CharacterDrivenFilms.com.

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“American Bandstand”
1956-2007

Dick Clark at his DJ post in the 1950s.  "I don't make culture," he reportedly said at one point, "I sell it."
Dick Clark at his DJ post in the 1950s. "I don't make culture," he reportedly said at one point, "I sell it."
      On July 7, 1956, a young radio disc jockey named Dick Clark made his first appearance hosting an afternoon TV show called Bandstand.  Broad- cast from Philadelphia, the show had originally begun in 1952.  Bandstand played the new rock ‘n roll music and featured kids from local high schools dancing to the music.  When it first began, the dancing was almost accidental, but local TV viewers called in saying they liked watching “those young people dancing.”  As the show’s new host, Clark made the most of that novelty, and took Bandstand to the national level.  The son of a radio-station owner in Utica, N.Y., Dick Clark had been a radio disc jockey as a student at Syracuse University.  By 1951, when he landed a job at ABC’s WFIL station in Philadelphia, he worked in radio, regarded as too youthful looking to be a credible TV newscaster. Clark’s big break came when the station decided to replace former Bandstand host Bob Horn.  A youngish-looking 26 when he took over, Clark quickly made the show his own. He featured musical guests lip-synching their songs and used his teenage audience to “rate” new records.  Local audiences loved the show.

       American Bandstand, late -1950s-early-1960s.
American Bandstand, late -1950s-early-1960s.
      Bandstand, out of Philadelphia, soon became the highest rated local daytime TV show in the nation. That got the attention of network executives in New York. By August 1957, now called American Bandstand, ABC began broadcasting the show nationwide at 3 p.m. for an hour-and-a-half. Within six months of going national, American Bandstand was picked up by 101 stations. Twenty million viewers were now tuning in, half of whom were adult. The show was also receiving 20,000 to 45,000 fan letters a week. Teenagers came to Philadelphia from wide and far for a chance to dance on the show. Bandstand also became known as a place where new talent could be seen; a place where aspiring artists could get their start. On the November 22, 1957 show, for example, two young singers using the name “Tom & Jerry” appeared. The duo would later become known as Simon & Garfunkel. New dances were often introduced on the show. It was on Bandstand that Chubby Checker brought “the Twist” to the nation in the summer of 1960. Bandstand’s “regular” dance couples approached daytime soap-opera fame, and in the 1950s and 1960s they were written about regularly in teen magazines, as was Clark and the show.
Clark interviewing singer Bobby Rydell, 1958.
Clark interviewing singer Bobby Rydell, 1958.
It didn’t hurt, of course, that Bandstand‘s WFIL-TV station was owned by the Walter Annenberg empire, which also included, among other media outlets, TV Guide and Seventeen magazine for girls. Seventeen had a regular column on Bandstand, “written” by one of the show’s regulars. And TV Guide put Clark’s telegenic face on its cover several times during the 1950s (see sample covers below).

 

Brokering Rock ‘n Roll

     American Bandstand also played another critical role –  especially for mainstream culture and the music business. It helped make America more receptive to rock ‘n roll, a music genre not then accepted as it is today.  “From the time it hit the national airwaves in 1957,” observes rock historian Hank Bordowitz, “Bandstand changed the perception and dissemination of popular music.”   The show helped make rock ‘n roll more acceptable to many adults by bringing the music and the dancing kids into their homes every afternoon, with Clark providing the responsible, clean-cut adult supervision.  Clark’s income was soon approaching $500,000 a year.

“We built a horizontal and vertical music situation… We published the songs…, managed the acts, pressed the records, distributed the records, promoted the records… .”
                          – Dick Clark

     American Banstand also helped to open the doors to a new kind of music business.  And along the way, Dick Clark became a wealthy man, buying into music publishing companies, record labels, and promoting “Philly sound” recording artiststs on those labels — stars such as Frankie Avalon, Bobby Rydell, and Fabian.  Clark also became involved in managing the artists, formed a radio offshoot, and conducted live productions.  He also made personal appearances as a DJ hosting live dance events called  “sock hops”  —  as many as 14 a week.  And he also packaged concert tours, taking the music on the road.  He soon had a nice little musical empire in the making.  “We built a horizontal and vertical music situation,” explained Clark of his various businesses. “. . . We published the songs domestically and abroad, managed the acts, pressed the records, distributed the records, promoted the records. . . .”


Dick Clark Covers
Annenberg-Owned TV Guide

May 24, 1958
May 24, 1958

October 4, 1958
October 4, 1958

August 29, 1959
August 29, 1959

September 10, 1960
September 10, 1960


“Payola” & Congress

August 1958 cover of 'Teen' magazine with Clark & headline: 'Why America Loves Dick Clark's American Bandstand.'
August 1958 cover of 'Teen' magazine with Clark & headline: 'Why America Loves Dick Clark's American Bandstand.'
     In 1960, however, the “payola” scandal broke, a controversy involving prominent radio disc jockeys then implicated in playing records for payment to make them popular. Clark was investigated by Congress during the scandal, along with other prominent DJs like Alan Freed. But Clark, in his appearence before a Congresional committee, was cool and thorough in his testimony, and denied taking “payola.” He emerged from the hearings without lasting harm. However, it was later revealed that Clark had been “given” royalty rights to more than 140 songs.  ABC did require him to divest his outside ventures, more than 30 by one count, including a number of record labels. Still, Clark and American Bandstand held their popularity.

     American Bandstand was broadcast every weekday through the summer of 1963. But in the fall of that year, it became a once-a-week show run on Saturday afternoons. By 1965, Dick Clark, then 35 years old, was making about $1 million a year. By February 1964, American Bandstand moved to Los Angeles, in part to facilitate Clark’s expansion into other TV ventures and film production. It was also easier in L.A. to tap into the recording industry.  By 1965, Dick Clark, then 35, was making about $1 million a year. Musically, the sound on Bandstand changed with the times, featuring the California surf sound in the 1960s, and a decade later, the ‘70s disco beat.  Through it all, dating from the 1950s when Clark took over, Bandstand was one of the few places on television where ethnically-mixed programming could be seen.

1959: "Caravan of Stars."
1959: "Caravan of Stars."

In fact, Clark later claimed that he had integrated the show in the 1950s – a claim disputed by some.  Clark did feature black recording artists as guests on the show in its early years.  When American Bandstand first went national with ABC in August 1957, Lee Andrews and the Hearts appeared among the first guests performing their song, “Long Lonely Nights.”  In that year as well, other black artists also appeared, including Jackie Wilson, Johnny Mathis, Chuck Berry, Mickey & Sylvia, and others.  Integration of the studio audience, however, appears to have been slow and controlled according to research by John Jackson in his 1997 book, American Bandstand, and also Matthew F. Delmont in his 2012 book, The Nicest Kids in Town.  However, there are also reports that when Clark took black and white artists on the road to perform concerts in his “Caravan of Stars” shows of the 1960s – sometimes in towns where segregation was still practiced – he insisted on equal treatment of his performers at those venues, otherwise threatening to pull his show.


Dick Clark shown in American Bandstand's 'rate-a-record' segment sometime in the 1970s.
Dick Clark shown in American Bandstand's 'rate-a-record' segment sometime in the 1970s.

 

Changing Scene

     In the 1970s, with the rise of disco, Bandstand began to become something of an artifact rather than a trend-setter, although still netting its share of popular guests.  By the mid-1980s, with the rise of MTV and other music video channels, American Banstand’s format became dated. In September 1987 Bandstand moved to syndication, and in April 1989 it ran briefly on cable’s USA Network with a new host and Clark as executive producer. The show ended for good on October 7, 1989.  Yet over its three decades, American Bandstand played a key role in the music business.  Not only did it become the place where major record labels sought to showcase their songs and artists, it also generated millions in record sales each year, plus millions in advertising revenue for ABC.  As for recording artists – with the notable exceptions of Elvis Presley, the Beatles, and the Rolling Stones – most of the major rock ‘n roll acts from the 1950s through mid-1980s appeared on the show.

     Sonny and Cher made their first TV appearance on American Bandstand, June 12, 1965.  The Jackson 5 made their TV debut on the show February 21, 1970, as did Aerosmith in December 1973.  In January, 1980, Prince made his TV debut on BandstandBy the mid-1980s, with the rise of MTV and other music video channels, American Bandstand’s format became dated.Among others appearing during the show’s 33-year run were: Buddy Holly, Chuck Berry, James Brown, the Beach Boys, the Doors, Stevie Wonder, Smokey Robinson & the Miracles, the Temptations, the Carpenters, Van Morrison, the Supremes, Marvin Gaye, Neil Diamond, Ike & Tina Turner, Pink Floyd, Creedance Clearwater Revival, George Michael, Rod Stewart, Bon Jovi, Gloria Estefan, Michael Jackson, and last but not least, Madonna, who appeared January 14, 1984 singing the tune “Holiday.”  But even after the show’s on-air demise, American Bandstand did not die. In early 1996, MTV’s sister network, VH-1 began broadcasting old Bandstand episodes, mostly from the 1975-1985 period. Within three months, these reruns – called the Best of American Bandstand, with taped introductions by Dick Clark himself  — became one of VH1′s top-rated programs.

 

Dick Clark’s Empire

     In addition to American Bandstand, Clark amassed a portfolio of other TV and movie productions, among them, numerous TV specials and awards shows. In the late 1960s he did various television series, talent shows, and also hosted TV game shows, culminating in the late 1970s with The $25,000 Pyramid. In the 1980s and 1990s, his Dick Clark Productions, Inc. turned out more than a dozen made-for-television movies, at least 60 TV specials, several Hollywood films, and radio shows. By 1986, Clark had made the Forbes 400 list of the wealthiest Americans. By 1986, Clark had made the Forbes 400 list of the wealthiest Americans. In recent years he continued his TV productions, landing a prime time TV series, American Dreams. That show was set in 1950s-1960s Philadelphia and used American Bandstand footage in its storyline. It ran for three seasons on NBC during 2002-2005. Clark also parlayed the American Bandstand name into other businesses, using it as a brand and capitalizing on its nostalgia cache. He opened a chain of music-themed restaurants using the name Dick Clark’s American Bandstand Grill. Several of these have opened at airports — Indianapolis, Indiana; Newark, New Jersey; Phoenix, Arizona; and Salt Lake City, Utah. Two others are located in Overland Park, Kansas and Cranbury, New Jersey.

One of Dick Clark's 'American Bandstand' Grills. Similar themed venues have also opened in airports.
One of Dick Clark's 'American Bandstand' Grills. Similar themed venues have also opened in airports.
      In June 2006, Dick Clark’s American Bandstand Theater — which uses some now-senior performers from the 1960s era in its acts — was opened in Branson, Missouri. An American Bandstand Grill opened there as well. In 2007, Dick Clark’s American Bandstand Music Complex, with restaurant, opened in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee.

     Throughout his career, Clark kept one foot in the world of radio, and would later focus some of his business interests there, also using it as a platform for rock ’n roll nostalgia.  In 1981, he created The Dick Clark National Music Survey for the Mutual Broadcasting System, which counted down the Top 30 contemporary hits of the week.

Sample recording from one of Dick Clark's radio programs, May 1985.
Sample recording from one of Dick Clark's radio programs, May 1985.
Beginning in 1982, Clark also hosted a weekly weekend radio program distributed by his own syndicator, United Stations Radio Networks. That program focused on oldies, called Dick Clark’s Rock, Roll, and Remember — also the name of a 1976 autobiographical book he wrote with another author. This radio program would also sell recordings of its shows, some of which involved Clark interviews with, and/or features on, current and former music stars. By 1986, he left Mutual Broadcasting to host another show, Countdown America. In the 1990s, Clark hosted U.S. Music Survey, which he continued hosting up until 2004, when he suffered a stroke. Although he recovered partially from his stroke, his public appearances since that time have been limited.


Bandstand Acquired

     In June 2007, Daniel Snyder, owner of the Washington Redskins professional football team and Six Flags amusement parks, and also a partner with Tom Cruise in a film venture, announced the purchase of Dick Clark Productions for $175 million. In the deal, Snyder became the owner of American Bandstand‘s entire library of televised dance shows stretching over 30-plus years. In addition, Snyder is also acquiring other Dick Clark assets, including the New Year’s Rockin’ Eve broadcast from Times Square, the Golden Globe Awards show, the American Music Awards, the Academy of Country Music Awards, and the Family Television Awards. In 2007, Dan Snyder, owner of the Washington Redskins, acquired Dick Clark Productions for $175 million including Band- stand‘s 30-year library of TV shows. The Dick Clark properties also include the Bloopers television shows and Fox’s popular reality TV show, So You Think You Can Dance. Snyder, who will take over as chairman of Dick Clark Productions, said in a press release, “This was a rare opportunity to acquire a powerhouse portfolio and grow it in new directions.” It was not entirely clear at the time of the deal’s announcement, exactly what Snyder would do with the American Bandstand material, other than mention of possibly using it visually on television screens throughout Six Flags amusement parks while patrons were standing on line.

     Today, the legacy of American Bandstand is alive and well, and can be found in various venues, including the internet, You Tube, and various fan web sites.  There are also a number of books on Dick Clark and the show, including Clark’s 1976 autobiography written with Richard Robinson, and a 1997 volume authored by John A. Jackson entitled,  American Bandstand: Dick Clark and the Making of a Rock ‘n’ Roll Empire.

     Other Bandstand-related stories at this website include, “Bandstand Performers, 1957″ and  “At The Hop, 1957-1958.”  Thanks for visiting. - Jack Doyle.

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________________________________

Date Posted:  25 March 2008
Last Update:  24 April 2012
Comments to:  
jdoyle@pophistorydig.com

Article Citation:
Jack Doyle, “American Bandstand, 1956-2007,”
PopHistoryDig.com, March 25, 2008.

___________________________


 


Sources, Links & Additional Information

John Jackson's 1997 book on Dick Clark and American Bandstand.
John Jackson's 1997 book on Dick Clark and American Bandstand.
Dick Clark’s 1976 autobiography written with Richard Robinson.
Dick Clark’s 1976 autobiography written with Richard Robinson.

“Challenging the Giants,” Newsweek, December 23, 1957, p. 70.

“Drive, Talent, Hits, Clark Help Make Philly the Hottest,” Billboard, March 10, 1958, p. 4.

“Dick Clark – New Rage of the Teenagers,” New York Times, March 16, 1958, Section 2, p. 13.

“Tall, That’s All,” Time, Monday, April 14, 1958.

“TV Bandstand: Teenagers’ Favorite,” Look, vol. 22. May 13, 1958, pp. 69-72.

“Newest Music for a New Generation: Rock ‘n’ Roll Rolls On ‘n’ On,” Life, December 22, 1958, pp. 37-43.

“America’s Favorite Bandstander” (Dick Clark cover story), Look, November 24, 1959.

“Facing the Music,” Time, Monday, November 30,1959.

“Teen-Agers’ Dreamboat,” New York Times, March 5, 1960.

Arnold Shaw, The Rockin’ ’50s: The Decade That Transformed the Pop Music Scene, New York: Hawthorn Books, 1974.

Dick Clark and Richard Robinson, Rock, Roll & Remember, Thomas Y. Crowell, Publisher, 1976.

Robert Stephen Spitz, Rock, Roll & Remember, Book Review, New York Times, October 24, 1976.

Michael Shore with Dick Clark, The History of American Bandstand, New York: Ballantine Books, 1985.

“Clark Around the Clock,” Newsweek, August 18, 1986, pp. 26-27.

Summary of the National Register of Historic Places Nomination for American Bandstand building, WFIL and WHYY studios, 4548 Market St., Philadelphia., Pennsylvania, July 28, 1986.

“American Bandstand” and “Dick Clark,” The Museum of American Broadcast Communications.

Dick Clark,” The Radio Hall of Fame.

Ginia Bellafante, “Ultrasuede Is Funny – VH-1′s Reruns of American Bandstand Prove the Hootie Network Can Outwit MTV,” Time, Monday, April 22, 1996.

John A. Jackson, American Bandstand: Dick Clark and the Making of a Rock ‘n’ Roll Empire, New York: Oxford University Press, 1997.

Fred Goodman, “Roll Over, Beethoven: How Dick Clark Taught American Parents not to be Afraid of Rock-and-Roll and Made a Fortune in the Process,” Dick Clark and the Making of a Rock ‘n’ Roll Empire, Book Review, New York Times, October 26, 1997.

Richard Corliss, “Philly Fifties: Rock ‘n Radio,” Saturday, July 14, 2001.

Hank Bordowitz, Turning Points in Rock and Roll, Citadel Press, 2004.

Thomas Heath and Howard Schneider, “Snyder Adds A TV Icon To His Empire, “Washington Post, Wednesday, June 20, 2007, P. D-1.

Ken Emerson, “The Spin on ‘Bandstand” – Music, TV and Popular Culture Learned to Swing to the Beat of a Different Drummer: Big Bucks,” Los Angeles Times, August 5, 2007.

Becky Krystal, “Dick Clark, Host of ‘American Bandstand,’ Dies at 82,” Washington Post, April 18, 2012.

Matthew F. Delmont, The Nicest Kids in Town: American Bandstand, Rock ‘n’ Roll, and the Struggle for Civil Rights in 1950s Philadelphia, Berkeley: University of California Press, February 2012.

Matthew F. Delmont, “The America of ‘Bandstand’,” Washington Post, Sunday, April 22, 2012, p. B-2.

Democracy Now, “Despite Rep for Integration, TV’s Iconic ‘American Bandstand’ Kept Black Teens Off Its Stage,” YouTube.com, Mar 2, 2012.

Alex Alvarez, “DJ ‘Cousin Brucie’ Recalls Dick Clark’s Commitment To Racial Integration: ‘If We Don’t Go All Together, We Go Out’,” Mediaite.com, April 19th, 2012.

John Liberty, “Dick Clark Remembered: the Velvelettes Say Icon Defended Them in Segregated South, Share Memories of 1964 Tour,” Mlive.com, April 20, 2012.

A documentary film entitled The Wages of Spin, focuses on the history of American Bandstand, the 1950s payola scandal, and Dick Clark.  A preview clip from that documentary is available at You Tube and additional information is found at Character Driven Films.







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